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Forms and Policies

Master's Degree Forms & Policies

International Travel Policy

International travel is increasingly important to our work. Our students are taking to heart our encouragement to study abroad. The University has developed this policy and the resources that support it in order to make the international travel experience more enjoyable and secure for the entire University community. The International Travel Policy/SPG #601.31 pertains to all faculty, staff, and students engaged in University-related international travel. It addresses the health, safety, and security of U-M travelers. This policy addresses the U-M Travel Registry; travel abroad health insurance; emergency evacuation insurance; U-M travel warnings or University travel restrictions; and international travel involving student groups.

University Travel Registry: All faculty, staff, and students traveling abroad must register their international travel in the Registry before departure. This confidential and secure database provides a convenient tool for the traveler and the department to coordinate travel details. It will also help the University locate you if an emergency situation arises.

Travel Abroad Health Insurance: All students traveling abroad are required to have travel abroad insurance coverage from the University's authorized vendor. Faculty and staff traveling internationally are covered under the University's blanket policy with that vendor.

Emergency Evacuation Insurance: All faculty, staff, and students traveling internationally are covered under a blanket policy for emergency evacuation due to political unrest or natural disaster.

University Travel Warnings or Travel Restrictions: This segment delineates policies pertaining to travel to destinations for which the University has issued a Travel Warning, and travel to destinations for which the University has issued a Travel Restriction.

International Travel Involving Student Groups: Includes specific requirements for University-sponsored travel abroad and student-initiated group travel abroad.

Comprehensive information is available on this Global Michigan website.

Rackham Graduate School Academic Policies

All Department of Mathematics graduate students are subject to our Rackham Graduate School's Academic Policies and Regulations.

The graduate programs of the Rackham Graduate School are located in the schools, colleges, and departments of the University of Michigan. The academic policies and regulations in this document have been established by the Rackham Executive Board to ensure consistent standards in admissions, registration, degree requirements, and the awarding of degrees across all Rackham graduate programs. Individual graduate programs have additional requirements and rules. Students are expected to be familiar with both the policies of the Graduate School and those of their programs.

The Graduate School maintains an academic, scholarly, and professional code of conduct to safeguard standards of learning, research, and professional integrity. Students are expected to understand and observe these standards. In conjunction with the schools and colleges, the Graduate School has procedures for investigating allegations of misconduct and imposing sanctions.

Doctoral Degree Forms & Policies

Academic Probation & Dismissal Policy

Policy for satisfactory academic progress, unsatisfactory academic standing, academic probation and dismissal from the Mathematics and AIM Ph.D. programs

Approved by the Mathematics Department Executive Committee: October 17, 2018

Ph.D. Program Requirements for the Mathematics Ph.D. and AIM Ph.D. programs, and required timelines for achieving them, are available on the math department webpage and in printed form from the graduate office. Requirements are discussed with each student by staff and faculty at advising appointments, informational meetings, and through written communication.

The policy for academic progress, unsatisfactory academic standing, academic probation, and dismissal from the Mathematics and AIM Ph.D. programs will be communicated in writing to each student upon arrival for orientation at the University before beginning their first semester. It is also posted on the department website.

Satisfactory progress.

To remain in good standing and achieve satisfactory progress, pre-candidate students meet with the chair of the doctoral committee or AIM director after each attempt at any Qualifying Review exam to discuss their academic performance, and each semester after that to discuss their progress towards selecting a PhD advisor. Then, the student will meet regularly with their advisor to discuss their progress toward the degree. In addition, all student progress is reviewed annually by the doctoral committee (Math) or AIM committee (AIM). Students are informed in writing each May whether their progress is deemed satisfactory or unsatisfactory after that review.

Unsatisfactory academic standing, academic probation and dismissal.

