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Intergroup Relations Education Minor

Effective Fall 2020

Advising

IGR has a tiered advising system where students initially meet with peer advisors who provide guidance and advising. If questions persist or cannot be answered by the peer advising team, the program directors will meet with students as needed.

The IGR program assistant will help with administrative tasks such as formally declaring students and verifying when students complete the minor.

Prerequisites

None.

Requirements

Minimum Credits: 19
  1. Foundation Core Courses. Elect both:
      1. ALA 122/ PSYCH 122/ SOC 122: Intergroup Dialogues
      2. ALA 220 / SOC 218 / PSYCH 213: Foundations of Intergroup Relations
        or
        PSYCH 218: Sophomore Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science, section titled “Foundations of Intergroup Relations”

    The two courses provide the foundational theory and pedagogy of the minor. Intergroup dialogues give students the beginning tools to work across difference. They learn introductory social science concepts about inequality and experience conflict by working across difference. The Foundations of Intergroup Relations course gives students a solid overview of historical and contemporary structures of inequality, and examines the theory behind how social identity groups form, and how bias develops (prejudice, stereotyping, and discrimination). These two courses also explore how people develop an understanding of their own social identity group membership, how groups are impacted by privilege and power dynamics, and how to develop advocacy for groups to which one does not belong.

  2. Praxis Core Courses emphasize praxis, the engagement of theory with practice and reflection. Choose one of the following tracks:
    1. The Facilitative Leadership Track (7 credits) prepares students to lead others in addressing the demographic and democratic challenges posed by inequality. The practice focus occurs in the classroom, where students lead others in intergroup dialogue.
      • ALA 320 / SOC 320 / PSYCH 310: Processes of Intergroup Dialogues Facilitation
      • ALA 321 / SOC 321 / PSYCH 311: Practicum in Facilitating Intergroup Dialogues
      • ALA 270 ALA Topics: Section titled, "Intergroup Dialogue Facilitation"
    2. The Campus Communities and Research Track (8 credits) allows students to explore praxis in broader community and research contexts and prepares them to understand inequality and develop coalitions for social justice work.
      • Statistics. STATS 250 or SOC 210 or STATS 280.
        Students may request to substitute another research methods class other than STATS 250 or SOC 210.
      • Campus Community Course (ALA 421 or ALA 324) prepares students to recognize when social identities play a role in inequalities both on and off campus, to intervene in constructive ways when this happens, and to learn to act as peer educators in community settings, including residence halls and other campus-based settings.
      • IGR Research Practicum (ALA 329) allows students to practice intergroup skills in a more traditional academic setting: the research laboratory, as they are deepening their intergroup learning through the research process.
  3. Elective Course: ALA 228 Conflict and Coexistence; ALA 248: Understanding Conflict through Int’l Dialogue; ALA 322 Advanced Practicum;  ALA 324 Facilitation for Effective Leadership; ALA 471 Leading Community Building; ALA 421 Creating Inclusive Communities or other cognate.                  Students take at least one 3- or 4-credit course in another academic unit that complements the goals of the minor. Students may also propose additional courses for consideration. The criteria used for selection include: The course must address social identities and intergroup relations in some way, and the course should discuss issues of inequality, power, privilege, and oppression or should focus on leadership and social change. (See below list of approved electives from other departments.)
  4. IGR Senior Capstone: ALA 429 / SOC 471 / PSYCH 411: IGR Senior Capstone: Social Justice in the Real World – an interdisciplinary experience to connect their learning throughout the minor. Students consider the broad national and global challenges facing their generation and examine them using real-world settings.

