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Intersectional Challenges in Mobilizing Activists on the basis of Race and Gender during the Presidency of Donald J. Trump

 

Theme: Microaggressions: Conceptual, Research, and Practice/Intervention Implications; Freedom of Expression and Race: Considerations, Tensions, and Contradictions
Project Title: Intersectional Challenges in Mobilizing Activists on the basis of Race and Gender during the Presidency of Donald J. Trump
GranteeMichael Heaney, Assistant Professor of Organizational Studies and Political Science at the University of Michigan 
Grant Period: January-June 2018

Abstract
Social movements for racial justice and gender equity have long faced challenges in mobilizing marginalized subgroups among their constituencies. For example, movements for racial justice have struggled to mobilize women on an equal basis with men, while women's movements have struggled to mobilize people of color on an equal basis with whites. The election of Donald J. Trump as President of the United States has prompted new efforts to mobilize people on the basis of race and gender in the United States, which has created opportunities to observe movements work on intersectional issues in real time. This study is based on surveys conducted at marches for racial justice and gender equity in Washington, DC, and other cities, since the election of Trump. The surveys include questions on reasons for marching, political attitudes, history of participation in social movements, organizational membership and participation, and socio-economic factors. Preliminary results show that while movements have recently made strides in giving greater attention to resolving intersectional challenges, differences within movements still remain. In particular, young people, organizational members, more ideological liberal individuals give more attention to intersectionality than do older people, those who are not members of organizations, and those who are more ideologically moderate.