Students are notified in writing immediately when they have failed to achieve any of the required milestones described in the Mathematics Graduate Brochure (or online) or when their progress is otherwise deemed insufficient by the doctoral committee, AIM committee or other relevant faculty. This assessment is based on written evaluations of student work provided by instructors/advisors after each semester, and any other evidence gathered, including conversations with relevant faculty. The written notification of unsatisfactory progress will include an invitation for the student to discuss their progress and strategies for success with the Doctoral Committee chair or AIM director.

In the following cases, the student may be placed on academic probation:

1. Failure to make progress or pass the Qualifying Review by the prescribed deadlines described in the Program Requirements.
2. Failure to achieve candidacy by the end of the third year.
3. Failure to continue making progress toward the degree with a designated thesis advisor once candidacy has been achieved.

The decision to place a pre-candidate on probation will be made by the doctoral committee or AIM committee; for candidates, the decision will be made by a faculty group of at least three faculty, normally including Associate Chair for Graduate Studies, the Doctoral Committee chair or AIM Director, and the student’s advisor (if any). The probationary period will normally conclude at the end of the semester it is imposed, but in no case will it be shorter than two months. The Associate Chair for Graduate Studies will notify the student and Rackham Office of Academic Records and Dissertations (OARD) in writing before the probationary period begins, explaining the reasons and conditions of probation, the start and end dates of the probationary period, and options for appeal. The financial commitment to the individual student will not be altered by the probation.

A student who has been placed on probation may request a leave of absence or withdraw from the program. The leave or withdrawal will stop the clock on the probationary period, which resumes when the student returns to active status or is reinstated. Probation will remain in effect until the conditions are remedied or the student is dismissed.

At the end of probation, and upon the recommendation of the Associate Chair for Graduate Studies and the consent of the Graduate School, a student may either be returned to good academic standing, be dismissed from the program or have the probation extended. The decision to dismiss a student will be made by a faculty group of at least three faculty, normally the doctoral committee or AIM committee in consultation with the Associate Chair for Graduate Studies. The student and Rackham OARD will be informed of the recommendation of dismissal, and of the policy for appealing the decision.

Appealing academic probation or dismissal.

If a student chooses to appeal the decision to be placed on academic probation or to be dismissed, the department will convene a separate committee to review their case. Students may use the Graduate School’s Academic Dispute Resolution process only for procedural issues of fair and equal treatment under the policy of the program, and not to appeal the academic reasons for the decision.

Students who fail to meet standards of academic or professional integrity or who have been found responsible for violations of other University standards of conduct may be dismissed in accordance with separate procedures described in Rackham Academic and Professional Policy (Section 8).

GSI Absence/Travel Policy

The Michigan Math Department supports our graduate students’ research and teaching careers. It is important for graduate students to be able to advance their research careers by going to conferences and workshops. At the same time, graduate students are often employed as GSIs, with responsibilities toward their own students, the colleagues with whom they are teaching, and our educational mission more broadly. Having instructors teaching their own classes for as many days as possible during the semester is important for building a relationship of trust and providing students with personalized support. The department has a responsibility to support the undergraduates who are taught by our GSIs, and to support the Introductory Program (105/115/116) as a whole. This policy is an attempt to create a balanced system that takes all of these things into account.

GSIs teaching 105/115/116

Precandidates: Allowed 1 missed class per semester, for any reason (including a conference), as long as:
● the absence does not occur during the period starting on the Friday before an exam through the completion of exam grading for the course,
● the student submits the proper webform notification at least 24 hours in advance, and
● the instructor has found a suitable substitute.
The GSI and the substitute must mutually work out compensation. No approval is needed for this absence.

Candidates: Allowed 1 missed class per semester, for any reason (including a conference), and 1 additional missed class for a conference or workshop, as long as:
● the absences do not occur during the period starting on the Friday before an exam through the completion of exam grading for the course,
● the student submits the proper webform notification at least 24 hours in advance, and
● the instructor has found a suitable substitute.
The GSI and the substitute must mutually work out compensation. No approval is needed for these absences, and they can be consecutive to allow the GSI to attend a longer conference.


