Skip to Content

Search: {{$root.lsaSearchQuery.q}}, Page {{$root.page}}

DEI Support Resources for Students

On-Campus Resources

Non-traditional, transfer, and disabled student resources

  • Center for Education of Women+ (CEW+)--"At CEW+, we navigate circumstantial barriers by providing academic, financial, and professional support to help you reach your personal potential. Established to support women through higher education, we lift up women and all underserved communities at U-M and beyond. Through career and education counseling, funding, workshops, events, and a diverse, welcoming community, we exist to empower. We are CEW+, and we’re here to help you reach your potential."

  • LSA Transfer Student Center--"resources and staff just for transfer students. The center includes both a comprehensive website (you found it!) and a dedicated space in the newly renovated LSA Building. Our goal is to make your transfer experience as smooth as possible, so you can spend more time on academic pursuits and less time on administrative policies."

  • Transfer Connections Mentorship Program--"Transfer Connections provides an opportunity for new LSA transfer students to connect with peer mentors, who are former transfer students, in order to ease the transition from your former college or university into Michigan. Transfer Connections helps to make the University a smaller place, provides support and guidance, and helps students build relationships on campus.

  • First Generation at University of Michigan--“This website seeks to provide first-generation students at the University of Michigan with resources, insight and inspiration that can help you thrive and succeed on campus as you pursue your degree.”

  • Megan Fairchild Resource Guide

  • Services for Students with Disabilities--“Services for Students with Disabilities partners with faculty and staff at the University of Michigan to promote inclusive course design as well as implement reasonable accommodations for disabled students at the University of Michigan.”

Identity affirming campus entities and student organizations

There are countless student organizations and offices at University of Michigan, but we wanted to highlight a few that may be particularly helpful:

  • Spectrum Center (LGTBQIA Student Support)--"With sexual orientation, gender identity and gender expression as our framework, the Spectrum Center is committed to enriching the campus experience and developing students as individuals and as members of communities. Our work is accomplished through a student-centered, intersectional lens.The Center envisions an inclusive campus community free of discrimination in all forms where social justice inspires community engagement and equity."

  • Trotter Multicultural Center--"As a national leader in promoting an inclusive campus climate, the Trotter Multicultural Center serves as a campus facilitator, convener, and coordinator of intercultural engagement and inclusive leadership education initiatives for University of Michigan students."

  • Women in Science and Engineering (WISE)--"The University of Michigan Women in Science and Engineering (WISE) unit aims to increase the number of girls and women pursuing degrees and careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics while fostering their future success. The University of Michigan is at the forefront of equality in science and engineering. The U-M focus on diversity, equity, and inclusion covers not just women, but specifically minoritized women- women of color, LGBT women, and women who are first generation in higher education, to name a few. WISE does not limit our programming by identity and fosters the success of students anywhere on the gender spectrum."

  • LGTBQ Student Groups 

  • Asian American Student Organizations

  • Black Uplift: Black and African American Student Organizations

  • Indian Student Association

Weinberg Institute resources

  • Peer Facilitators--Peer facilitators are upper-level Cognitive Science students who support their peers through:
    Increasing awareness about the CogSci major on campus
    Helping undeclared students explore whether or not CogSci is a good fit
    Creating a sense of community amongst declared CogSci students
    Answering curriculum/class registration questions for their peers
    Working with their peers on decisions about the future, and the best way to market CogSci as they pursue grad school, internships, or jobs
    Offering strategies to support their peers in time management and studying
    Sharing the student perspective with their peers on courses and opportunities such as research and study abroad

  • Newsletter--our monthly newsletter highlights diversity in Cognitive Science as well as sharing campus resources and events relevant to cognitive scientists! Send us an email to weinberg-institute@umich.edu if you would like to be added to our newsletter list

  • Webinars--we have a comprehensive webinar page where we cover topics such as course registration, honors, independent study, research, and more!

  • Cognitive Science Community--"Cognitive Science Community is a student organization dedicated to understanding the mind through exploration, discussion, and the integration of fields including, but not limited to, Psychology, Linguistics, Neuroscience, Computer Science, Economics, Anthropology, and Philosophy."


And as always, you are welcome to come to advising to discuss all these resources and more! You may also send us an email at Weinberg-Institute@umich.edu.

Off-Campus Resources

Resources for Women

Women in Cognitive Science (WiCS)

From their website: "[WiCS seeks] to:

  • Improve the visibility of women by ensuring that they are included on editorial boards, influential committees, visible positions in professional organizations, etc.

