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Current Students

Questions regarding academics during COVID-19? Click here.

As the situation develops, we are compiling a complete list of Honors COVID-19 FAQ. Topics range from Courses, Registrations & Transcripts through Graduation. It's conveniently anchored, so that you can hyperjump to your item of interest. 

LINK TO Honors COVID-19 FAQ

 

Current students will find answers here to questions about academic requirements, housing, scholarships and grants, as well as many of the forms necessary to process student records.

Use the Make an Advising Appointment button, above, to schedule your own advising appointments. All advisors are skilled in the many majors and tracks LSA Honors students pursue. If you have a regular advisor, you may seek by the name, or you may seek appointment availability by date, day, or time. 

At the bottom of the page, the Quick Links will connect you to frequently visited areas in the Current Students section of our website. You will also find forms, scholarship and grant information, housing details, and more, from the buttons in the task bar on the left. If you have additional questions, please email ask.honors@umich.edu.

The Atlas Schedule Builder is a useful course scheduling tool for students. Check out this Quick Start Guide or the Atlas Schedule Builder:  Walkthrough Tutorial for more information.

PLEASE NOTE:  When browsing in the Course Guide, the number of available seats in a section is listed in the Open Seats column. The number of seats in the Open Restricted Seats column does not reflect the actual number of open seats. 

Honors Core Curriculum for Fall 2022

Use the links below to read the full LSA Course Guide description of each course. 

Please note:  The course descriptions in the Atlas Course Profile tool may not be up-to-date. Refer to the LSA Course Guide for the most current course descriptions.

 

Honors 240 / Wellness (SS, FYWR)

Honors 241 / Westworld and Philosophy of Mind (HU, FYWR)

GTBOOKS 191 / Great Books (HU, FYWR)

 

Honors Mini-Courses for First-Year Students

Honors 135 Mini-Courses

Section 001 / War Is Over! An Introduction to Post-Conflict Peacebuilding

Section 002 /The Politics of Our Identities

Section 003 / Sustainable Food, Culture, and the Environment

Section 004 / Written in Bone

Section 005 / Memory and the Monument: The Tombstone in Classical Greece and the Roman Near East

Section 006 / Introduction to Music and Audio Production: Creative Resources as a U-M Student

Section 007 / The Age of Surveillance Capitalism

Section 008 / What’s Next? Vaccines, Long COVID, and Health Care Reform 

Honors Seminars

Honors 251 / The Symphonic Century:  Music and Revolution in the 19th Century (HU)

Note:  This is NOT an Honors Core course.

Departmental Honors Courses for Fall 2022

By selecting Honors under Special Offerings in the LSA Course Guide, students will find a fairly comprehensive list of Honors courses available for the term. Depending on course coding used by the department, you may find other courses throughout a search, but this is a great start in planning your schedule.

BIOLOGY 171 – Introductory Biology: Ecology and Evolution (NS)
Section: 002, 004(LEC), Sec 200, 201 (DIS) LSA HNRS
BIOLOGY 171 is a one-term course in ecology and evolutionary biology that, together with BIOLOGY 172 and 173, collectively form the introductory biology course unit.
The primary aims of BIOLOGY 171 are:
1. to provide factual and conceptual knowledge concerning the origin and complex interactions of the Earth's biodiversity
2. to give an integrated overview of biological organization including genes, individuals, kin groups, populations, species, communities, and ecosystems
3. to engage with biological hypotheses dealing with prominent current issues such as human evolutionary origins, emerging diseases, conservation biology and global change
4. to develop critical-thinking and writing skills.
Topics in BIOLOGY 171 are divided among three primary areas:
• Mendelian genetics and evolutionary processes
• Biodiversity, organismal biology
• Ecology

BIOLOGY 172 – Introductory Biology – Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental (NS)
Section: 002 (LEC), Sec 200 (DIS) LSA HNRS
BIOLOGY 172 is a one-term course in molecular, cellular, and developmental biology that, together with BIOLOGY 171 and 173, collectively forms the introductory biology course sequence.
The aims of BIOLOGY 172 are:
• to provide factual and conceptual knowledge of how cells, organs, and organisms work; and
• to develop scientific hypothesis-testing and critical-thinking skills.

