Skip to Content

Search: {{$root.lsaSearchQuery.q}}, Page {{$root.page}}

Hire a Ph.D.

  1. Placement Record

Presenting the 2018-2019 Job Market Candidates

The University of Michigan's graduate program in Political Science is tremendously proud to present our 2019-2020 job market candidates. Please contact the candidates, their advisors, or Mark Dincecco, Placement Director, for further information.  

Chinbo Chong: American Politics

Dissertation Title: 

"The impact of pan-ethnic appeals of Asian American and Latino political behavior"


Committee:

Ted Brader (co-chair); Vincent Hutchings (co-chair); Matt Barreto (UCLA); Jane Junn (USC); Silvia Pedraza (University of Michigan – Sociology)


Summary:

Chinbo specializes in American political behavior and public opinion, with particular interests in the politics of race, ethnicity, and immigration. Her dissertation project explores whether and to what extent pan-ethnic identity appeals (e.g., Latino/Hispanic, Asian American) mobilize Latinos and Asian Americans to take political action when a significant portion of them prefer their national origin identities (e.g., Chinese American; Mexican American). In response to this phenomenon, Chinbo builds a theoretical argument that connects these varying identity appeals to key markers of the immigrant socialization process, including: length of residence in the U.S., immigrant generational status and language proficiency. By leveraging a series of randomized survey experiments, Chinbo finds responsiveness to national origin appeals among Latinos and Asian Americans to largely depend on nativity status. Among Asian Americans, however, she finds U.S. born individuals to respond adversely to the pan-ethnic appeal on vote choice. These differential factors across Latinos and Asian Americans of pan-ethnic and national origin appeals speak to the unique paths to politicization of these two groups.

In 2018-2019, she will be at the University of Pennsylvania’s Center for the Study of Ethnicity, Race, and Immigration through the Vice Provost’s Diversity Pre-Doctoral Fellowship where she plans to build on her dissertation work.

In other on-going work, Chinbo is invested in intra- and inter-group political behavior. To highlight a few projects, Chinbo has investigated the tenuous partisan attachments in the Asian American community. Specifically, Chinbo and her collaborators find evidence for the abandonment of the Republican partisanship among Vietnamese Americans in Orange County, California. In her other collaborative work, Chinbo and her co-authors examine the racial disparities in mobilization by formal institutions like political parties and argue that contacts by community-based organizations might have important participatory outcomes for non-white voters. Using the 2008 Collaborative Multi-racial Post-Election Survey (CMPS) they find that while contact by political party or campaign has an overall positive effect on political participation for all voters, contact by one’s community-based group is substantively more important for Latino and Asian American voter mobilization.

Chinbo can teach courses focused on American politics; politics of race, ethnicity, and immigration; political behavior; public opinion; identity politics; and research design. For more information on her work please visit www.chinbochong.com.
 

Diogo Ferrari: Political Methodology, Comparative Politics

Dissertation Title:

"Essays on the Micro-foundation of Support for Welfare Policies"

Committee:

Robert Franzese (co-chair), Walter Mebane (co-chair), Kevin Quinn and Long Nguyen (statistics)

Summary:

Diogo Ferrari is a political methodologist and comparativist. His research lies on the intersection of political methodology, machine learning, computational social sciences, and political economy. He combines political economy and political sociology to investigates how socioeconomic conditions and inequality affect people's perception of their socioeconomic environment and their political behavior. His work is published at leading journals, including Political Analysis and Publius.

Nadiya Kostyuk: World Politics, Public Policy, Methodology

Dissertation Title:

"Causes and Consequences of Cyber Institutions"

Committee:

James Morrow (co-chair), Yuri Zhukov (co-chair), John Ciorciari, Tamar Mitts, Susan Landau

Summary: 

Nadiya Kostyuk is a doctoral candidate in Political Science and Public Policy at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Her research focuses on security studies, modern warfare, cyber conflict, cyber institutions and capability, Russian and Eurasian politics. Her methodological areas of interest include network analysis, mathematical and computational modeling, and text analysis. Her research has been supported by the Belfer Center for Science and International Technology at Harvard's Kennedy School, the Department of Computer Science and the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University, and the Cybersecurity, Internet Governance, Digital Economy, and Civic Tech Initiative at Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs. Her research has been published (or is forthcoming) in the Cyber Defense Review, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), Journal of Global Security Studies, Journal of Conflict Resolution, Journal of Peace Research, Journal of Strategic Security, and several edited volumes and general-audience publications.

