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Current Students

Questions regarding academics during COVID-19? Click here.

As the situation develops, we are compiling a complete list of Honors COVID-19 FAQ. Topics range from Courses, Registrations & Transcripts through Graduation. It's conveniently anchored, so that you can hyperjump to your item of interest. 

LINK TO Honors COVID-19 FAQ

 

Current students will find answers here to questions about academic requirements, housing, scholarships and grants, as well as many of the forms necessary to process student records.

Use the Make an Advising Appointment button, above, to schedule your own advising appointments. All advisors are skilled in the many majors and tracks LSA Honors students pursue. If you have a regular advisor, you may seek by the name, or you may seek appointment availability by date, day, or time. 

At the bottom of the page, the Quick Links will connect you to frequently visited areas in the Current Students section of our website. You will also find forms, scholarship and grant information, housing details, and more, from the buttons in the task bar on the left. If you have additional questions, please email ask.honors@umich.edu.

The Atlas Schedule Builder is a useful course scheduling tool for students. Check out this Quick Start Guide or the Atlas Schedule Builder:  Walkthrough Tutorial for more information.

PLEASE NOTE:  When browsing in the Course Guide, the number of available seats in a section is listed in the Open Seats column. The number of seats in the Open Restricted Seats column does not always reflect the actual number of open seats. 

Honors Core Curriculum for Winter 2023

Use the link below to read the full LSA Course Guide description of the course. 

Please note:  The course descriptions in the Atlas Course Profile tool may not be up-to-date. Refer to the LSA Course Guide for the most current course descriptions.

 

Honors 231 / Playing Fair:  Sports, Gender, & Disability (HU)

Honors Mini-Courses for First-Year Students

No Honors mini-courses scheduled for Winter 2023

Honors Seminars

No Honors seminar courses scheduled for Winter 2023.

Departmental Honors Courses for Winter 2023

By selecting Honors under Special Offerings in the LSA Course Guide, students will find a fairly comprehensive list of Honors courses available for the term. Depending on course coding used by the department, you may find other courses throughout a search, but this is a great start in planning your schedule.

 

ANTHRCUL 258 – Honors Seminar in Anthropology
Section: 001 Culture and Medicine, not open to first-year students
This seminar will examine the ways in which cultures and medical practices are entangled with each other. We will focus on a variety of healing traditions, from a range of temporal and geographic locations. These will include Western biomedicine, Chinese and Ayurvedic “traditional” medicine, and medical science from the former Soviet Union. A key question we will ask throughout the seminar is: how is medical knowledge historically produced? This question will help us think through illness experiences, the pursuit of cures, and questions of science and embodiment in a time of planetary environmental changes. Readings will grapple with culturally-salient phenomena such as personhood and collective memory; social deprivation; technoscientific advancement; and medical pluralism.

BIOLOGY 171 – Introductory Biology: Ecology and Evolution (NS)
Section: 002 (LEC), 201 (DIS) LSA HNRS
BIOLOGY 171 is a one-term course in ecology and evolutionary biology that, together with BIOLOGY 172 and 173, collectively form the introductory biology course unit.
The primary aims of BIOLOGY 171 are:
1. to provide factual and conceptual knowledge concerning the origin and complex interactions of the Earth's biodiversity
2. to give an integrated overview of biological organization including genes, individuals, kin groups, populations, species, communities, and ecosystems
3. to engage with biological hypotheses dealing with prominent current issues such as human evolutionary origins, emerging diseases, conservation biology and global change
4. to develop critical-thinking and writing skills.
Topics in BIOLOGY 171 are divided among three primary areas:
• Inheritance genetics and evolution
• Biodiversity, organismal biology
• Ecology

BIOLOGY 172 – Introductory Biology – Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental (NS)
Section: 002 (LEC), 200, 201 (DIS) LSA HNRS
BIOLOGY 172 is a one-term course in molecular, cellular, and developmental biology that, together with BIOLOGY 171 and 173, collectively forms the introductory biology course sequence.
The aims of BIOLOGY 172 are:
• to provide factual and conceptual knowledge of how cells, organs, and organisms work; and
• to develop scientific hypothesis-testing and critical-thinking skills.

 

CHEM 215 – Structure and Reactivity II (NS) 
Section: 200 (LEC)
CHEM 215 is the second course in a two-term sequence in which the major concepts of chemistry are introduced in the context of organic chemistry. Emphasis is on the development of the capacity of students to think about the relationship between structure and reactivity and to solve problems in a qualitatively analytical way. Many of the topics are presented from a bioorganic perspective, and so the course is relevant to many bio-x perspectives. The honors section of this course (section 200) integrates the content of Chem 215H and 216H over four lectures per week by the two instructors. Additionally, there is a required structured study group (SSG) component (evening slots with sign-up options to be provided in class) with an end-of-term assignment that is included in the course grade.

Note:  SECTION 200 IS AVAILABLE FOR HONORS CREDIT ONLY. DEPARTMENTAL CONSENT MUST BE GIVEN. STUDENTS IN CHEM 215H-200 MUST ALSO ELECT CHEM 216H-200. Contact chemundergrad@umich.edu with questions.