GSIs teaching 215/216

Allowed 1 missed class day (four labs) per semester, for any reason (including a conference), as long as:
● the absence does not occur during the period starting on the Friday before an exam through the completion of exam grading for the course,
● the student submits the proper webform notification at least 24 hours in advance, and
● the instructor has found a suitable substitute.
The GSI and the substitute must mutually work out compensation. The GSI is responsible for keeping up with all grading responsibilities during their absence. No approval is needed for this absence.

GSIs teaching Other Courses in the Math Department should make arrangements with their direct supervisor. GSI positions outside math are not included in this policy.

Additional/Extended Absences

When a GSI would like to attend a conference or other event that does not fall under the above guidelines, they can request permission by submitting appropriate webform as soon as possible but at least four weeks before the requested absence. With their request, they should include the name of a faculty member who supports the travel, as well as the plans they have made to make sure their students get the attention they need during the absence The request will be reviewed by the course coordinator, in consultation with the Associate Chair for Education and the Associate Chair for Education, as needed, and the student will be informed as soon as possible, but within one week, whether or not permission to miss work for the conference will be granted.
Absences due to emergency or illness are not subject to this policy. For emergency leave including sick leave, bereavement leave and immigration proceedings leave, see the GEO contract.

Substitutes

Any instructor who has taught the course previously or is currently teaching the course is considered a suitable substitute with the following exception: Math 115 classes covering sections 2.4, 4.1, 4.2 need to be covered by an instructor who has previously taught Math 115. If a GSI needs help finding a substitute, they can contact the course coordinator of their course for assistance.

Informing the Department of an Absence / Requesting an Extended Absence

All GSIs who will be missing their teaching responsibilities under the conditions of this policy must inform the department by filling out the webform located here (need link). Failure to do so may result in future exclusion from the allowances in the policy.

Office Hours

During their absence, GSIs are expected to arrange for their office hours, including their Math Lab hour, to be held by a substitute, or to reschedule these hours to a date shortly before or after their absence.

Advanced Notice

The department works hard to try to optimize the configuration of GSIs working in the department in any given semester. As a part of this process, it is important that GSIs inform the Introductory Program Directors before teaching assignments are made if there are conferences they are seriously considering attending. In some cases, this will allow the GSI to be given an assignment that minimizes the effect of their absence on the undergraduates taking our classes, and the effect on the Introductory Program as a whole. Requests that are made in advance are easier to accommodate, so may be more likely to be approved.  

GSI Office Assignment Policy

All first year Ph.D. students are assigned one of three open offices located in the basement of East Hall. Each of these offices is equipped with a desk for each student and at least 2 desk top computers to share among the occupants. Master’s degree students in the department are assigned an office/desk as there is available space.

For students in their 2nd through 5th year: most graduate student offices house up to 3 to 4 students. The process for assigning offices is as follows: each April, the Graduate Coordinator sends an email to the math-grads@umich.edu requesting office preference information from each student. Each student provides a preference of officemates and preferred location. This information is compiled. Every effort is made to match students with preferred office mates. Smaller offices have a desk for each student and either a book shelf or filing cabinet.

A list of new office assignments is distributed to all the students. Individual students may decide whether or not to move to a new office or remain where they are located.

Every effort is made to allow students who are beyond the 5th year to remain in their current office. If this is not possible, another office space will be provided where room is available.

Specific room assignments are offered to students who have special needs. Should someone have a chalk allergy for example, we have offices that have white boards instead. Should someone have a physical handicap that would not allow them to walk up stairs (5080 East Hall is the only office that has stairs at the entrance), we have several offices that are accommodating for them and will assign them as such.

For students with special needs that may not be able to walk up stairs into their GSI’s office (this would only effect 5080 East Hall – all other offices are wheel chair accessible), to attend office hours of a GSI , we expect GSIs to make available time for all of their students in a space that is user friendly to all. It should also be noted that each GSI is required to spend at least 1 office hour a week in the Mathlab which is wheel chair accessible.
 