Intergroup Relations Education Approved Electives From Other Departments

  • AAS 202: Introduction to Afro-Caribbean Studies
  • AAS 248: Crime, Race, and the Law
  • AAS 262 / HISTORY 272: Modern Civil Rights Movement
  • AAS / WGS 328 (WOMENSTD 328): Women, Agency & Sexual Safety (F17)
  • AAS / WGS 381 (WOMENSTD 381) / ENGLISH 380: Fictions and Feminisms (F17)
  • AAS / WGS 443 (WOMENSTD 443): Pedagogy of Empowerment (F17)
  • AAS 451: Law, Race, and the Historical Process, II
  • ALA 228 / SOC 375 / PSYCH 312: Intergroup Conflict & Coexistence: Religion, Ethnicity, & Culture
  • AMCULT / ARABAM 215 / MIDEAST 275: Introduction to Arab-American Studies
  • AMCULT / NATIVAM 217: Introduction to Native American Studies
  • AMCULT / WGS 240 (WOMENSTD 240): Introduction to Women’s and Gender Studies
  • AMCULT / FTVM / COMM / DIGITAL 334: Race and Video Games (F17)
  • AMCULT / ASIANPAM 353 / HISTORY 454: Asians in American Film and Television
  • AMCULT / WGS 411 (WOMENSTD 411): Rednecks, Queers, and Country Music
  • ANTHRCUL 302 / WOMENSTD 302 / HISTART 302: Sex and Gender in Japan
  • ANTHRCUL / LING 370: Language and Discrimination (F17)
  • ARABAM / AMCULT 215 / MIDEAST 275: Introduction to Arab-American Studies
  • ASIAN 334: Prejudice: India & US (F17)
  • ASIAN 352: Gender, Sexuality, and Power in Premodern China (F17)
  • ASIANPAM / AMCULT 353 / HISTORY 454: Asians in American Film and Television
  • COMM / FTVM / AMCULT / DIGITAL 334: Race and Video Games (F17)
  • COMM 428: Gender, Media, and the Law
  • DIGITAL / COMM / FTVM / AMCULT 334: Race and Video Games (F17)
  • EDUC 463: Web-Based Mentorship: Arab-Israel Conflict Simulation
  • ENGLISH / WGS 315 (WOMENSTD 315): Women & Literature (F17)
  • ENGLISH 316: Disability Studies (F17)
  • ENGLISH 380 / AAS / WGS 381 (WOMENSTD 381): Fictions and Feminisms (F17)
  • ENVIRON / ORGSTUDY 203: Activism
  • FTVM / AMCULT / COMM / DIGITAL 334: Race and Video Games (F17)
  • HISTART / ANTHRCUL / WGS 302 (WOMENSTD 302): Sex and Gender in Japan
  • HISTORY 272 / AAS 262: Modern Civil Rights Movement
  • HISTORY / LACS 349: Revolutionary Movements in Modern Latin America
  • HISTORY 454 / AMCULT / ASIANPAM 353: Asians in American Film and Television
  • INTLSTD 401: International Studies Advanced Seminar, section titled “Women and Islam: The Politics of Representation”
  • LACS / HISTORY 349: Revolutionary Movements in Modern Latin America
  • LING / ANTHRCUL 370: Language and Discrimination (F17)
  • MIDEAST 275 / AMCULT / ARABAM 215: Introduction to Arab-American Studies
  • ORGSTUDY / ENVIRON 203: Activism
  • PSYCH 280: Introduction to Social Psychology
  • PSYCH / WGS 291 (WOMENSTD 291): Introduction to the Psychology of Women and Gender
  • PSYCH 312 / ALA 228 / SOC 375: Intergroup Conflict & Coexistence: Religion, Ethnicity, & Culture
  • PSYCH 353: Social Development
  • RCSSCI 360: Social Science Junior Seminar, section titled “Transgender Politics and Community Action”
  • SM 421 / WOMENSTD 421: Gender and Sport
  • SOC 345 / WGS 348 (WOMENSTD 348): Sociology of Sexuality
  • SOC 346: Sociology of the Body
  • SOC 354: Law & Society (F17)
  • SOC 368: Criminology
  • SOC 375 / ALA 228 / PSYCH 312: Intergroup Conflict & Coexistence: Religion, Ethnicity, & Culture
  • SOC / WOMENSTD 447: Sociology of Gender
  • SOC 458: Sociology of Education
  • WGS (WOMENSTD) / AMCULT 240: Introduction to Women’s and Gender Studies
  • WGS 245 (WOMENSTD 245): Introduction to LGBT and Queer Studies
  • WGS (WOMENSTD) / PSYCH 291: Introduction to the Psychology of Women and Gender
  • WGS (WOMENSTD) / ANTHRCUL / HISTART 302: Sex and Gender in Japan
  • WGS (WOMENSTD) / ENGLISH 315: Women and Literature (F17)
  • WGS (WOMENSTD) / AAS 328: Women, Agency & Sexual Safety (F17)
  • WGS 330 (WOMENSTD 330): Feminist Thought
  • WGS 331 (WOMENSTD 331): Feminist Theoretical Perspectives in Gender & Health (F17)
  • WGS 348 (WOMENSTD 348) / SOC 345: Sociology of Sexuality
  • WGS (WOMENSTD) / AAS 381 / ENGLISH 380: Fictions and Feminisms (F17)
  • WGS (WOMENSTD) / AMCULT 411: Rednecks, Queers, and Country Music
  • WGS (WOMENSTD) / SM 421: Gender and Sport
  • WGS (WOMENSTD) / AAS 443: Pedagogy of Empowerment (F17)
  • WOMENSTD / SOC 447: Sociology of Gender