CHEM 210 – Structure and Reactivity I (NS) 
Option for Structured Study Groups (SSG) exist. See instructor.
Honors for this course is related to participation in SSG only.

CHEM 211 – Investigations in Chemistry (NS)
Section: 400 (LEC), 410 - 415 (LAB)
CHEM 211-400 is a science and project-oriented section of CHEM 211 that is meant for students who wish to take CHEM 211 at a slightly higher level. The location of the course is in the upper-level laboratory rooms, so the sections are slightly smaller and better equipped for testing out original ideas. The last third of the course is a relativeily independent project.
Students who complete CHEM 211-400 will receive a designation of "Honors" on their transcripts.

Honors option for CHEM 230, 260, 262–Compute to Learn

For further information, please contact the Chemistry Undergraduate Office.


ECON 101 – Principles of Economics I (SS, QR/2)

Section: 300 (LEC), 313(DIS) LSA HNRS
This course introduces fundamental microeconomic concepts and analysis.This includes supply and demand; theories of the firm and consumer choice; and competition, monopoly, and imperfect competition. Throughout the semester, the course will stress applications of elementary economic theory to real-world issues and problems. We will address a number of policy questions including environmental regulation, price regulation, and redistributive spending and taxation.

GEOG 145/INTLSTD 101– Introduction to International Studies (SS)
Section: 001 (LEC), Sec 012 (DIS) LSA HNRS
This is the introductory core course for the International Studies major at the University of Michigan. The course explores human rights, human development and human security in historical and comparative perspective using multiple disciplinary approaches. The curriculum is divided into six modules that cover:
• globalization;
• international relations and organizations;
• human rights and humanitarianism;
• global environment and health;
• human development; and
• culture and identity.
Honors:
Students in the Honors section will have discussions with the primary instructor for the course. These discussions will address special topics that build on material covered in lecture, and enable the students to explore key topics of international significance in more depth.
Students in the Honors section will also write a longer paper and make one short presentation to their group.

HISTORY 282 - A HISTORY OF THE ECONOMY (SS)
Section: 018 (LSA Hnrs)
When historians study the economy they are interested in far more than the development of institutions like banks or stock markets, far more than the changes over time in indices of productivity or wealth. Instead, we want to understand how the very concept of a “stock” came to be, or how different people have understood the meaning of “productivity” in different times and places. The foundational premise of any good historical study of the economy is that this topic cannot be reduced to universalistic formulas, valid always and everywhere.


This course will teach you how the economies that we know today were created, exploring the complicated stories behind the values, social norms, power relations, and unstated assumptions that constitute economic life. We will shift back and forth from the macro level (examining long-term patterns and trends and grand economic theories) and the micro level (studying our everyday practices regarding things like money, jobs, or consumption). We will also go beyond the study of capitalist economics, exploring as well the socialist systems of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. The readings for this class will consist mostly of primary sources, including the writings of famous economists, political manifestos dealing with economic policies, and first-hand accounts from workers, business-owners, merchants, bankers, union activists, and more.
 

INTLSTD 101/GEOG 145 – Introduction to International Studies (SS)
Section: 001 (LEC), Sec 012 (DIS) LSA HNRS
This is the introductory core course for the International Studies major at the University of Michigan. The course explores human rights, human development and human security in historical and comparative perspective using multiple disciplinary approaches. The curriculum is divided into six modules that cover:
• globalization;
• international relations and organizations;
• human rights and humanitarianism;
• global environment and health;
• human development; and
• culture and identity.
Honors:
Students in the Honors section will have discussions with the primary instructor for the course. These discussions will address special topics that build on material covered in lecture, and enable the students to explore key topics of international significance in more depth.
Students in the Honors section will also write a longer paper and make one short presentation to their group.