International Travel Policy

International travel is increasingly important to our work. Our students are taking to heart our encouragement to study abroad. The University has developed this policy and the resources that support it in order to make the international travel experience more enjoyable and secure for the entire University community. The International Travel Policy/SPG #601.31 pertains to all faculty, staff, and students engaged in University-related international travel. It addresses the health, safety, and security of U-M travelers. This policy addresses the U-M Travel Registry; travel abroad health insurance; emergency evacuation insurance; U-M travel warnings or University travel restrictions; and international travel involving student groups.

University Travel Registry: All faculty, staff, and students traveling abroad must register their international travel in the Registry before departure. This confidential and secure database provides a convenient tool for the traveler and the department to coordinate travel details. It will also help the University locate you if an emergency situation arises.

Travel Abroad Health Insurance: All students traveling abroad are required to have travel abroad insurance coverage from the University's authorized vendor. Faculty and staff traveling internationally are covered under the University's blanket policy with that vendor.

Emergency Evacuation Insurance: All faculty, staff, and students traveling internationally are covered under a blanket policy for emergency evacuation due to political unrest or natural disaster.

University Travel Warnings or Travel Restrictions: This segment delineates policies pertaining to travel to destinations for which the University has issued a Travel Warning, and travel to destinations for which the University has issued a Travel Restriction.

International Travel Involving Student Groups: Includes specific requirements for University-sponsored travel abroad and student-initiated group travel abroad.

Comprehensive information is available on this Global Michigan website.

QR Deadlines Addendum Winter 2020 (COVID-19)

Adopted 3/17/2020 

Due to the necessity of remote teaching and learning caused by the COVID 19 pandemic, University of Michigan AIM and Math PhD students will be given one extra term to meet QR deadlines. This accommodation will be given to PhD students entering their program in Winter 2020, Fall 2019, and Fall 2018.

Regular Math PhD Deadlines: Students must pass at least one QR exam by the start of their fourth term. For example, a student entering the doctoral program in the Fall of 2019 must pass the QR examination in at least one area by early January 2021. The Qualifying Review must be completed by the start of the 6th term. For example, the same student entering the doctoral program in the Fall of 2019 must pass the QR examination in at least one area by early January 2021, and complete the remaining requirements for the Qualifying Review by early January 2022.

Math PhD Special Deadlines: Students must pass at least one QR exam at the end of their fourth term. For example, a student entering the doctoral program in the Fall of 2019 must pass the QR examination in at least one area by May 2021. The Qualifying Review must be completed at the end of their 6th term. For example, the same student entering the doctoral program in the Fall of 2019 must pass the QR examination in at least one area by May 2021, and complete the remaining requirements for the Qualifying Review by May 2022.

Regular AIM PhD Deadlines: Incoming students must sign up to take two exams prior to beginning their coursework. Students not passing the exams on the first attempt will receive counseling regarding options (for example, remedial coursework) for enabling future success. The AIM Qualifying Review Examinations are offered twice each school year, once prior to the start of classes in the Fall semester and again prior to the start of classes in the Winter semester. Successful AIM Ph.D. students will pass two exams within three attempts, that is, by the beginning of the second year of study. Unsuccessful students may continue in the program for one further year to complete an AIM Master's degree.

Special AIM PhD Deadlines: Incoming students must sign up to take two exams prior to beginning their coursework. Students not passing the exams on the first attempt will receive counseling regarding options (for example, remedial coursework) for enabling future success. The AIM Qualifying Review Examinations are offered twice each school year, once prior to the start of classes in the Fall semester and again prior to the start of classes in the Winter semester. Successful AIM Ph.D. students will pass two exams within four attempts, that is, by the beginning of the fourth semester of study. Unsuccessful students may continue in the program for one further year to complete an AIM Master's degree.
 

