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Current Students

Current students will find answers to questions about academic requirements, housing, scholarships and grants, as well as many of the forms necessary to process student records.

Use the Make an Advising Appointment button, above, to schedule your own advising appointments. All advisors are skilled in the many majors and tracks LSA Honors students pursue. If you have a regular advisor, you may seek by the name, or you may seek appointment availability by date, day, or time. 

Below, the Quick Links will connect you to frequently visited areas under Current Students. You will also find forms, scholarship and grant information, housing details, and more, from the buttons in the task bar on the right. If you have additional questions, please email ask.honors@umich.edu.

Honors Core Curriculum for Fall 2020

Use the links below to read the full LSA Course Guide description of each course. 

Honors 230 / The Corporation (SS)

Instructor:  Matthew Hull

Honors 231 / Reading the Quran (HU)

Instructor:  Karla Mallette

Honors 232 / Your Inner Ape (NS)

Instructor:  Laura MacLatchy

Honors 241.005 / Detroit and Gentrification Now (HU, FYWR)

Instructor:  Kristin Hass

Honors 241.010 / Westworld and Philosophy of Mind (HU, FYWR)

Instructor:  George Hoffmann

Honors Mini-Courses for First-Year Students for Fall 2020

Honors 135-Information will be posted in May

Honors 170 / Navigating Honors: Honors First-year Experience

 

Honors Seminars for Fall 2020

Note:  Seminars are not Honors Core courses

Honors 250 / Evolution of Cognition and Social Science Ways of Knowing (SS)

Instructor:  William Birdsall

Honors 251 / Opera, Gender and Culture (HU)

Meets together with RCHUMS 334 and WGS 313

Instructor:  Naomi Andre

Honors 354 / Race and Identity in Music (HU, RE)

Instructor:  Naomi Andre

Honors 493 / Wellbeing + Public Policy

Instructor:  Abdul El-Sayed (Helen L. De Roy Visiting Professor in Honors)

 

Departmental Honors Courses for Fall 2020

By selecting Honors under Special Offerings in the LSA Course Guide, students will find a fairly comprehensive list of Honors courses available for the term. Depending on course coding used by the department, you may find other courses throughout a search, but this is a great start in planning your schedule.

BIOLOGY 171 – Introductory Biology: Ecology and Evolution (NS)
Section: 002, 004 (LEC), Sec 200, 201 (DIS) LSA HNRS
Instructor: Meghan Duffy
BIOLOGY 171 is a one-term course in ecology and evolutionary biology that, together with BIOLOGY 172 and 173, collectively form the introductory biology course unit.
The primary aims of BIOLOGY 171 are:
1. to provide factual and conceptual knowledge concerning the origin and complex interactions of the Earth's biodiversity
2. to give an integrated overview of biological organization including genes, individuals, kin groups, populations, species, communities, and ecosystems
3. to engage with biological hypotheses dealing with prominent current issues such as human evolutionary origins, emerging diseases, conservation biology and global change
4. to develop critical-thinking and writing skills.
Topics in BIOLOGY 171 are divided among three primary areas:
• Mendelian genetics and evolutionary processes
• Biodiversity, organismal biology
• Ecology


BIOLOGY 172 – Introductory Biology – Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental (NS)
Section: 002, 004 (LEC), Sec 200 (DIS) LSA HNRS
Instructor: Matthew Chapman, Gyorgyi Csankovszki
BIOLOGY 172 is a one-term course in molecular, cellular, and developmental biology that, together with BIOLOGY 171 and 173, collectively forms the introductory biology course sequence.
The aims of BIOLOGY 172 are:
• to provide factual and conceptual knowledge of how cells, organs, and organisms work; and
• to develop scientific hypothesis-testing and critical-thinking skills.


CHEM 210-Structure and Reactivity I (NS)
Saved Honors seats, no Honors attribute
Option for Structured Study Groups (SSG) exist. See instructor.
Honors for this course is related to participation in SSG only.