Marzia Oceno: American Politics, Methodology

Dissertation Title:

"Explaining Heterogeneity in Women’s Support for Female Candidates"

Committee:

Nick Valentino (chair), Nancy Burns, Elizabeth R. Cole (Psychology), Donald R. Kinder, and Arthur Lupia

Summary:
 

Albana Shehaj: Comparative Politics, Methodology

Dissertation Title:

"Essays on the Political Economy of Distributive Politics"

Committee:

Allen Hicken (Co-Chair), Brian Min (Co-Chair), Anna Grzymala-Busse (Stanford University), Scott Page

Summary:

For information on my research and teaching interests, please visit my website at: https://sites.lsa.umich.edu/albanashehaj.

Logan Woods: American Politics, Methodology

Dissertation Title:

 

Committee:

Walter Mebane, Jr. (chair), Nick Valentino, Jowei Chen, Stuart Soroka

Summary:

 

Nicole Yadon: American Politics

Dissertation Title:

"The Politics of Skin Color"

Committee:

Vince Hutchings (co-chair), Ted Brader (co-chair), Don Kinder, Mara Ostfeld, Al Young (Sociology)

Summary:

For information on my research and teaching interests, please visit my website: www.nicoleyadon.com

Kirill Zhirkov: American Politics, Methodology, Comparative Politics

Dissertation Title:

"Implicit and Explicit Schemas about Immigrants and Attitudes toward Immigration"

Committee:

Nicholas Valentino (co-chair), Ted Brader, Walter Mebane, Stuart Soroka

Summary:

I specialize in the fields of political psychology and public opinion with a particular focus on the fundamental aspects of human cognition in politics. My dissertation investigates one of the key issues in contemporary politics of the United States and other developed democracies: public attitudes toward immigration. Theoretical framework of the dissertation project builds upon recent work regarding the role of imagination in how ordinary citizens make sense of the political world as well as on the schematic model of human cognition. Using these theoretical insights, I argue that individual differences in perceptions (or schemas) about “who the immigrants are” can improve our understanding of anti-immigration attitudes as well as their implications for policy preferences and partisan loyalties among natives. To test this argument, I carry out a series of original survey studies both in the U.S. and internationally. Using several original measurement techniques, I find strong support for the schematic model with regard to anti-immigrant attitudes. Specifically, I demonstrate that natives tend to think of immigrants in terms of more concrete social and demographic attributes and that these schematic associations about immigrants predict anti-immigrant prejudice, attitudes toward immigration, and partisan affect. One of the dissertation chapters specifically demonstrates the importance of racialized schemas about immigrants for anti-immigration attitudes in the U.S. and in Britain. Before coming to the University of Michigan, I worked as junior fellow at the Laboratory for Comparative Social Research in St Petersburg, Russia. I also worked as a visiting scholar or carried out survey studies in Germany, Netherlands, Sweden, and the UK. I am also interested in applied statistical methods and pursue a dual MA degree at the Department of Statistics in addition to PhD in political science. Apart from my dissertation, I have a number of individual and collaborative research projects in the fields of political psychology, public opinion, political behavior, and political methodology both in the U.S. and comparatively. Two of my papers have been published in Party Politics and Conflict Management and Peace Science respectively. Nine other papers are currently at different stages of the review process. Examples of the topics I explore in my research include political polarization in the United States, electoral appeal of the right-wing populist parties in Western Europe, and the impact of personality on political attitudes and behaviors. The paper “The Images in Our Heads: Race, Partisanship, and Affective Polarization” I wrote with Nicholas A. Valentino won the 2018 Best Paper in Political Behavior award by the Midwest Political Science Association.