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Current Courses

Fall 2017

LHSP 125

LHSP 125.001

Writing and Seeing

Mondays & Wednesdays: 9:30-11:00am

Instructor: Scott Beal

Location: Alice Lloyd Hall, 2012

Course Description

When William Blake wrote in 1799, "As the Eye is formed such are its Powers," he noted what we see is shaped by who we are and what we believe. Almost 200 years later, Alice Fulton wrote "let my glance be passional / toward the universe and you," calling for vision as an active approach to the world, a form of attention that clarifies truths and embraces hidden possibilities. In this course we will use writing to explore our visions of ourselves and each other, of our natures and cultures. We will investigate art and artefacts --some we know well, and some we will discover on field trips to museums and other spots of interest -- to question how they both embody and challenge our ways of seeing. Writing is often (as John Berger has pointed out) "an attempt to explain how, either metaphorically or literally, 'you see things.'" Our course will engage with all aspects of the writing process, from brainstorming and research to collaboration and revision -- to make our glances more passional, to see our subjects more sharply and deeply, and to communicate our ways of seeing most effectively to audiences.

LHSP 125

LHSP 125.002

Creative Obsessions and Writing

Mondays & Wednesdays: 10:00-11:30am

Instructor: Carol Tell

Location: Alice Lloyd Hall, 2060

Course Description

What are your obsessions? Are they quirky and unique (and maybe embarrassing) (a schlocky song, a character from a book, your family recipe for meatloaf), or more mainstream but no less haunting (a love interest, a sports team, the number of likes you get on Instagram)? From childhood crushes to white whales, our obsessions can be self-defining and often drive us to write/creat beautiful things. But as much as they define us, they can occasionally delude or even destroy us.

 

This introductory writing class will allow you to explore -- and write about -- intellectual, aesthetic, and personal obsessions -- both your own and those of writers, artists, film-makers, and musicians. We'll read texts (from such writers as Helen MacDonald, David Foster Wallace, James Baldwin, JK Rowling, Jon Krakauer), and watch films (possibly Brokeback Mountain, Rear Window, others), and listen to podcasts (Serial and others), all of which explore obsessive love, work, and creativity. But most of all, you'll be figuring out how to write effectively for college -- how to parse a writing prompt, what words like "argument" and "revision" really mean, and how to move (quickly) beyond the five-paragraph essay.

LHSP 125

LHSP 125.003

Genre Wonderland

Mondays & Wednesdays: 2:30-4:00pm

Instructor: Ray McDaniel

Location: Alice Lloyd Hall, Classroom 2060

Course Description

Noir, fantasy, romantic comedy, thriller, horror: we take categories like these for granted when we talk about film or literature, but what (if anything) do they have to do with how we imagine and narrate our own lives? In this section of LHSP 125, we will examine: what it means, why it has to exist, whether anything exists outside of it, how we use it to construct experience and knowledge as consumers, scholars and people just trying to make sense of it all. Texts will include both literature and multimedia references both high and low, common and obscure, and skills will be developed in analysis, argument, narrative, and writing into and across academic curricula. Tolerance for stylistic excess encouraged but not required.

LHSP 125

LHSP 125.005

Writing and Photography

Tuesdays & Thursdays: 10:00-11:30am

Instructor: Angela Berkley

Location: Alice Lloyd Hall, Classroom 2012

Course Description

Photographs matter: we cherish photos of our friends and loved ones, whether in material or digital form, and we rely on photos to show us evidence of horrors or wonders we might not otherwise believe. I hereby claim the following: images get under our skin, they prove things, and they make things happen. Throughout the course of this semester, we will be reading, talking -- and most of all, writing -- to interrogate these claims about the power of the photographic image. The best essays start with genuine interrogations, and in this class, photographs and photography will be the stimulus we use to spark our curious questions. You will look long and hard at photographs, and you will write about what you see and what it means. You will read, discuss, summarize and analyze important theories and ideas about photography, as well as contemporary debates about how photographs signify and function in our world today. You will enter into these debates and conversations, writing essays that consider and respond cogently and argue persuasively for a particular way of seeing and understanding photographs.