LATIN 231 – Roman Kings and Emperors
Section: 004
This course reviews grammar as it introduces you to the masters of classical Latin prose and poetry through adapted texts on Rome's history and through extensive passages from Caesar' De Bello Gallico, Augustus' Res Gestae and Vergil. Efficient reading, vocabulary and translations skills are the goal. In addition, you will acquire knowledge of meter and poetic style. The successful completion of the course allows you to fulfill the final semester of your language requirement with a 300 or 400 level Latin class which already counts towards a minor or major in a Classics-related field. For freshmen, LAT 301 or higher taken in their first year also carries automatically an honors notation. The graduate number for this course is LAT 503.

MATH 156 – Applied Honors Calculus II (MSA, QR/1)
Section: 001 - 007
MATH 156 is part of the applied Honors calculus sequence for engineering and science majors. Applications and concepts receive equal treatment. Theorems are stated precisely and are derived, but technical details are omitted. Examples are given to illustrate the theory. Critical thinking and class participation are encouraged. The goal is to provide students with the solid background needed for subsequent courses in mathematics, engineering, and science.

MATH 185 – Honors Calculus I (MSA, QR/1)
Section: 001
Most students take calculus in high school, and it may seem that there isn't much new to learn. The goal of this course is to develop the familiar concepts of calculus using a more rigorous and theoretical approach. In particular, with its emphasis on how to use appropriate mathematical language, this course lays a solid foundation for future math courses, and is suitable for students intending to pursue a major in mathematics, science, or engineering who desire a more complete understanding of the underpinnings of calculus. This sequence is not restricted to students enrolled in the LSA Honors Program. 

MATH 285 – Honors Multivariable and Vector Calculus (MSA, QR/1)
Section: 001, 002
The sequence Math 185-186-285-286 is an introduction to calculus at the honors level. It is taken by students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields who want a somewhat more theoretical approach. Although much attention is paid to concepts and solving problems, the underlying theory and proofs of important results are also included. This sequence is not restricted to students enrolled in the LSA Honors Program.

MATH 286 – Honors Differential Equations (MSA, QR/1)
Section: 001
The sequence Math 185-186-285-286 is an introduction to calculus at the honors level. It is taken by students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields who want a somewhat more theoretical approach. Although much attention is paid to concepts and solving problems, the underlying theory and proofs of important results are also included. This sequence is not restricted to students enrolled in the LSA Honors Program.

MATH 295 – Honors Mathematics I (MSA, QR/1)
Section: 001
Math 295-296-395-396 is the most theoretical and demanding honors calculus sequence. The emphasis is on concepts, problem solving, as well as the underlying theory and proofs of important results. It provides an excellent background for advanced courses in mathematics. The expected background is high school trigonometry and algebra (previous calculus is not required, but is helpful.) This sequence is not restricted to students enrolled in the LSA Honors program. Math 295 and 296 may be substituted for any Math 451 requirement. Math 296 and 395 may be substituted for any Math 217 requirement.

For more information on Math courses, please visit the Department of Mathematics webpage.

PHIL 296 – Honors Introduction to Logic (MSA, QR/1)
Section: 001
An introduction to the study of modern formal logic, with attention to its mathematical development and to its philosophical foundations and applications.

PHYSICS 160 – Honors Physics I (NS, QR/1)
Section: 001
PHYSICS 160 covers the fundamental principles of mechanics using a modern perspective and is intended for students who have had significant exposure to physics at the high school level and/or have AP credit for physics. It emphasizes the applicability of these laws in systems ranging from binary stars to nuclear collisions. This class will be different, and more interesting, than any physics course you have taken yet.
The goals of the course are:
1. Application of fundamental principles to a wide range of systems, i.e., from nuclei to stars (unify mechanics)
2. Integrate contemporary physics (atomic models of matter, relativistic dynamics)
3. Engage students in physical modeling (idealization, approximation, assumptions, estimation)
4. Integrate computational physics (now a partner of theory and experiment) into problem solving

