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Past Events

O CORPO NA DIÁSPORA: BODY, DIASPORA, AUTONOMY AND POWER
LUCIANE RAMOS SILVA

Through a mixture of talk and workshop, Luciane discussed creative proposals of Brazilian women artists, whose reflections point to understand dance and performance as areas of production of knowledge in light of the political and social urgencies of our times. Among the topics that these women artists deal with are women incarceration, self-care and healing and the condition of nonnormative bodies.

Hostile Terrain: Exploring Border Security and Migration in 2019

Hostile Terrain is a Pop-UP Exhibition about America's Humanitarian Crisis at the Southern Border. This participatory political art project is organized by the Undocumented Migration Project (UMP), a non-profit research-art-education-media collective, directed by associate professor of anthropology Jason De León. 

Black God, White Devil: Herzog and the Slavery Film
Professor Joshua Lund, University of Notre Dame

What are the dominant relations between race, capitalism and history in the slavery film? In this lecture Lund explored the possibilities and limits of this question, with special attention paid to Werner Herzog's unusual contribution to the genre, Cobra Verde (1987).

VISIBILITY IN EDUCATION: TEACHING ARGENTINA’S BLACK HISTORY
Afro-Argentine Organization: Agrupación Xangô

This event gave a brief historical overview of African migrations in Argentina and the current situation of African and Afrodescendant migrants and refugees in Argentina and their main tensions: Racism, Discrimination and Xenophobia. 

Agrupación Xangô is a dynamic Afro-Argentine association whose mission is to forge bonds with international groups, promote the visibility of Afro-descendants, enhance global scholarship, and advocate for social justice and human rights in Argentina and throughout the African diaspora. 

Trumped Up: Combating Misinformation about LatinUs and Our Language(s)
Ana Celia Zentella, Professor Emerita (University of California/San Diego and Hunter College/ CUNY)

In her talk, Prof. Zentella discussed recent debates about language, truth, facts, news, and the rise of linguistic intolerance and hate crimes. As she indicates, “An anthro-political linguistic perspective helps us understand the recent attacks on speakers of other languages by the general public, employers, teachers, judges, senators, and by the President and his advisors, by explaining how racial ideologies of superiority/inferiority and purity/contamination have been remapped from biology onto language, with damaging repercussions for the education, employment, and safety of people of color who speak varied languages.”

Can Our Black Lives Matter If Our Languages Do Not Matter?
Professor Michel DeGraff, Director of MIT-Haiti Initiative

Martin Luther King Jr's dream through the lens of linguistics and education. This event was made possible through a Rackham Faculty Allies Grant.

RLL Department-Wide Book Reading
Teaching the Whole Student: Engaged Learning With Heart, Mind, and Spirit

In Winter 2018, RLL hosted a department-wide reading of Teaching the Whole Student: Engaged Learning with Heart, Mind, and Spirit. The text is centered around themes related to students' social identities, civic engagement, diversity and social justice. Three discussion sessions were scheduled, each focused on a different part of the book. The RLL Diversity Committee provided the book free to department members participating in the initiative.

The Romance Creoles are Not Bastard Tongues; they are Legitimate Offspring of their Lexifiers!
Professor Salikoko Mufwene, University of Chicago

Focusing on French creoles, Professor Mufwene shows that the Romance creoles are new Romance vernaculars that diverge from their lexifiers in ways similar to the divergence of the latter from Vulgar Latin. In some ways, the creoles are less divergent from their nonstandard lexifiers than the traditional Romance languages are from theirs, prompting us to factor in the significance of layers of language contact (during their longer history) in shaping the structures of neo-Latin vernaculars in Europe. Their non-rectilinear and non-unilineal evolutions also remind us of the competition that obtained among the numerous neo-Latin vernaculars within their national borders and the particular role of academies in aspiring at linguistic unity and artificially influencing their evolution. 

Ghostly Labor in the Levantine Prism of Jacqueline Kahanoff
Professor Amr Kamal, The City College of New York (CUNY)

Living in colonial Egypt, Jacqueline Kahanoff had a unique experience shared by the members of her class and generation. Kahanoff was a Jewish Francophone and Anglophone writer from Egypt born to Tunisian grandparents who owned a famous department store. Taking the store as a model for citizenship, she suggests an alternative notion of Mediterranean culture and Egyptian identity, which sought to decentralize European hegemony, a notion which she later dubs “Levantinism.” Amr Kamal analyzes her 1951 novel, Jacob’s Ladder, to examine the process through which Levantine culture developed amid several competing imperial and nationalist projects. In particular, he shows how the novel’s depiction of Levantine spaces documents the marginalized role of the working class in the education of elite Levantine society and its acquisition of cultural capital. His analysis also explores how the construction and sustenance of a celebrated image of the Levantine past depended on the racialization of labor, or what he calls “ethnic classism.” Through this latter process, a labor force made up of other Levantines was Orientalized and relegated to the background where it served to highlight a European-like Levantine cosmopolitanism.