CHEM 211 – Investigations in Chemistry (NS)
Saved Honors seats, no Honors attribute
Section: 400 (LEC), Sec 410-415 (LAB) Honors
CHEM 211 is a laboratory introduction to methods of investigation in inorganic and organic chemistry. Students solve individual problems using microscale equipment and a variety of techniques such as thin layer chromatography, titrations, and spectroscopy. Chem 211-400 is focused on techniques used for the synthesis, isolation, and purification of organic compounds, and the content differs from the 100, 200, and 300 sections.


Honors option for CHEM 230 and CHEM 260–Compute to Learn

For further information, please contact the Chemistry Undergraduate Office.


GEOG 145/INTLSTD 101– Introduction to International Studies (SS)
Section: 001 (LEC), Sec 012 (DIS) LSA HNRS
This is the introductory core course for the International Studies major at the University of Michigan. The course explores human rights, human development and human security in historical and comparative perspective using multiple disciplinary approaches. The curriculum is divided into six modules that cover:
• globalization;
• international relations and organizations;
• human rights and humanitarianism;
• global environment and health;
• human development; and
• culture and identity.
Honors:
Students in the Honors section will have discussions with the primary instructor for the course. These discussions will address special topics that build on material covered in lecture, and enable the students to explore key topics of international significance in more depth.
Students in the Honors section will also write a longer paper and make one short presentation to their group.


GTBOOKS 191 – Great Books (HU, FYWR)
Section: 001 (LEC), Sec 002-013 (DIS) LSA HNRS
Instructor: Basil Dufallo
In the second half of Great Books, we move from Greco-Roman antiquity into the modern era, focusing on philosophical and religious texts that inherit the Classical traditions studied in the first term. The theme of this course is “Who am I?” and all of the texts we will read not only interrogate the idea of soul, psyche, and self, but owing to their stature at least in some measure, actually help to create or invent new avatars of the self. We start with Plato’s Republic, a psychological treatise that informs Western conceptions of the self for the next two millennia. At the end of the class, we read modern works that answer to the classical texts we’ve studied, including Freud’s Interpretation of Dreams and Tony Morrison’s Beloved. Along the way, we’ll read Virgil, Dante, and Marcus Aurelius.


INTLSTD 101/GEOG 145 – Introduction to International Studies (SS)
Section: 001 (LEC), Sec 012 (DIS) LSA HNRS
This is the introductory core course for the International Studies major at the University of Michigan. The course explores human rights, human development and human security in historical and comparative perspective using multiple disciplinary approaches. The curriculum is divided into six modules that cover:
• globalization;
• international relations and organizations;
• human rights and humanitarianism;
• global environment and health;
• human development; and
• culture and identity.
Honors:
Students in the Honors section will have discussions with the primary instructor for the course. These discussions will address special topics that build on material covered in lecture, and enable the students to explore key topics of international significance in more depth.
Students in the Honors section will also write a longer paper and make one short presentation to their group.


LATIN 231 – Roman Kings and Emperors
Section: 004
Instructor: Donka Markus
This course reviews grammar as it introduces you to the masters of classical Latin prose and poetry through readings from Livy, Caesar, Catullus and Ovid (first centuries B.C. and A.D.). The goal is to acquire efficient reading, translation and study skills while exploring texts, concepts and historical traditions that shed light on Rome's growth into an Empire. Free tutoring and computer support for self-practice are available to help you succeed in the course.


MATH 156 – Applied Honors Calculus II (MSA, QR/1)
Sections: 001 - 006
MATH 156 is part of the applied Honors calculus sequence for engineering and science majors. Applications and concepts receive equal treatment. Theorems are stated precisely and are derived, but technical details are omitted. Examples are given to illustrate the theory. Critical thinking and class participation are encouraged. The goal is to provide students with the solid background needed for subsequent courses in mathematics, engineering, and science.