 

The old saying about a picture being worth a thousand words is a cliché we will not stoop to use in our own critical appraisals of photographs. Let us, instead, use this tiresome old claim in the age old competition between image and word as an invigorating challenge: let us search for what it is that makes photographs seem to say so much, and let us read, write, revise and write again toward essays as potent as any thousand-word photograph.

LHSP 125

LHSP 125.006

Your Best Version: Writing and Representation

Tuesdays & Thursdays: 1:00-2:30pm

Instructor: Julia Babock

Location: Alice Lloyd Hall, Classroom 2060

Course Description

Instagram. Twitter. Snapchat. Finnstagram. There are more opportunities to creat and curate versions of ourselves than ever before. These opportunities have also led to skepticism about truth and authenticity. If everything is a version, then what are the criteria that makes one version better, more accurate, or more necessary than another?

 

In this course, we will be exploring multiple versions of the same stories in order to explore answers to this question. In the process, you will practice and increase your ability to analyze, to argue, and to connect to communities that share similar passions and concerns. Writing will include a course blog, a narrative essay, an analytic essay, and a researched project where you get to choose a text and create your own new, best version.

 

Texts will include short stories, essays, film, music, journalism, histories, and art that connect to a wide range of civil rights issues. Get ready to watch Zorro movies, reimagine some fairy tales, listen to some Coltrane and hang out with Congressman John Lewis!

LHSP 125

LHSP 125.007

Our TV, Our Selves: The Rhetoric of Television

Tuesdays & Thursdays: 9:30-11:00am

Instructor: Shelley Manis

Location: Alice Lloyd Hall, Classroom 2012

Course Description

How many times have you heard someone say (or have you said), "It's just TV!" In this class, those, as they say, are "fightin' words." Television -- from high drama like Breaking Bad to goofy animation like Bob's Burgers -- makes meaning, makes arguments. Television both reflects and creates current attitudes about public issues; and it can and should inspire important, sometimes difficult, conversations. I've designed this course around one major question that should be important to those of us who love TV (or who hate it!), who live for the next episode of Scandal or the next season of Daredevil, or who can. not. even. with Game of Thrones: How does TV make meaning? How does it contribute to our senses of self -- as individuals, as citizens, or residents of the U.S. and/or other home nations, as [you-fill-in-the-blank-based-on-your-interests]? The content that we study will be television; the end result of our study will be an intimate relationship with rigorous thinking, writing, and revising processes.

 

We will practice strategies of close reading, thick description, research, analysis, reflection, revision, and responding in writing to a variety of texts: television episodes and series (some chosen by me, some by you), academic articles, podcasts, and mainstream publications. We will engage in the kinds of tasks you will be asked to do often as a college student: blogging, social media writing, informal writing, planning and conducting research, review writing, analytical essay writing, etc. We will argue about the virtues and shortcomings of the shows we watch. We will disagree (respectfully but enthusaistically) about all manner of things. We will "live every week like it's shark week." This will all help you look anew at something you likely know well (TV) as you practice making dynamic, savvy, even artistic academic arguments. And we'll hopefully have a lot of fun doing it. "Clear eyes, full hearts, can't lose."

LHSP 230

LHSP 230.001

 

 

Instructor: Micheline Maynard

Location: Alice Lloyd Hall, Classroom 2012

Course Description

LHSP 230

English 230.002

Tuesdays & Thursdays: 5:00-7:00pm

Instructor: Mark Tucker

Location: Alice Lloyd Hall, Art Studio

Course Description

Students in this class will co-design a creative community which will help initiate and produce public artwork for ArtPrize (Grand Rapids, Michigan), the U-M Bicentennial and YES -- Ypsilanti Experimental Space (Ypsilanti, Michigan). Through inventive planning, organization, logistics, and implementation students will have the opportunity to work together with other communities to expereince first-hand what it takes to create their own relevant public arts exhibitions/performances'installations. Additionally, students will attend artist talks and performances and will disseminate these vareid creative expereinces via dynamic group discussions and written reflections.

