Current Grants

Michal Zochowski, Participating Investigator with Specified Effort
Health and Human Services, Department of National Institutes of Health (Grant Completed: 8/31/2022)
Thalamocortical and corticocortical mechanisms for sleep-dependent visual learning

Abstract

Consolidating transient sensory experiences into long-lasting memories is a fundamental function of the brain, linked to synaptic plasticity. The importance of sleep for promoting this process, and the disruptive effect of sleep deprivation on it, have been appreciated for nearly a century. However, it remains unclear how sleep-associated changes in the activity of specific brain circuits contribute to sensory plasticity. Using a combination of longitudinal recordings of neuronal activity in freely-behaving mice, recently-developed optogenetic strategies, novel computational tools for characterizing network activity patterns, we will test the necessity and sufficiency of sleep-associated patterns of thalamocortical activity in consolidating a simple form of experience dependent plasticity. We will test the hypothesis that coherent firing during network oscillations unique NREM sleep plays a causal role in promoting plasticity between the thalamic lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) and the primary visual cortex (V1) following presentation of a novel visual stimulus. Here we will selectively manipulate cortical, thalamocortical and corticothalamic neuronal populations in a state specific manner. We will measure both response changes in individual V1 and LGN neurons to the presented stimulus, and behavioral responses to the presented stimulus in the context of a visual discrimination task. We will test whether neurons that are selectively responsive to the visual stimulus play a critical role in guiding network activity patterns during subsequent sleep, acting as an instructive mechanism for circuit plasticity. Finally, we will test whether following visual experience, sleep-dependent communication between V1 and the perirhinal cortex (essential for visual recognition memory) is responsible sleep-dependent discrimination learning.

Xiaoming Mao, U-M Principal Investigator
National Science Foundation
(End Date: 8/31/2021)
EFRI NewLAW: Topological acoustic metamaterials for programmable and high-efficiency one-way transport

Abstract

EFRI NewLAW: Topological acoustic metamaterials for programmable and high-efficiency one-way transport
Abstract: This proposal is concerned with the design and realization of acoustic metamaterials with nonreciprocal wave propagation protected by the phonon band topology, with special emphasis on the propagation of bulk waves and on the development of classes of control strategies relying on structural mechanisms. The plan towards these goals is articulated along three thrusts: (1) understanding of the fundamental role played by topology on the propagation of waves in spatial-temporally modulated media, which will allow us to mechanically program the band structure of metamaterials to achieve non-reciprocal transport; (2) design of Maxwell-lattice-based metastructures, which will realize oneway transport through mechanically triggered transitions between topological insulator-like and metallike states as well as reconfigurable integrated acoustic circuits; (3) experimental demonstration of the proposed concepts on prototypes at different spatial and complexity scales using the state-of-the-art fabrication techniques and laser-enabled wave reconstruction capabilities of the team.

Xiaoming Mao, U-M Principal Investigator
National Science Foundation
(End Date: 8/31/2021)
EFRI NewLAW: Topological acoustic metamaterials for programmable and high-efficiency one-way transport

Abstract

EFRI NewLAW: Topological acoustic metamaterials for programmable and high-efficiency one-way transport
Abstract: This proposal is concerned with the design and realization of acoustic metamaterials with nonreciprocal wave propagation protected by the phonon band topology, with special emphasis on the propagation of bulk waves and on the development of classes of control strategies relying on structural mechanisms. The plan towards these goals is articulated along three thrusts: (1) understanding of the fundamental role played by topology on the propagation of waves in spatial-temporally modulated media, which will allow us to mechanically program the band structure of metamaterials to achieve non-reciprocal transport; (2) design of Maxwell-lattice-based metastructures, which will realize oneway transport through mechanically triggered transitions between topological insulator-like and metallike states as well as reconfigurable integrated acoustic circuits; (3) experimental demonstration of the proposed concepts on prototypes at different spatial and complexity scales using the state-of-the-art fabrication techniques and laser-enabled wave reconstruction capabilities of the team.

Michal Zochowski, Participating Investigator with Specified Effort
Health and Human Services, Department of National Institutes of Health (End Date: 8/31/2022)
Thalamocortical and corticocortical mechanisms for sleep-dependent visual learning

Abstract

EFRI NewLAW: Topological acoustic metamaterials for programmable and high-efficiency one-way transport
Abstract: This proposal is concerned with the design and realization of acoustic metamaterials with nonreciprocal wave propagation protected by the phonon band topology, with special emphasis on the propagation of bulk waves and on the development of classes of control strategies relying on structural mechanisms. The plan towards these goals is articulated along three thrusts: (1) understanding of the fundamental role played by topology on the propagation of waves in spatial-temporally modulated media, which will allow us to mechanically program the band structure of metamaterials to achieve non-reciprocal transport; (2) design of Maxwell-lattice-based metastructures, which will realize oneway transport through mechanically triggered transitions between topological insulator-like and metallike states as well as reconfigurable integrated acoustic circuits; (3) experimental demonstration of the proposed concepts on prototypes at different spatial and complexity scales using the state-of-the-art fabrication techniques and laser-enabled wave reconstruction capabilities of the team.

Xiaoming Mao, U-M Principal Investigator
National Science Foundation
(End Date: 8/31/2021)
EFRI NewLAW: Topological acoustic metamaterials for programmable and high-efficiency one-way transport

Abstract

EFRI NewLAW: Topological acoustic metamaterials for programmable and high-efficiency one-way transport
Abstract: This proposal is concerned with the design and realization of acoustic metamaterials with nonreciprocal wave propagation protected by the phonon band topology, with special emphasis on the propagation of bulk waves and on the development of classes of control strategies relying on structural mechanisms. The plan towards these goals is articulated along three thrusts: (1) understanding of the fundamental role played by topology on the propagation of waves in spatial-temporally modulated media, which will allow us to mechanically program the band structure of metamaterials to achieve non-reciprocal transport; (2) design of Maxwell-lattice-based metastructures, which will realize oneway transport through mechanically triggered transitions between topological insulator-like and metallike states as well as reconfigurable integrated acoustic circuits; (3) experimental demonstration of the proposed concepts on prototypes at different spatial and complexity scales using the state-of-the-art fabrication techniques and laser-enabled wave reconstruction capabilities of the team.