*Two ways to receive Honors credit in CHEM 215
        1. Elect any CHEM 215 section (including non-Honors) and join an Honors Structured Study Group (SSG). (3 Honors engagement points for Sophomore Honors Award)
        2. Be accepted into Honors CHEM 215-200 AND Honors CHEM 216-200 with 2xx lab + join a structured study group (SSG). (5 Honors engagement points for Sophomore Honors Award)

 

CHEM 216 – Synthesis and Characterization of Organic Compounds (NS)
Section: 200 (LEC), 210 - 250 (LAB)
CHEM 216 builds on the experimental approach started in CHEM 211. Students participate in planning exactly what they are going to do in the laboratory by being given general goals and directions that have to be adapted to fit the specific project they will be working on. They use microscale equipment, which requires them to develop manual dexterity and care in working in the laboratory. They also evaluate the results of their experiments by checking for identity and purity using various chromatographic and spectroscopic methods. Students should elect both CHEM 215 Honors - section 200 (for 3 credits) and CHEM 216 Honors - section 200 (for 2 credits).

Note: CHEM 216, section 200 and 2xx labs available for Honors credit only. Departmental Consent must be given BEFORE registering. Students must also be enrolled in Chem 215-200. Double honors will be given upon successful completion. Contact chemundergrad@umich.edu with questions.

Honors option for CHEM 230 and CHEM 260Compute to Learn

For further information, please contact the Chemistry Undergraduate Office at chemundergrad@umich.edu.

 

ECON 102 – Principles of Economics II (SS, QR2)
Section: 100 (LEC), 107 (DISC) LSA HNRS
In ECON 102, the fundamental concepts and theories of macroeconomics are developed and used to analyze problems of current interest.
Major topics include
• the determinants of aggregate output,
• employment and unemployment,
• inflation,
• the balance of international trade, and
• economic growth.

GEOG 145/INTLSTD 101 Crosslisted– Introduction to International Studies (SS)
Section: 001 (LEC), 003 (DIS) LSA HNRS   
This is the introductory core course for the International Studies major at the University of Michigan. The course explores human rights, human development and human security in historical and comparative perspective using multiple disciplinary approaches. The curriculum is divided into six modules that cover:
• globalization;
• international relations and organizations;
• human rights and humanitarianism;
• global environment and health;
• human development; and
• culture and identity.
Honors:
Students in the Honors section will have discussions with the primary instructor for the course. These discussions will address special topics that build on material covered in lecture, and enable the students to explore key topics of international significance in more depth.
Students in the Honors section will also write a longer paper and make one short presentation to their group.

 

MATH 176 – Explorations in Calculus (MSA, QR/1)
Section: 001 
This course is an Inquiry-Based version of Honors Calculus I and II (such as Math 185/186) and provides the necessary preparation for Multivariable Calculus (Math 215 or the honors version, Math 285). A student who has had some exposure to calculus (e.g., AB or BC in high school, or Math 115) will be well-prepared for this course. The majority of class time will be spent working in groups and presenting ideas and solutions to problems.

MATH 186 – Honors Calculus II (MSA, QR/1)
Section: 001
Most students take calculus in high school, and it may seem that there isn't much new to learn. The goal of this course is to develop the familiar concepts of calculus using a more rigorous and theoretical approach. In particular, with its emphasis on how to use appropriate mathematical language, this course lays a solid foundation for future math courses, and is suitable for students intending to pursue a major in mathematics, science, or engineering who desire a more complete understanding of the underpinnings of calculus. This sequence is not restricted to students enrolled in the LSA Honors Program. This course is a continuation of Math 185.

MATH 285 – Honors Multivariable and Vector Calculus (MSA, QR/1)
Section: 001
The sequence Math 185-186-285-286 is an introduction to calculus at the honors level. It is taken by students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields who want a somewhat more theoretical approach. Although much attention is paid to concepts and solving problems, the underlying theory and proofs of important results are also included. This sequence is not restricted to students enrolled in the LSA Honors Program.

MATH 286 – Honors Differential Equations (MSA, QR/1)
Section: 001
The sequence Math 185-186-285-286 is an introduction to calculus at the honors level. It is taken by students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields who want a somewhat more theoretical approach. Although much attention is paid to concepts and solving problems, the underlying theory and proofs of important results are also included. This sequence is not restricted to students enrolled in the LSA Honors Program.

MATH 296 – Honors Mathematics II (QR/1)
Section: 001
Math 295-296-395-396 is the most theoretical and demanding honors calculus sequence. The emphasis is on concepts, problem solving, as well as the underlying theory and proofs of important results. It provides an excellent background for advanced courses in mathematics. The expected background is high school trigonometry and algebra (previous calculus is not required, but is helpful.) This sequence is not restricted to students enrolled in the LSA Honors program. Math 295 and 296 may be substituted for any Math 451 requirement. Math 296 and 395 may be substituted for any Math 217 requirement.