 

This course is limited to sophomore student leaders in the Lloyd Hall Scholars Program.

Winter 2017 Course Archive

LHSP 140

LHSP 140.001

From Kansas to Munchkinland

Tuesdays & Thursdays: 6:00pm-8:00pm

Instructor: Mark Tucker

Location: Alice Lloyd Hall, Art Studio

Close your eyes and imagine that you were born completely without sight. Now imagine that your sight was miraculously restored. What would you “see”? Look at your hand and wiggle your fingers. Is this what you expected your hand to look like? Would you be able to comprehend the world around you or would everything be such a confusing mass of shapes, lines, colors, textures, spaces, shadows and light that you would feel overwhelmed by the complexity of it all?

In this course we will demystify the art of seeing. Learning to draw and paint requires you to look at the world more closely and to record what you see more accurately. Learning to see, not what you “think” you see, but what you actually see, is the key that can unlock the door to your inner vision. Once you can access visual phenomenon through drawing and painting you will find out how much there is to see and how beautiful things really are.

One half of the course will be in black and white, drawing the human body; something simultaneously intimate and yet completely foreign. The second half of the course will concentrate on seeing the world in color through painting.

No previous experience necessary, however due to the rigorous nature of the course, students will be expected to possess a positive, open attitude and strong work ethic.

Note: There is a $150 lab fee, which covers the hiring of the model(s) and all art supplies. Mandatory attendance and active class participation required. Expect extensive outside work on homework assignments. Museum trips (TBA) may be required.

 

 

LHSP 140

LHSP 140.002

Art in Public Spaces/Festifools

Fridays: 2:30pm-5:30pm

Instructor: Mark Tucker

Location: Alice Lloyd Hall, Art Studio

In this creative course students from all disciplines will be designing and producing their own large-scale animated sculptures, or “puppets” which will be featured in our 11th annual FestiFools extravaganza to be held on Main Street in downtown Ann Arbor on April 9th, 2017. (See: FestiFools.org) As the originators of this artistic spectacle, students in this class will design, organize, and develop FestiFools in conjunction with local community, civic, and business partners.

This will be a full ‘hands-on’ experience which will explore techniques and tools for the making of large-scale theatrical and sculptural elements for the creation of large-scale public spectacles. Although this course does not require any previous art experience, due to the public nature of the projects, it will be expected that the student already possess an excellent work ethic, great attitude, and the ability to grasp and apply aesthetic principles quickly, in a team oriented, community-minded environment.

Studio/lab work outside of course will be individually tailored to students’ schedules (TBD on first day of class).

Lab Fee $150

 

 

LHSP 228

LHSP 228.001

The Rhetoric and Representation of Race and Ethnicity

Mondays & Wednesdays: 10:30am-12:00pm

Instructor: Paul Barron

Location: Alice Lloyd Hall, Classroom 2060

“The diverse groups that make up the United States provide a rich source of stories to draw upon, but in a deeply racialized society stained by structural racism, not all stories are equally, acknowledged, valued, or affirmed…Some stories are supported by the power structure, while others must fight tenaciously to be heard.”

--Lee Anne Bell, Storytelling for Social Justice

Bell's words imply two meanings of “telling stories”: by telling and being open to many different stories we can expand our understanding of what it means to live in this country; but also, stories themselves are “telling,” or revealing of, a deeper understanding of how power has worked and continues to work to shape narratives around race. In this course on writing and rhetoric you will examine an array of stories that shed light on race and ethnicity, as well as learning a set of critical perspectives to be able to look beyond the surface of the stories apparent in all sorts of texts, including film, television, speeches, images, articles, and videos. Course materials will also include fiction, poetry, photographs, art, comedy, and music. Writing for this class includes a personal journal in which you track your responses and the development of your ideas, an end of semester reflection, and three papers examining the ways in which different sorts of story “tell” us something about which “stories are supported,” and why and how others “must fight tenaciously to be heard.”

