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Development economists at Michigan study such diverse topics as agriculture, international migration, political economy, economic history, microfinance, health, education, firms, and the environment.  It is an eclectic subfield, drawing on all other subfields of economics. Students studying development at Michigan have the advantage of being able to seek advice and guidance from excellent faculty across all other subfields in the department, as well as from other units on campus such as the schools of public policy, business, information, environment and sustainability, and public health. Development faculty at Michigan from all these units consider themselves an integrated group, gather weekly at the Economic Development Seminar (EDS), and co-advise Ph.D. students’ dissertations.

Primary Appointment within the Economics Department

   

   

Primary Appointment outside the Economics Department

Ross School of Business

Ross School of Business

School for Environment and Sustainability

School of Public Health

Ford School of Public Policy

Ford School of Public Policy

Ross School of Business

School of Information & Department of Economics (courtesy)

Recent Graduate Student Placement Locations

UC Irvine

University of Alabama

Inter-American Development Bank

Penn State

NHH Norwegian School of Economics

IMF

UC San Diego

Mathematica

Loyola Marymount

University of Maryland

Duke University

Princeton University

University of Washington

University of Minnesota

Peking University

Ashoka University

William and Mary

Seminars, Reading Groups, Lunches, etc.

Economic Development Seminar (Thursday afternoons)

Health, History, Development and Demography Lunch Seminar (H2D2) (Tuesdays)

Selected Recent Publications

Adhvaryu, "Learning, misallocation, and technology adoption: evidence from new malaria therapy in Tanzania," Review of Economic Studies, 2014.

Adhvaryu and Nyshadham, “Early Life Circumstance and Adult Mental Health,” Journal of Political Economy, 2019. (Joint with Fenske.)

Bergquist, "Sell Low and Buy High: Arbitrage and Local Price Effects in Kenyan Markets," Quarterly Journal of Economics, 2019. (Joint with Burke & Miguel.)

Bleakley, “Shocking Behavior: Random Wealth in Antebellum Georgia and Human Capital Across Generations,” Quarterly Journal of Economics, 2016. (Joint with Ferrie.)

Clyde, “Improving Private Sector Impact on Poverty Alleviation: A Cost-Based Taxonomy,” California Management Review, 2015. (Joint with Karnani.)

Jagger, “Smallholder Livelihood Responses to Climate Anomalies in Rural Uganda,” World Development, 2019. (Joint with Call & Gray.)

Lam, “Progress through School and the Determinants of School Dropout in South Africa,” Development Southern Africa, 2014. (Joint with Hofmeyr.)

Maffioli, “Does improving appropriate use of malaria medicines change population beliefs in testing and treatment? Evidence from a randomized controlled trial,” Health Policy and Planning, 2020. (Joint with Mohanan, Saran, & O’Meara.)

Montero, “Traditional Medicine in Central Africa,” American Economic Association Papers and Proceedings, 2019. (Joint with Lowes.)

Neggers, “Enfranchising Your Own? Experimental Evidence on Bureaucrat Diversity and Election Bias in India,”  American Economic Review, 2018.

Yang, “Taken by Storm: Hurricanes, Migrant Networks, and U.S. Immigration," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, 2020. (Joint with Mahajan.)