MATH 297 – An Introduction to Analysis (MSA, QR/1)
Section: 001
This is a course in analysis for students who know how to write rigorous mathematical arguments and possess a firm understanding of the standard concepts of linear algebra. It is specifically designed for students who excelled in Math 217, love mathematics, and wish to transition into the Honors Analysis Sequence.

For more information on Math courses, please visit the Department of Mathematics webpage. For waitlist information for Math courses, contact the Math department at math-undergrad-office@umich.edu.

 

PHIL 297 – Honors Introduction to Philosophy (HU)
Section: 001
This course will serve as a small-group discussion-based introduction to philosophy. We will survey a number of central philosophical questions having to do with the self, the world, the possibility of knowledge, the existence of free will and our moral obligations. While working through both historical and contemporary work on these topics, we’ll also focus on learning key skills, such as understanding and evaluating others’ arguments, constructing persuasive arguments of one’s own, and writing successful philosophy papers.

PHYSICS 160 – Honors Physics I (NS, QR/1)
Section: 001
PHYSICS 160 covers the fundamental principles of mechanics using a modern perspective and is intended for students who have had significant exposure to physics at the high school level and/or have AP credit for physics. It emphasizes the applicability of these laws in systems ranging from binary stars to nuclear collisions. This class will be different, and more interesting, than any physics course you have taken yet.
The goals of the course are:
1. Application of fundamental principles to a wide range of systems, i.e., from nuclei to stars (unify mechanics)
2. Integrate contemporary physics (atomic models of matter, relativistic dynamics)
3. Engage students in physical modeling (idealization, approximation, assumptions, estimation)
4. Integrate computational physics (now a partner of theory and experiment) into problem solving

Students should elect PHYSICS 161 as the corresponding LAB section.

PHYSICS 161 – Honors Introductory Mechanics Lab (NS)
Section: 001
PHYSICS 161 is a three-hour weekly laboratory designed to accompany PHYSICS 160.
This lab introduces students to the core concepts of physics, namely careful observations, both quantitative and qualitative, followed by comparison with appropriate mathematical models that serve as the basis for descriptive interpretation. Course material is focused on developing a good understanding of the concepts and principles of Newtonian mechanics while providing sophisticated experiments for demonstrating the validity of these fundamental paradigms.

PHYSICS 260 – Honors Physics II (NS, QR/1)
Section: 001
PHYSICS 260 is a continuation of PHYSICS 160 and introduces the theory of electromagnetic phenomena. This course will introduce you to:
1. The deeper physical meaning of the concepts
2. A rigorous mathematical approach, using vector calculus when applicable
3. Problem solving including computer use
4. Contemporary applications
If you like physics and math, appreciate the deeper meaning and derivation of concepts and equations, and if you like to do problems, you are in the right course. Students should elect PHYSICS 261 as the corresponding Lab section for the course.

PHYSICS 261 – Honors Electricity and Magnetism Lab (NS)
Section: 001, 002
PHYSICS 261 is a three-hour weekly laboratory designed to accompany PHYSICS 260. This lab introduces students to the core concepts of physics, namely careful observations, both quantitative and qualitative, followed by comparison with appropriate mathematical models that serve as the basis for descriptive interpretation. Course material is focused on developing a good understanding of the concepts and principles of Newtonian mechanics while providing sophisticated experiments for demonstrating the validity of these fundamental paradigms. The analytical techniques require high school level algebra and some familiarity with statistical measures of significance, procedures common to any scientific, technical, or medical area of inquiry. Although not an academic requirement, it is assumed that the students will have some basic skills in using a computer at the level of a word processing program or similar application task.

PSYCH 120 – First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science (SS)
Section: 010 What Makes Life Worth Living?
This first-year seminar addresses the topic of what makes life worth living. This course will draw on positive psychology as well as allied work in various disciplines to address these common themes of the good life. In this seminar course, students will learn about the science and art of life worth living by examining research findings as well as specific practices that build and promote happy, healthy and meaningful life.
 

STATS 280 – Honors Introduction to Statistics and Data Analysis (MSA, QR/1)
Section: 001 (LEC), 002, 003 (LAB)
STATS 280 will provide in-depth discussion of models and methods that are appropriate to specific situations, criteria for selecting among them, their strengths and weaknesses and their conceptual footing. Interactive learning will be emphasized in lectures and the laboratory module. During the lab, students will learn to use modern statistical software for visualization and data analysis, and carry out the computational parts of lab assignments.
STATS 280 includes derivations of basic statistical results such as expected values and sampling variances using techniques from pre-calculus mathematics. Students will also be expected to master quantitative relationships such as scaling relationships between variances, sample sizes, and standard errors.
Definition and summary of univariate and bivariate data, distributions, correlation, and associated visualization techniques; randomization in comparative studies and in survey sampling; basic probability calculus, including conditional probabilities, concept of random variables and their properties; sampling distributions and the central limit theorem; statistical inference, including hypothesis tests, confidence intervals; one sample and two sample problems with binary and continuous data, including nonparametric procedures; analysis of variance; simple and bivariate regression; simple design of experiments; chisquare and rank-based tests for association and independence.

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