 

 

LHSP 230

LHSP 230.001

Poetry, Magic, and Science

Mondays & Wednesdays: 9:30am-11:00am

Instructor: Scott Beal

Location: Alice Lloyd Hall, Classroom 2012

Can a poem lift a curse or turn lead into gold? Can it make sense of cell biology or mimic fractals? Poetry has a rich history of association with both magic and science. We may describe a poem as “experimental” or say it has “transformed” us. However, we commonly see science and magic in opposition. (Consider Arthur Weasley's enduring bewilderment over muggle technology as one illustration.) This course will invite students to question how these seemingly opposing forces operate within poetry, and to practice their own poetics of scientific verbal magic. To develop our thinking we will read critical essays, magical and scientific treatises, and a large variety of poems with an emphasis on contemporary poets. Writing assignments will include critical reflections and close readings as well as a hefty dose of creative writing, building toward a final portfolio of poems that enacts each student's vision for how science and magic collide. No expertise with poetry, science, or witchcraft required. We will use in-class exercises to play with concepts and construction of poems, and both skeptics and avid poets should leave the course with a richer understanding and enjoyment of poetry.

 

 

LHSP 230

LHSP 230.002

Theater for Social Change: Resistance & Progress

Tuesdays & Thursdays: 11:00am-12:30pm

Instructor: Shelley Manis

Location: Alice Lloyd Hall, Classroom 2060

Why does theatre matter? “The theatre, when it’s good, is always dangerous.” So Hallie Flanagan, the Director of the Federal Theatre Project (1935-1939), famously said in response to accusations that the Living Newspapers and other FTP productions were “dangerous,” potential agents of social upheaval. In large part because of the fear of what theatre could do, the FTP was shut down in 1939. Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright and Emmy winning screenwriter Tony Kushner has argued that “art is not merely contemplation, it also action, and all action changes the world, at least a little.” In this course we will pursue answers to two questions: What makes theatre “good” (and hence, “dangerous”)?, and can theatre make change in the world? We will explore a few historical moments in world theatre, specifically considering how theater practices have imagined and enacted resistance to the status quo socially and artistically.

The content of this course will be case studies of plays written and/or performed in response to fraught issues of their times: plays about feminism and women’s issues, plays about labor, plays about war, and plays about race, among others. With each play we read, we will read and discuss one or two articles that put the plays in context and/or outline a theory useful to understanding the plays. We will also, as a class, determine a social intervention we’d like to make on our campus, select and/or create a play that enacts that intervention, and mount a performance (either a staged reading or a full production, depending on what we choose) to put our ideas into action.

While we will be creating a LOT of on-our-feet creative work, we will also be doing a number of different kinds of writing this semester. In addition to formal (one brief, one a little longer) revised essays, we will create small reading responses and other low-stakes writing assignments—such as script analysis exercises, annotations, close readings, quick applications of research, visual inspiration, etc.—designed to give you experience responding to drama and thinking about the socially significant work theater can do in a multitude of forms and modes. We’ll also do a variety of types of reflective writing.

 

 

LHSP 230

LHSP 230.003

The Children's Story: Re-imagining Children's Literature

Tuesdays & Thursdays: 1:00pm-2:30pm

Instructor: Carol Tell

Location: Alice Lloyd Hall, Classroom 2060

Do you have a favorite children’s book? One that seems to grow and deepen as you’ve gotten older? Have you ever wanted to write one?

The best children's books and films stay with us, and often feel mislabeled as exclusively for “children." Rather than dismiss these pieces of artwork as childish and inconsequential, in this class we will embrace their artistry, sophistication, humanity, and complexity. We will examine different genres of children's literature: storybooks (remember Cat in the Hat? Where the Wild Things Are?), fairy tales, children's poetry (Blake's Songs of Innocence, Shel Silverstein), and young adult novels. We will also watch The Wizard of Oz and one other film. But the emphasis will be on your own creative work. For your culminating big project, you will write and illustrate your own children's book.