  • Create an environment that encourages young women to join the field of cognitive psychology/science, particularly in cognitive neuroscience and computational modeling areas.

  • Provide support and training with regard to dealing with administration at home universities.

  • Assist with professional development in the field.

  • Provide contacts with other women in science in the states and abroad.”

Women in Computer Science and Technology Resources

Association for Women in Computing (AWC)

From their website: “The Association for Women in Computing (AWC) was founded in Washington, D.C. in 1978 and is one of the first professional organizations for women in computing. AWC is dedicated to promoting the advancement of women in the computing professions. Our members include many types of computer professionals, such as programmers, system analysts, operators, technical writers, Internet specialists, trainers and consultants.”

National Center for Women & Information Technology

From their website: “The National Center for Women & Information Technology (NCWIT) is a non-profit community of 1,400 universities, companies, non-profits, and government organizations nationwide working to increase girls’ and women’s meaningful participation in computing. NCWIT equips change leaders with resources for taking action in recruiting, retaining, and advancing women across the entire computing ecosystem (K-12 through career).”

Women in AI

From their website: “Women in AI (WAI) is a nonprofit do-tank working towards gender-inclusive AI that benefits global society. Our mission is to increase female representation and participation in AI. We are a community-driven initiative bringing empowerment, knowledge and active collaboration via education, research, events, and blogging.

blackgirlscode.com

From their website: “Our Vision [is to] increase the number of women of color in the digital space by empowering girls of color ages 7 to 17 to become innovators in STEM fields, leaders in their communities, and builders of their own futures through exposure to computer science and technology. To provide African-American youth with the skills to occupy some of the 1.4 million computing job openings expected to be available in the U.S. by 2020, and to train 1 million girls by 2040.”

Full Stack Academy: 15 Tech Organizations Actively Supporting Black Coders

IEEE Women in Computing Resource Page

CIO article “16 organizations for women in tech”

Women in Linguistics Resources

Women in Linguistics Mentoring Alliance

From their website: “This project provides women in linguistics with mentors to help them with professional development skills and advice at all stages of their careers: from undergraduates to women in senior positions.”

Committee on Gender Equity in Linguistics

From their website: “The work of the Committee includes, but is not limited to, the following:

  • Monitoring and advancing the status of women in linguistics.

  • Proposing to the Executive Committee LSA policies regarding the rights, opportunities, and needs of women in linguistics, as well as evaluating said policies.

  • Maintaining liaison with other organizations concerned with gender diversity and equality in linguistics and allied fields and investigating possibilities for cooperating with such groups on specific projects.

  • Advocating for the Society's Guidelines for Inclusive Language, proposing revisions or additions to the Executive Committee as deemed appropriate.

  • Organizing professional development programming to assist women in advancing their careers as linguists.

  • Encouraging research on language and gender, as well as gender and sexuality.”

Women in Philosophy Resources

The Society for Women in Philosophy

From their website: “The Society for Women in Philosophy was started in 1972 to promote and support women in philosophy. SWIP holds divisional meetings, meetings in conjunction with the meetings of the American Philosophical Association, and it publishes newsletters.”

Collegium of Black Women Philosophers

From their website: “The Collegium of Black Women Philosophers (CBWP) is a philosophical organization whose purpose is to encourage and foster a networking and mentoring relationship between the underrepresented Black women in philosophy including undergraduate students and graduate students as well as assistant, associate, and full professors in the Academy.  The objective of the CBWP is to mentor and retain the Black women who are currently professors or graduate students in philosophy while simultaneously recruiting more Black women into the discipline.”

The International Association of Women Philosophers

From their website: “The International Association of Women Philosophers is a professional association and network that provides a forum for discussion, interaction and cooperation among women engaged in teaching and research in all aspects of philosophy, with a particular emphasis on feminist philosophy. Founded in 1976 in Würzburg (Germany) as “Association of Women Philosophers” (APh), the IAPh has gradually grown into an international organization with members all over the world. Currently the IAPh has more than 380 members from more than 35 different countries.”

Our Map for The Gap (MAP)

From their website: “MAP’s mission is to address structural injustices in academic philosophy and to remove barriers that impede participation in academic philosophy for members of marginalized groups. Through our international organizing team and graduate student-led network of autonomous chapters around the world, we aim to examine and dismantle mechanisms that prevent students from marginalized groups from participating in academic philosophy, as well as to promote philosophical work done from marginalized perspectives, and help improve working conditions for scholars from marginalized backgrounds.”