Intergroup Relations Education (Minor) (Fall 2015 - Summer 2020)

Effective Fall 2015

Advising

IGR has a tiered advising system where students initially meet with peer advisors who provide guidance and advising. If questions persist or cannot be answered by the peer advising team, the program directors will meet with students as needed.

The IGR program assistant will help with administrative tasks such as formally declaring students and verifying when students complete the minor.

Prerequisites

None.

Requirements

Minimum Credits: 19
  1. Foundation Core Courses. Elect both:
      1. ALA 122/ PSYCH 122/ SOC 122: Intergroup Dialogues
      2. ALA 220 / SOC 218: Foundations of Intergroup Relations
        or
        PSYCH 218: Sophomore Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science, section titled “Foundations of Intergroup Relations”

    The two courses provide the foundational theory and pedagogy of the minor. Intergroup dialogues give students the beginning tools to work across difference. They learn introductory social science concepts about inequality and experience conflict by working across difference. The Foundations of Intergroup Relations course gives students a solid overview of historical and contemporary structures of inequality, and examines the theory behind how social identity groups form, and how bias develops (prejudice, stereotyping, and discrimination). These two courses also explore how people develop an understanding of their own social identity group membership, how groups are impacted by privilege and power dynamics, and how to develop advocacy for groups to which one does not belong.

  2. Praxis Core Courses emphasize praxis, the engagement of theory with practice and reflection. Choose one of the following tracks:
    1. The Facilitative Leadership Track (7 credits) prepares students to lead others in addressing the demographic and democratic challenges posed by inequality. The practice focus occurs in the classroom, where students lead others in intergroup dialogue.
      • ALA 320 / SOC 320 / PSYCH 310: Processes of Intergroup Dialogues Facilitation
      • ALA 321 / SOC 321 / PSYCH 311: Practicum in Facilitating Intergroup Dialogues
    2. The Campus Communities and Research Track (8 credits) allows students to explore praxis in broader community and research contexts and prepares them to understand inequality and develop coalitions for social justice work.
      • Statistics. STATS 250 or SOC 210.
        Students may request to substitute another research methods class other than STATS 250 or SOC 210.
      • Social Psychology in Community Settings (ALA 421) prepares students to recognize when social identities play a role in inequalities both on and off campus, to intervene in constructive ways when this happens, and to learn to act as peer educators in community settings, including residence halls and other campus-based settings.
      • IGR Research Practicum (ALA 323, PSYCH 326, or SOC 394 [taken for at least 2 credits]) allows students to practice intergroup skills in a more traditional academic setting: the research laboratory, as they are deepening their intergroup learning through the research process.
  3. Elective Course: Students take at least one 3- or 4-credit course in another academic unit that complements the goals of the minor. Students may also propose additional courses for consideration. The criteria used for selection include: The course must address social identities and intergroup relations in some way, and the course should discuss issues of inequality, power, privilege, and oppression or should focus on leadership and social change. (See below.)
  4. IGR Senior Capstone: ALA 429 / SOC 471 / PSYCH 411: IGR Senior Capstone: Social Justice in the Real World – an interdisciplinary experience to connect their learning throughout the minor. Students consider the broad national and global challenges facing their generation and examine them using real-world settings.