MATH 175 – An Introduction to Cryptology (MSA, QR/1)
Section: 001, 002
This course is an alternative to Math 185 as an entry to the honors calculus sequence. The course stresses discovery as a vehicle for learning. This is an IBL course, where students will be required to work in groups and experiment in class. The course has two different aspects, namely class time (twice a week) and lab time (once a week). Grades will be based on worksheets, homework and class participation, with a strong emphasis on homework. Personal computers will be a valuable experimental tool in this course and students will be asked to learn to program in one of MATHEMATICA or SAGE. Moreover, for the write-up of the worksheets, the use of LaTeX is highly recommended, but not required.


MATH 185 – Honors Calculus I (MSA, QR/1)
Section: 001
Most students take calculus in high school, and it may seem that there isn't much new to learn. The goal of this course is to develop the familiar concepts of calculus using a more rigorous and theoretical approach. In particular, with its emphasis on how to use appropriate mathematical language, this course lays a solid foundation for future math courses, and is suitable for students intending to pursue a major in mathematics, science, or engineering who desire a more complete understanding of the underpinnings of calculus. This sequence is not restricted to students enrolled in the LSA Honors Program.

 

MATH 285 – Honors Multivariable and Vector Calculus (MSA, QR/1)

Section: 001, 002, 003
The sequence Math 185-186-285-286 is an introduction to calculus at the honors level. It is taken by students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields who want a somewhat more theoretical approach. Although much attention is paid to concepts and solving problems, the underlying theory and proofs of important results are also included. This sequence is not restricted to students enrolled in the LSA Honors Program.


MATH 286 – Honors Differential Equations (MSA, QR/1)
Section: 001
The sequence Math 185-186-285-286 is an introduction to calculus at the honors level. It is taken by students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields who want a somewhat more theoretical approach. Although much attention is paid to concepts and solving problems, the underlying theory and proofs of important results are also included. This sequence is not restricted to students enrolled in the LSA Honors Program.

 

MATH 295 – Honors Mathematics I (MSA, QR/1)
Section: 001, 002
Math 295-296-395-396 is the most theoretical and demanding honors math sequence. The emphasis is on concepts, problem solving, as well as the underlying theory and proofs of important results. It provides an excellent background for advanced courses in mathematics. The expected background is high school trigonometry and algebra (previous calculus is not required, but is helpful.) This sequence is not restricted to students enrolled in the LS&A Honors program. Math 295 and 296 may be substituted for any Math 451 requirement. Math 296 and 395 may be substituted for any Math 217 requirement.

For more information on these courses, please visit the Department of Mathematics webpage


PHIL 296 - Honors Introduction to Logic (MSA, QR/1)
Section: 001
Logic, as we will understand it, is the study of certain patterns of inference, and of how we can distinguish good inferences from bad ones. Formal logic involves approaching these questions with the help of precise formal languages. We will cover two such languages in this course: the language of propositional logic and the language of predicate logic. By the end of the semester, you'll master two different approaches for evaluating arguments translated into these languages: the model-theoretic (semantic) approach and the proof-theoretic (syntactic) approach. Along the way, we’ll explore related philosophical puzzles and controversies, as well as connections to more advanced topics (eg. non-classical logics and modal logic).


PHYSICS 160 – Honors Physics I (NS, QR/1)
Section: 001
PHYSICS 160 covers the fundamental principles of mechanics using a modern perspective and is intended for students who have had significant exposure to physics at the high school level and/or have AP credit for physics. It emphasizes the applicability of these laws in systems ranging from binary stars to nuclear collisions. This class will be different, and more interesting, than any physics course you have taken yet.
The goals of the course are:
1. Application of fundamental principles to a wide range of systems, i.e., from nuclei to stars (unify mechanics)
2. Integrate contemporary physics (atomic models of matter, relativistic dynamics)
3. Engage students in physical modeling (idealization, approximation, assumptions, estimation)
4. Integrate computational physics (now a partner of theory and experiment) into problem solving


PHYSICS 161 – Honors Introductory Mechanics Lab (NS)
Section: 001, 002, 003
PHYSICS 161 is a three-hour weekly laboratory designed to accompany PHYSICS 160.
This lab introduces students to the core concepts of physics, namely careful observations, both quantitative and qualitative, followed by comparison with appropriate mathematical models that serve as the basis for descriptive interpretation. Course material is focused on developing a good understanding of the concepts and principles of Newtonian mechanics while providing sophisticated experiments for demonstrating the validity of these fundamental paradigms.