 

 

LHSP 230

LHSP 230.004

Photobook: The Artifact and The Project

Tuesdays & Thursdays: 2:00pm-3:30pm

Instructor: T. Hetzel

Location: Alice Lloyd Hall, Classroom 2012

For this class, we will begin to explore the history of the photobook as we investigate our relationship to images and the stories we can tell with them. We will consider the photobook as an artistic endeavor, an artifact and a project.

We will study The Americans (1959) by Robert Frank, and, by using it as a model, you will make your first photobook titled The Wolverines. We will explore a range of photobooks including ones by Helen Levitt, Elliott Erwitt, Weegee, Daido Moriyama, and Cindy Sherman. We also will have an opportunity to see rare photobooks from the Art, Architecture & Engineering Library’s special collections, including Edward Ruscha’s Every Building on the Sunset Strip and Twentysix Gasoline Stations.

By the end of the term, you will have taken many photos, created a photobook called The Wolverines, and also designed and built a photobook of your own chosen subject. We’ll experiment with the beauty and strangeness of the photobook’s possibilities. What story will you tell? What will you reveal?

 

 

English 223

English 223.002

Mondays & Wednesdays: 12:00pm-1:30pm

Instructor: Patricia Khleif

Location: Alice Lloyd Hall, Classroom 2012

This course will function as an introduction to the strategies for successfully reading and writing poetry and short fiction. Good writing starts with good reading, and this course will focus on developing strategies for close, comprehensive reading in order to advance creative writing skills. You will read and study examples of published poetry and prose in order to better understand the craft of writing in these two genres. This class will rely heavily on the workshop model, which means you will engage in the close study and critique of classmates work as well. The workshop process helps you become proficient in offering critical feedback on poetry and fiction. The workshop process also helps you to hone your own writing skills and establish successful strategies for expanding and revising their work. You will be asked to develop a number of original creative compositions and will be responsible for daily writing assignments and a revised portfolio of writing. An important aspect of this course will be revision and progression throughout the semester based on workshop feedback and individual work with the instructor. This course will challenge participants to read often, write frequently, and participate in class discussions, projects, and experiments. The final goal of this course, along with a better understanding of how to read and write poetry and fiction, is to explore individual creative writing goals and projects.

Fall 2016 Course Archive

LHSP 125

LHSP 125.001

Title: Writing and Film

Instructor: Carol Tell

This writing course will introduce you to college-level writing through an investigation of film. Along with viewing and analyzing a variety of films, you will analyze film reviews (summary, analysis, evaluation, persuasion) and develop a movie blog. You will also collaborate with peers to select, introduce, and discuss films for our class film series. Our readings will include a range of texts and will tackle the idea of adaptation. You will also consider the rhetorical strategies of argumentation employed in films, including documentaries and political satire. But most of all, you’ll be figuring out how to write effectively for college—how to parse a writing prompt, what revision really means, and how to move (quickly) beyond the five-paragraph essay. 

Please note that this is not a film course, in which you learn the techniques of film production or formal analysis. Rather, we’re simply using this powerful and potent medium in order to develop our skills in critical reading and writing. 

 

LHSP 125

LHSP 125.002

Title: Writing and Seeing

Instructor: Scott Beal

When William Blake wrote in 1799, “As the Eye is formed such are its Powers,” he noted that vision is not objective; what we see is shaped by who we are and what we believe. Almost 200 years later, Alice Fulton ended her poem “Cascade Experiment” with the lines, “…let my glance be passional / toward the universe and you.” Here Fulton calls for vision as an active approach to the world, a form of attention that clarifies truths and embraces hidden possibilities. In this course we will explore through writing how our ways of seeing ourselves and each other, our natures and cultures, are shaped by artists, writers, and producers. And we will use writing to activate our ways of seeing – to let our glances be more passional, to see our subjects more sharply and more deeply. Writing is often (as John Berger has pointed out) “an attempt to explain how, either metaphorically or literally, ‘you see things.’” Our course will engage with all aspects of the writing process, from brainstorming and research to collaboration and revision, to communicate our ways of seeing most effectively to audiences.