Women in Psychology Resources

Association for Women in Psychology

From their website: “The Association for Women in Psychology (AWP) is an interdisciplinary organization that attends to issues and concerns at the intersections of feminism and psychology. The annual national AWP conference is the catalyst that brings together activists, students, academics, clinicians, government and policy workers, researchers, and folks from the nonprofit sector (among many others!) for a weekend of working towards building feminist community and connection, and exciting exchanges of dialogue, ideas, and social actions.”

Society for the Psychology of Women

From their website: “Division 35: Society for the Psychology of Women provides an organizational base for all feminists, of all genders and of all national origins, who are interested in teaching, research, or practice in the psychology of women.”

APA Women’s Programs Office

From their website: “[The office for] improving the status, health and well-being of women psychologists and consumers of psychological services, and addressing issues such as gender disparities, domestic violence, disabilities and depression.”

 

Resources for BIPoC Students

The Spark Society

From their website: “The SPARK Society was founded by Duane G. Watson (Vanderbilt University), Jean E. Fox Tree (UC Santa Cruz), Alejandro Lleras (University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign), and Ayanna K. Thomas (Tufts University) in 2017. The mission of SPARK is to increase the numbers of Black/African Americans, Latinx, and Native Americans in cognitive psychology, cognitive science, linguistics, and cognitive neuroscience. Our mission is to create a national network for undergraduates, graduate students, postdoctoral scholars, and faculty.”

Society for Black Brain and Behavioral Scientists

From their website: “The overarching goal for the Society for Black Brain and Behavioral Scientists is to become a large member-based organization that provides programming and services to its members as well as the larger community.  We would like to expand to a full fleet of programming and services including an annual academic conference, scholarships and grants, an in-house job portal, academic and wellness support for students, workshops, and networking events.  Other plans for expansion include skills training and local community awareness events.  Increased membership is a continual goal since we want to increase the number of black scientists in the field!”

Black Women in Science and Engineering (BWISE)

From their website: “This is a group to empower and develop Black women who have degrees in the sciences, math and engineering (even if you no longer work in that field) and who would like to connect with others. If you want to share career experiences and be encouraged by your sisters, then this is the group for you. We will focus on moving our careers forward through personal and professional development as well as industry networking and entrepreneurship.”

National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering

From their website: “Our Mission: to enrich society with an American workforce that champions diversity in STEM by increasing the number of underrepresented minorities in engineering and computer science.”

The Association of Black Psychologists

From their website: “The Association of Black Psychologists was founded in San Francisco in 1968 by a number of Black Psychologists from across the country. They united to actively address the serious problems facing Black Psychologists and the larger Black community. Guided by the principle of self-determination, these psychologists and students set about building an institution through which they could address the long-neglected needs of Black professionals. Their goal was to have a positive impact upon the mental health of the national Black community by means of planning, programs, services, training, and advocacy. 

National Association for Black Speech-Language and Hearing

From their website: “The mission of the National Black Association for Speech-Language and Hearing is to maintain a viable mechanism through which the needs of black professionals, students and individuals with communication disorders can be met.”

Academics for Black Survival and Wellness

From their website: “Academics for Black Survival and Wellness (A4BL) is a personal and professional development initiative for Non-Black academics to honor the toll of racial trauma on Black people, resist anti-Blackness and white supremacy, and facilitate accountability and collective action. A4BL also is a space for healing and wellness for Black people.”

Our Map for The Gap (MAP)

From their website: “MAP’s mission is to address structural injustices in academic philosophy and to remove barriers that impede participation in academic philosophy for members of marginalized groups. Through our international organizing team and graduate student-led network of autonomous chapters around the world, we aim to examine and dismantle mechanisms that prevent students from marginalized groups from participating in academic philosophy, as well as to promote philosophical work done from marginalized perspectives, and help improve working conditions for scholars from marginalized backgrounds.”

Collegium of Black Women Philosophers

From their website: “The Collegium of Black Women Philosophers (CBWP) is a philosophical organization whose purpose is to encourage and foster a networking and mentoring relationship between the underrepresented Black women in philosophy including undergraduate students and graduate students as well as assistant, associate, and full professors in the Academy.  The objective of the CBWP is to mentor and retain the Black women who are currently professors or graduate students in philosophy while simultaneously recruiting more Black women into the discipline.”

APA Ethnicity, Race, and Cultural Affairs Portfolio

From their website: “The Ethnicity, Race, and Cultural Affairs Portfolio seeks to increase scientific understanding of how psychology pertains to both race/ethnicity and culture.”