Intergroup Relations Education Approved Electives

  • AAS 202: Introduction to Afro-Caribbean Studies
  • AAS 248: Crime, Race, and the Law
  • AAS 262 / HISTORY 272: Modern Civil Rights Movement
  • AAS / WOMENSTD 328: Women, Agency & Sexual Safety (F17)
  • AAS / COMM / WOMENSTD 334: Race and Video Games (F17)
  • AAS / WOMENSTD 443: Pedagogy of Empowerment (F17)
  • AAS 451: Law, Race, and the Historical Process, II
  • AAS / WOMENSTD 381 / ENGLISH 380: Fictions and Feminisms (F17)
  • ALA 228 / SOC 375 / PSYCH 312: Intergroup Conflict & Coexistence: Religion, Ethnicity, & Culture
  • AMCULT 215 / ARABAM 215 / NEAREAST 275: Introduction to Arab-American Studies
  • AMCULT 217 / NATIVAM 217: Introduction to Native American Studies
  • AMCULT 240 / WOMENSTD 240: Introduction to Women’s Studies
  • AMCULT 353 / ASIANPAM 353 / HISTORY 454: Asians in American Film and Television
  • AMCULT 411 / WOMENSTD 411: Rednecks, Queers, and Country Music
  • ANTHRCUL 302 / WOMENSTD 302 / HISTART 302: Sex and Gender in Japan
  • ANTHRCUL / LING 370: Language and Discrimination (F17)
  • ARABAM 215 / AMCULT 215 / MIDEAST 275: Introduction to Arab-American Studies
  • ASIAN 334: Prejudice: India & US (F17)
  • ASIAN 352: Gender, Sexuality, and Power in Premodern China (F17)
  • ASIANPAM 353 / AMCULT 353 / HISTORY 454: Asians in American Film and Television
  • COMM / AAS / WOMENSTD 334: Race and Video Games (F17)
  • COMM 428: Gender, Media, and the Law
  • EDUC 463: Web-Based Mentorship: Arab-Israel Conflict Simulation
  • ENGLISH / WOMENSTD 315: Women & Literature (F17)
  • ENGLISH 316: Disability Studies (F17)
  • ENGLISH 380 / AAS / WOMENSTD 381: Fictions and Feminisms (F17)
  • ENVIRON 203 / ORGSTUDY 203: Activism
  • HISTART 302 / ANTHRCUL 302 / WOMENSTD 302: Sex and Gender in Japan
  • HISTORY 272 / AAS 262: Modern Civil Rights Movement
  • HISTORY 349 / LACS 349: Revolutionary Movements in Modern Latin America
  • HISTORY 454 / AMCULT 353 / ASIANPAM 353: Asians in American Film and Television
  • INTLSTD 401: International Studies Advanced Seminar, section titled “Women and Islam: The Politics of Representation”
  • LACS 349 / HISTORY 349: Revolutionary Movements in Modern Latin America
  • LING / ANTHRCUL 370: Language and Discrimination (F17)
  • MIDEAST 275 / AMCULT 215 / ARABAM 215: Introduction to Arab-American Studies
  • ORGSTUDY 203 / ENVIRON 203: Activism
  • PSYCH 280: Introduction to Social Psychology
  • PSYCH 291 / WOMENSTD 291: Introduction to the Psychology of Women and Gender
  • PSYCH 312 / ALA 228 / SOC 375: Intergroup Conflict & Coexistence: Religion, Ethnicity, & Culture
  • PSYCH 353: Social Development
  • RCSSCI 360: Social Science Junior Seminar, section titled “Transgender Politics and Community Action”
  • SM 421 / WOMENSTD 421: Gender and Sport
  • SOC 345 / WOMENSTD 348: Sociology of Sexuality
  • SOC 346: Sociology of the Body
  • SOC 354: Law & Society (F17)
  • SOC 368: Criminology
  • SOC 375 / ALA 228 / PSYCH 312: Intergroup Conflict & Coexistence: Religion, Ethnicity, & Culture
  • SOC 447 / WOMENSTD 447: Sociology of Gender
  • SOC 458: Sociology of Education
  • WOMENSTD 240 / AMCULT 240: Introduction to Women’s Studies
  • WOMENSTD 245: Introduction to LGBT and Queer Studies
  • WOMENSTD 291 / PSYCH 291: Introduction to the Psychology of Women and Gender
  • WOMENSTD 302 / ANTHRCUL 302 / HISTART 302: Sex and Gender in Japan
  • WOMENSTD / ENGLISH 315: Women and Literature (F17)
  • WOMENSTD / AAS 328: Women, Agency & Sexual Safety (F17)
  • WOMENSTD 330: Feminist Thought
  • WOMENSTD 331: Feminist Theoretical Perspectives in Gender & Health (F17)
  • WOMENSTD / AAS / COMM 334: Race and Video Games (F17)
  • WOMENSTD 348 / SOC 345: Sociology of Sexuality
  • WOMENSTD / AAS 381 / ENGLISH 380: Fictions and Feminisms (F17)
  • WOMENSTD 411 / AMCULT 411: Rednecks, Queers, and Country Music
  • WOMENSTD 421 / SM 421: Gender and Sport
  • WOMENSTD / AAS 443: Pedagogy of Empowerment (F17)
  • WOMENSTD 447 / SOC 447: Sociology of Gender