 

LHSP 125

LHSP 125.003

Title: What You See is What You Get: Exploring Image and Identity of Place and People through Street Photography

Instructor: T. Hetzel

This first-year writing course invites you to think and write about image and identity using street photography as our lens.  How do images illuminate or disguise a truth?  How can images build an argument?  Or tell a story?

As we ask these questions and more, our class will first investigate and analyze the changing image and identity of Detroit and take a class trip to the city with our notebooks and cameras (&/or phones!).  Later we will explore the work of street photographers before turning the focus on our own experiences taking photographs of people and places in Ann Arbor and the University of Michigan. 

During the term, we will examine the work of photographers, writers, activists and artists including Tyree Guyton, Grace Lee Boggs, Helen Levitt, Joel Meyerowitz, and Brian Day.  We will watch and deconstruct films that may include Detropia, American Revolutionary: The Evolution of Grace Lee Boggs, and Finding Vivian Maier.  Students will take their own original photos and produce new prose – analytical, reflective and imaginative--as we explore academic argument and the interplay of text and image. We’ll draft and revise essays, have pitch meetings and workshops, and create photo essays.  We will examine the power and potential of visual rhetoric while working toward a final photo essay project of each student's own design. 

Is what you see what you get?  What will you discover and reveal about the world?   

 

LHSP 125

LHSP 125.004

Title: Writers Writing About Writing: On Rhetoric and Voice

Instuctor: Louis Cicciarelli

In Words Like Loaded Pistols (2012), Sam Leith says that "rhetoric is language at play--language plus." His book on rhetoric will provide a backdrop to our study of writing in this first-year writing course. We will read and analyze rhetoric in academic writing, fiction, film, adaptions, current visual and cultural artifacts, and political speech to better understand the ways rhetoric and voice work.  And we'll get to play with language in our own academic and creative writing. 

Our course will center your position as the writer and raise questions about how we "play with language" and develop the range of our writing voices to reach various audiences.  Students will write three academic essays, one creative story project, and contribute regular responses to a course blog.  This class will emphasize the practice of revision in the development of good college-level writing; we will cultivate revision strategies, using both peer and whole-class workshops, to produce our best work.  Through the course, students will grow as critical readers, thinkers, and writers able to communicate in an academic community.  Ultimately, this class will improve your ability to write clear, organized, and cohesive essays -- and improve your confidence and your skills as both interpreters and communicators of ideas and information. 

 

LHSP 125

LHSP 125.005

Title: Telling True Stories

Instructor: David Karczynski

LHSP 125, Telling True Stories, will provide you with a chance to practice and hone your thinking and writing skills in ways that will serve you during your college years and beyond.  The writing we’ll do borrows from conventions of long-form investigative journalism in that we’ll be asking big questions and telling complex stories in our attempts to answer them.  Each of the four essays we write will have a different center and a different purpose.  During the course of the term you will write a personal narrative, undertake a journey, conduct a social experiment and write an in-depth profile.  In writing these essays and investigating the questions they raise, you’ll also be developing your toolkit of academic inquiry. You’ll learn how do research both while sitting at the computer and while moving through a living, breathing city. You’ll learn how to argue using evidence, how to persuade using rhetoric and how to evoke using imagistic language.  By the end of the semester, my hope is that you will have new and exciting lenses through which to perceive your world and your place in it. 

In addition to doing a lot of writing (both inside and outside of the classroom), we will also focus on strategies for reading and analyzing a variety of texts.  We will also do a lot of talking; think of this class less as a lecture than as a discussion group, one in which everyone will be expected to make meaningful contributions on a daily basis.  Last of all, this course is centered around the idea that the best writing comes from regular revision.  Through workshopping your drafts with your peers, you will obtain a better grasp on how significantly your writing can improve with each revision. Like a muscle, writing only gets stronger with use.   