PHYSICS 161 – Honors Introductory Mechanics Lab (NS)
Section: 001, 002, 003
PHYSICS 161 is a three-hour weekly laboratory designed to accompany PHYSICS 160.
This lab introduces students to the core concepts of physics, namely careful observations, both quantitative and qualitative, followed by comparison with appropriate mathematical models that serve as the basis for descriptive interpretation. Course material is focused on developing a good understanding of the concepts and principles of Newtonian mechanics while providing sophisticated experiments for demonstrating the validity of these fundamental paradigms.

PHYSICS 260 – Honors Physics II (NS, QR/1)
Section: 001
PHYSICS 260 is a continuation of PHYSICS 160 and introduces the theory of electromagnetic phenomena. This course will introduce you to:
1. The deeper physical meaning of the concepts
2. A rigorous mathematical approach, using vector calculus when applicable
3. Problem solving including computer use
4. Contemporary applications
If you like physics and math, appreciate the deeper meaning and derivation of concepts and equations, and if you like to do problems, you are in the right course.

PHYSICS 261 – Honors Electricity and Magnetism Lab (NS)
Section: 001, 002
PHYSICS 261 is a three-hour weekly laboratory designed to accompany PHYSICS 260. This lab introduces students to the core concepts of physics, namely careful observations, both quantitative and qualitative, followed by comparison with appropriate mathematical models that serve as the basis for descriptive interpretation. Course material is focused on developing a good understanding of the concepts and principles of Newtonian mechanics while providing sophisticated experiments for demonstrating the validity of these fundamental paradigms. The analytical techniques require high school level algebra and some familiarity with statistical measures of significance, procedures common to any scientific, technical, or medical area of inquiry. Although not an academic requirement, it is assumed that the students will have some basic skills in using a computer at the level of a word processing program or similar application task.

PSYCH 121 - Mind, Machine, & Mathematics (NS, FYSem)
Section: 002
This First Year Seminar will introduce to Honors students cognitive roots to human intelligence, with a goal of designing artificial general intelligence. It will examine in-depth the concept of rationality in reasoning, memory, and decision making. What are the principles of rational decision making? Can we teach machines to reason, in a way that understand us better than we do ourselves? Why are there different memory systems and how they support cognition? By in- class demonstrations of various pitfalls and failures of rationality of the human mind, this seminar aims to instigate students’ curiosity into cognitive science and machine intelligence, while exploring the intertwining topics of mind and cognition, machine intelligence, and mathematical reasoning.
The instructor strives to provide a supportive environment for self-motivated students who intend to pursue Cognitive Science, Mathematics, Physics, Computer Science, Neuroscience, etc, as they settle into their college life.
 

STATS 280 – Honors Introduction to Statistics and Data Analysis (MSA, QR/1)
Section: 001 
STATS 280 will provide in-depth discussion of models and methods that are appropriate to specific situations, criteria for selecting among them, their strengths and weaknesses and their conceptual footing. Interactive learning will be emphasized in lectures and the laboratory module. During the lab, students will learn to use modern statistical software for visualization and data analysis, and carry out the computational parts of lab assignments.
STATS 280 includes derivations of basic statistical results such as expected values and sampling variances using techniques from pre-calculus mathematics. Students will also be expected to master quantitative relationships such as scaling relationships between variances, sample sizes, and standard errors.
Definition and summary of univariate and bivariate data, distributions, correlation, and associated visualization techniques; randomization in comparative studies and in survey sampling; basic probability calculus, including conditional probabilities, concept of random variables and their properties; sampling distributions and the central limit theorem; statistical inference, including hypothesis tests, confidence intervals; one sample and two sample problems with binary and continuous data, including nonparametric procedures; analysis of variance; simple and bivariate regression; simple design of experiments; chisquare and rank-based tests for association and independence.


 

 

                       


 




 


 

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