Intergroup Relations Education (Winter 2015 - Summer 2015)

Effective  Winter 2015 - Summer 2015

Intergroup education is a growing area of study focused on intergroup contact across social identities, the examination of inequality and conflict, and how groups build coalitions in the face of power inequities. More than ever, it is crucial for students to become competent national and global citizens, prepared to understand this nation’s history and to work across social divisions and conflict toward a more just and peaceful world. This minor intends to build on over 60 years of intergroup relations theory and research, through the use of engaged and interactive pedagogies to help students gain academic knowledge and apply this knowledge to the promotion of positive intergroup relations and civic leadership. Students will learn about theory, research and praxis by gaining knowledge and skills, and by linking concepts to skills. More specifically, the minor focuses on multiple issues in intergroup relations, such as social identity, prejudice and discrimination, inequalities of opportunity and power, and leadership in social justice-oriented change. Additionally, there is an emphasis on engaged pedagogy and utilizing process to complement the intergroup content.

The IGR education minor emphasizes building skills that can translate across many disciplines or work-life foci. The IGR education minor develops skills for understanding social inequality within societal systems and for working alongside community members to address social inequality wherever our students work or live and

Goals of the Minor

Develop an increased awareness of oneself as an individual and as a member of a social identity group.

  1. Examine theories of social identity development.
  2. Locate oneself in systems of historic and contemporary advantage and disadvantage.
  3. Understand basic intergroup concepts (e.g., social inequality and social justice, prejudice and discrimination, privilege and oppression) and use them to discuss and analyze complex issues addressed throughout the minor.
  4. Examine the impact of social identity group membership in a variety of settings.
  5. Explore racial, class and gender groups’ histories and their commonalities and differences
  6. Understand the complexities of intersectionality as a meta-theory and a source of multiple identities.

Courses: UC 122 / SOC 122/ PSYCH 122; UC 218/ SOC 218/ PSYCH 218; UC 320 / SOC 320 / PSYCH 310; UC 421

Research Practicums: UC 325, PSYCH 326, or SOC 394

Identify the role that culture and societal institutions play in patterns of disadvantage/oppression and advantage/entitlement that occur on the basis of race, ethnicity, gender, and other social identities.

  1. Examine how societal norms shape our worldviews and how we understand and communicate with those around us.
  2. Understand how social systems (e.g., colleges, corporations, non-profit organizations, communities) reflect broader historic and contemporary patterns of advantage/disadvantage.
  3. Explore how theories of social and human capital explain patterns of inequality.
  4. Understand the ways in which social groups’ histories are reflected in students’ personal narratives of their social identity group memberships.

Courses: UC 218 / SOC 218 or  PSYCH 218; UC 320 / SOC 320 / PSYCH 310; UC 321 / SOC 321/ PSYCH 311; UC 421

Develop effective skills in inquiry, communication, conflict exploration, small group dynamics and leadership.

  1. Prepare students in the skills required for democratic leadership in communities and a multicultural society/ global world.
  2. Prepare students to apply their knowledge of intergroup education in a variety of settings: dialogue facilitation, community outreach, research laboratories, and workplace situations.
  3. Understand theories and research about small group dynamics and develop skills in working with issues of difference and inequality in such settings.
  4. Translate educational research into pedagogical practice and self and other inquiry/learning designs.
  5. Understand and practice how to deal with interpersonal and intergroup conflict in productive and peaceful ways.

Courses: UC 122 / SOC 122/ PSYCH 122; UC 320 / SOC 320 / PSYCH 310; UC 321/ SOC 321 / PSYCH 311; UC 421

Research Practicum: UC 325, PSYCH 326, or SOC 394; UC 471 / SOC 471 / PSYCH 411

Explore theories and historic examples of social change

  1. Increase understanding of the ways in which people and groups have organized and acted in pursuit of social equality and justice and the ways in which counter-efforts have reacted and proceeded.
  2. Explore the role of social justice-oriented advocacy and coalition building in both one’s daily life and career goals.
  3. Analyze historic efforts at intergroup relationship-building and boundary-crossing and their meaning for one’s personal individual behaviors.
  4. Identify social movements and personal actions that contribute to the creation of socially just communities.

