Frequent Feedback

Providing students with frequent feedback helps them understand whether they’re learning what they need to.
by Elizabeth Fomin

Providing students with frequent feedback helps them understand whether they’re learning what they need to (1). This does not have to be formal, graded feedback. Feedback can take the form of  an instructor-led class discussion, commentary on an exercise, or a small weekly recap. You can also use technology to help you.

Weekly recaps can be sent through Canvas Announcements. You can even set the publish date for the end of the week and work on the recap post itself throughout the week, adding to it after each class session or discussion section to capture your ongoing thoughts about how students are doing with the material and what additional guidance or information they might need.

If you run out of class time but would like to expand on a topic discussed during class you might create a short video, recorded in Canvas using the Media Gallery’s Express Capture option. This can be a lively and engaging way to give feedback on discussion points that you may have had to pass over during class time.

A reading or slide can be collaboratively annotated using Perusall, or further discussed using YellowDig or Canvas Discussions. These tools can engage students outside of class time, and allow you to observe and give feedback on student responses. If you would like to learn more about how to use Canvas, Perusall, or YellowDig to provide feedback, contact LTC for a consultation.

  1. Chickering, A. W. & Gamson, Z. F. (1987) Seven principles for good practice in undergraduate education. AAHE (American Association for Higher Education) Bulletin,39. (7), 3-7.

Release Date:
09/17/2019
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