Rackham Graduate School Academic Policies

All Department of Mathematics graduate students are subject to our Rackham Graduate School's Academic Policies and Regulations.

The graduate programs of the Rackham Graduate School are located in the schools, colleges, and departments of the University of Michigan. The academic policies and regulations in this document have been established by the Rackham Executive Board to ensure consistent standards in admissions, registration, degree requirements, and the awarding of degrees across all Rackham graduate programs. Individual graduate programs have additional requirements and rules. Students are expected to be familiar with both the policies of the Graduate School and those of their programs.

The Graduate School maintains an academic, scholarly, and professional code of conduct to safeguard standards of learning, research, and professional integrity. Students are expected to understand and observe these standards. In conjunction with the schools and colleges, the Graduate School has procedures for investigating allegations of misconduct and imposing sanctions.

Some Ph.D. Specific Policies are listed below.

Rackham's Continuous Enrollment Policy

Once admitted to a PhD program, students will register every fall and winter term until their degree is awarded, unless they are taking an official leave of absence. Students must be registered for 8 credits of Math 995 during the term of the dissertation defense.

Leave of Absence

Events may occur that make it necessary for a student pursuing a PhD to interrupt his or her progress toward a degree. Since students in PhD programs are required to be continuously enrolled, they may ask for a temporary leave of absence when certain life events make impossible continued active participation in the degree program. A leave of absence enables a student to not register during a fall or winter term and remain in compliance with the continuous enrollment requirement. A leave will be granted to students for illness or injury, to provide care or assistance for family and dependents, to meet military service obligations, or for other personal reasons. The official Leave of Absence Policy is maintained by the Rackham Graduate School. Additional information can be found on the Leave of Absence webpage.

Reinstatement Fee

A Ph.D. student who discontinues enrollment in Spring/Summer 2012 or later and subsequently is reinstated into the same program will be assessed a fee equal to one quarter of the prevailing candidacy tuition rate for each fall and winter semester that the student was not registered, up to a maximum of eight semesters. Students who discontinued their enrollment at any time prior to Spring/Summer 2012 are not subject to this fee. Responsibility for paying the reinstatement fee will be split between the graduate student seeking to re-enroll and the graduate program that agrees to reinstate the student, such that the graduate program will pay at least half of the fee. For additional information, please visit Rackham's Reinstatement to a Ph.D. webpage.

 

Extramural Study
A student who enrolls at another institution to pursue study relevant to the PhD in a period that overlaps substantially with a University fall or winter term may be eligible for extramural study status (extramural study is not an appropriate status for a student who is engaged in fieldwork or archival research, or who has an internship but is not enrolled in a formal course of study at another institution). The official Extramural Study Policy is maintained by the Rackham Graduate School. Additional information can be found on the Extramural Study webpage.

Travel Fund Policy

The Mathematics Department Travel Fund is intended to make professional trips possible for Mathematics Ph.D. graduate students without other sources of funding. Students are required to request funding from the Rackham Graduate School and from their faculty advisor before requesting funds from the Department.

Requests to make use of this fund should be made to the Associate Chair for Graduate Students via an online form on the Intranet. One trip per student during their academic training will normally be approved by the Associate Chair or Chair, subject to availability of funding. A student must have achieved candidacy and should not be beyond the fifth year of training.


Travel that will typically be supported includes conferences and meetings that support the career of the student as a mathematician or educator, e.g., where the student is making a presentation or participating in a panel or administrative meeting. The purpose of the trip should be documented at the time of application for funding, e.g., by a copy of a letter of invitation.


Reimbursements are limited to a maximum of $750 for trips in the continental United States and Canada and $1,000 for international trips or trips to Hawaii and Alaska. Expenses incurred for transportation, lodging, registration, and miscellaneous expenses permitted under University guidelines may be requested, but not expenses for meals.


Cases where there is an issue of eligibility or of sufficiency of funding should be brought to the Executive Committee.


Approved and adopted in final form by the Executive Committee, February 13, 2020.