Courses: UC 122 / SOC 122 / PSYCH 122; UC 321 / SOC 321 / PSYCH 311; UC 421; UC 471 / SOC 471 / PSYCH 411

This minor offers students opportunities to explore social identities in the context of understanding social inequality and to become critical thinkers and creative and adaptive problem-solvers. The minor is primarily for students in the social sciences and humanities who want to integrate engaged learning pedagogy with an applied emphasis into their major coursework areas such as sociology, psychology, political science, languages, international studies, history, and organizational studies. The minor will be attractive to students who are considering graduate education in professional schools, for example, public health, education, law, public policy, social work, and who would like to build capacity for understanding inequality and working across difference. Michigan students will be more prepared for professional practice by incorporating intergroup education that complements their liberal arts education. Finally, while the minor is primarily for these specific groups of majors, we believe all students will benefit from the courses in the proposed minor.

The minor is intentionally progressive, and builds on the foundational knowledge of intergroup relations, social identity development, and inequality/justice to an increasingly complex understanding and ability to analyze and act in ways that further positive intellectual, intergroup and civic leadership. Students who are interested in developing facilitative leadership skills, with an emphasis on understanding group dynamics, intercultural communication, social identity awareness and leading groups will be particularly interested in the Facilitative Leadership track. This is primarily a course-based training ground. Students who are interested in deepening their analytical skills through the research process or by studying intergroup issues in campus communities will be most interested in the Campus Communities and Research track. This is the examination of intergroup issues in out-of-class and applied research settings.

Prerequisites to the Minor

None

Requirements for the Minor

A minimum of 19 credits, from the following categories as stated:

  1. Foundation Core Courses. Elect both:
    1. UC 122/ PSYCH 122/ SOC 122: Intergroup Dialogues
    2. UC 218 / SOC 218: Foundations of Intergroup Relations
      or
      PSYCH 218: Sophomore Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science (section titled “Foundations of Intergroup Relations”)

    The two courses provide the foundational theory and pedagogy of the minor. Intergroup dialogues give students the beginning tools to work across difference. They learn introductory social science concepts about inequality and experience conflict by working across difference. The Foundations of Intergroup Relations course gives students a solid overview of historical and contemporary structures of inequality, and examines the theory behind how social identity groups form, and how bias develops (prejudice, stereotyping, and discrimination). These two courses also explore how people develop an understanding of their own social identity group membership, how groups are impacted by privilege and power dynamics, and how to develop advocacy for groups to which one does not belong.

  2. Praxis Core Courses emphasize praxis, the engagement of theory with practice and reflection. Choose one of the following tracks:
    1. The Facilitative Leadership Track (7 credits) prepares students to lead others in addressing the demographic and democratic challenges posed by inequality. The practice focus occurs in the classroom, where students lead others in intergroup dialogue.
      • UC 320 / SOC 320 / PSYCH 310: Processes of Intergroup Dialogues Facilitation
      • UC 321 / SOC 321 / PSYCH 311: Practicum in Facilitating Intergroup Dialogues.
    2. The Campus Communities and Research Track (9 credits) allows students to explore praxis in broader community and research contexts and prepares them to understand inequality and develop coalitions for social justice work.
      • Statistics. STATS 250 or SOC 210.
        Students may request to substitute another research methods class other than STATS 250 or SOC 210. 
      • Social Psychology in Community Settings (UC 421) prepares students to recognize when social identities play a role in inequalities both on and off campus, to intervene in constructive ways when this happens, and to learn to act as peer educators in community settings, including residence halls and other campus-based settings.
      • IGR Research Practicum (UC 325, PSYCH 326, or SOC 394) allows students to practice intergroup skills in a more traditional academic setting: the research laboratory, as they are deepening their intergroup learning through the research process.
  3. Elective Course: Students take at least one 3- or 4-credit course in another academic unit that complement the goals of the minor. Students may also propose additional courses for consideration. The criteria used for selection include: The course must address social identities and intergroup relations in some way, and the course should discuss issues of inequality, power, privilege, and oppression or should focus on leadership and social change.
  4. IGR Senior Capstone: UC 471 / SOC 471 / PSYCH 411  IGR Senior Capstone: Social Justice in the Real World – an interdisciplinary experience to connect their learning throughout the minor. Students consider the broad national and global challenges facing their generation and examine them using realworld settings.