PHYSICS 260 – Honors Physics II (NS, QR/1)
Section: 001
PHYSICS 260 is a continuation of PHYSICS 160 and introduces the theory of electromagnetic phenomena. This course will introduce you to:
1. The deeper physical meaning of the concepts
2. A rigorous mathematical approach, using vector calculus when applicable
3. Problem solving including computer use
4. Contemporary applications
If you like physics and math, appreciate the deeper meaning and derivation of concepts and equations, and if you like to do problems, you are in the right course.


PHYSICS 261 – Honors Electricity and Magnetism Lab (NS)
Section: 001
PHYSICS 261 is a three-hour weekly laboratory designed to accompany PHYSICS 260. This lab introduces students to the core concepts of physics, namely careful observations, both quantitative and qualitative, followed by comparison with appropriate mathematical models that serve as the basis for descriptive interpretation. Course material is focused on developing a good understanding of the concepts and principles of Newtonian mechanics while providing sophisticated experiments for demonstrating the validity of these fundamental paradigms. The analytical techniques require high school level algebra and some familiarity with statistical measures of significance, procedures common to any scientific, technical, or medical area of inquiry. Although not an academic requirement, it is assumed that the students will have some basic skills in using a computer at the level of a word processing program or similar application task.


PSYCH 114–Honors Introduction to Psychology
Section: 001
Instructor: Twila Tardif
This course is designed to introduce Honors students to contemporary psychology. At the end of this class, the student should realize that psychological research addresses a wide range of issues, and that the methods used to study these issues are equally numerous. In order to achieve these objectives, this course will cover a broad range of topics:
I. Part one is a general introduction to psychology (definitions, history, methods).
II. In Part two, we will look at psychology on four levels of analysis, namely
a. on a biological level (nervous system, behavioral genetics, and evolutionary psychology),
b. a "basic processes" level (perception, learning, memory, information processing, motivation, and emotion),
c. on a level considering the person as a unit (development, personality theories, psychopathology, treatment of mental disorders), and finally,
d. on a "social / cultural" level, which focuses on understanding the individual in a social / cultural context (social cognition, social influence, social interaction: intragroup and inter group processes.).
III. In Part three, we will study one specific problem, namely stress in college, and how psychologists study this problem
a. on a biological level (stress and health, sleep, eating behavior),
b. on a basic process level,
c. on a person-centered level (are there personal styles that might make coping with stress easier?), and
d. on a social level (how does social support influence our adjustment to stress?).


STATS 280 – Honors Introduction to Statistics and Data Analysis (MSA, QR/1)
Section: 001 (LEC), 002, 004 (LAB)
STATS 280 will provide in-depth discussion of models and methods that are appropriate to specific situations, criteria for selecting among them, their strengths and weaknesses and their conceptual footing. Interactive learning will be emphasized in lectures and the laboratory module. During the lab, students will learn to use modern statistical software for visualization and data analysis, and carry out the computational parts of lab assignments.
STATS 280 includes derivations of basic statistical results such as expected values and sampling variances using techniques from pre-calculus mathematics. Students will also be expected to master quantitative relationships such as scaling relationships between variances, sample sizes, and standard errors.
Definition and summary of univariate and bivariate data, distributions, correlation, and associated visualization techniques; randomization in comparative studies and in survey sampling; basic probability calculus, including conditional probabilities, concept of random variables and their properties; sampling distributions and the central limit theorem; statistical inference, including hypothesis tests, confidence intervals; one sample and two sample problems with binary and continuous data, including nonparametric procedures; analysis of variance; simple and bivariate regression; simple design of experiments; chisquare and rank-based tests for association and independence.

 

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