Intergroup Relations Education Approved Electives

  • AAPTIS 210 / AMCULT 215 / ARABAM 215: Introduction to Arab-American Studies
  • AAS 202: Introduction to Afro-Caribbean Studies
  • AAS 248: Crime, Race, and the Law
  • AAS 262 / HISTORY 272: Modern Civil Rights Movement
  • AAS 263: Race, Housing, and Employment
  • AAS 358: Topics in Black World Studies (section titled “Race, Racism, and American Humor”)
  • AAS 451: Law, Race, and the Historical Process, II
  • AMCULT 215 / ARABAM 215 / AAPTIS 210: Introduction to Arab-American Studies
  • AMCULT 217 / NATIVAM 217: Introduction to Native American Studies
  • AMCULT 240 / WOMENSTD 240: Introduction to Women’s Studies
  • AMCULT 353 / ASIANPAM 353 / HISTORY 454: Asians in American Film and Television
  • AMCULT 411 / WOMENSTD 411: Rednecks, Queers, and Country Music
  • ANTHRCUL 302 / WOMENSTD 302 / HISTART 302: Sex and Gender in Japan
  • ARABAM 215 / AMCULT 215 / AAPTIS 210: Introduction to Arab-American Studies
  • ASIANPAM 353 / AMCULT 353 / HISTORY 454: Asians in American Film and Television
  • COMM 428: Gender, Media, and the Law
  • EDUC 463: Web-Based Mentorship: Arab-Israel Conflict Simulation
  • ENVIRON 203 / ORGSTUDY 203: Activism
  • HISTART 302 / ANTHRCUL 302 / WOMENSTD 302: Sex and Gender in Japan
  • HISTORY 272 / AAS 262: Modern Civil Rights Movement
  • HISTORY 349 / LACS 349: Revolutionary Movements in Modern Latin America
  • HISTORY 454 / AMCULT 353 / ASIANPAM 353: Asians in American Film and Television
  • INTLSTD 401: International Studies Advanced Seminar (section titled “Women and Islam: The Politics of Representation”)
  • LACS 349 / HISTORY 349: Revolutionary Movements in Modern Latin America
  • ORGSTUDY 203 / ENVIRON 203: Activism
  • PSYCH 280: Introduction to Social Psychology
  • PSYCH 291 / WOMENSTD 291: Introduction to the Psychology of Women and Gender
  • PSYCH 312 / UC 375 / SOC 375: Intergroup Conflict & Coexistence: Religion, Ethnicity, & Culture
  • PSYCH 353: Social Development
  • RCSSCI 360: Social Science Junior Seminar (section titled “Transgender Politics and Community Action”)
  • SM 421 / WOMENSTD 421: Gender and Sport
  • SOC 345 / WOMENSTD 348: Sociology of Sexuality
  • SOC 346: Sociology of the Body
  • SOC 368: Criminology
  • SOC 375 / UC 375 / PSYCH 312: Intergroup Conflict & Coexistence: Religion, Ethnicity, & Culture
  • SOC 447 / WOMENSTD 447: Sociology of Gender
  • SOC 458: Sociology of Education
  • UC 375 / SOC 375 / PSYCH 312: Intergroup Conflict & Coexistence: Religion, Ethnicity, & Culture
  • WOMENSTD 240 / AMCULT 240: Introduction to Women’s Studies
  • WOMENSTD 245: Introduction to LGBT and Queer Studies
  • WOMENSTD 291 / PSYCH 291: Introduction to the Psychology of Women and Gender
  • WOMENSTD 302 / ANTHRCUL 302 / HISTART 302: Sex and Gender in Japan
  • WOMENSTD 330: Feminist Thought
  • WOMENSTD 348 / SOC 345: Sociology of Sexuality
  • WOMENSTD 411 / AMCULT 411: Rednecks, Queers, and Country Music
  • WOMENSTD 421 / SM 421: Gender and Sport
  • WOMENSTD 447 / SOC 447: Sociology of Gender