 

LHSP 125

LHSP 125.006

Title: Alter Ego/Persona: Other Selves

Instructor: Paul Barron

“Do you not know that there comes a midnight hour when everyone has to throw off his mask?...I have seen men in real life who so long deceived others that at last their true nature could not reveal itself.”

—From Either/Or, by Søren Kierkegaard

What if, rather than having a singular true self, our “selves” are richer and more varied? What “masks” do we find ourselves wearing? Are they sometimes necessary, and do they change depending on our identities? Is it possible that experimenting with, trying on, and playing with identities, is also a kind of truth? Questions like these will emerge as leaping off points for thinking and discussion. But above all else, this is a writing course! You will get a thorough grounding in writing for college and will practice skills like weighing evidence, making claims, organization, and developing your writing towards increasing complexity.

You may be familiar with David Bowie’s alter ego Ziggy Stardust, or Nikki Minaj’s Roman and Barbie, etc. But what messages do these “other selves” communicate? And is there something about these messages that means they must be delivered via alter egos? A persona is a related kind of other self and refers to the ways we present and adapt ourselves purposefully, even playfully. As you write, draft, revise, and collaborate, you’ll consider, What is your voice as a writer? And how does it change depending on the subject, the audience, and genre? Do you have one true voice, or are there several types of voice you can employ depending on the circumstances?

We’ll draw from film, sports, drama, politics, fiction, poetry, and music journalism, and from a list of writers who offer rich entry points into these issues, such as: James Baldwin, Kobe Bryant, Anne Carson, Meghan Daum, Milan Kundera, Toni Morrison, Mark Landler, and Cheryl Strayed. We will also read the script for and view the UMS production of RoosevElvis, by The TEAM, a Brooklyn-based theater company.

 

LHSP 125

LHSP 125.007

Title: Our TV, Our Selves: The Rhetoric of Television

Instructor: Shelley Manis

How many times have you heard someone say (or have you said), “It’s just TV!” In this class, those, as they say, are “fightin’ words.” Television—from high drama like Breaking Bad to goofy animation like Bob’s Burgers—makes meaning, makes arguments. Television both reflects and creates current attitudes about public issues; and it can and should inspire important, sometimes difficult, conversations. I’ve designed this course around one major question that should be important to those of us who love TV (or who hate it!), who live for the next episode of Scandal or the next season of Daredevil, or who can. not. even. with Game of Thrones: How does TV make meaning? How does it contribute to our sense of self—as individuals, as a nation, as [you-fill-in-the-blank-based-on-your-interests]? The content that we study will be television; the end result of our study will be an intimate relationship with rigorous thinking, writing, and revising processes.

We will practice strategies of close reading, thick description, research, analysis, reflection, revision, and responding in writing to a variety of texts: television episodes and series (some chosen by me, some by you), academic articles, podcasts, and mainstream publications. We will engage in the kinds of tasks you will be asked to do often as a college student: blogging, social media writing, informal writing, planning and conducting research, review writing, analytical essay writing, etc. We will argue about the virtues and shortcomings of the shows we watch. We will disagree (respectfully but enthusiastically) about all manner of things. We will “live every week like it’s shark week.” This will all help you look anew at something you likely know well (tv) as you practice making dynamic, savvy, even artistic academic arguments. And we’ll hopefully have a lot of fun doing it. “Clear eyes, full hearts, can’t lose.”

 

LHSP 230

LHSP 230.001

Title: Literary Journal Editing and Publishing

Instructor: Alexander Weinstein

In this class you will learn the necessary techniques to critically discuss poetry, fiction, non-fiction, art, and music in order to become successful editors. We will examine a wide variety of leading national and international literary magazines and small press journals, focusing our attention on the creative work of contemporary writers. Much of this class will focus on gaining experience in literary editing and publishing in order to produce your own literary and art journals and online magazines. During the semester the class will take field trips to the Duederstadt center, Hatcher Library, and Hollanders to become familiarized with the resources available to you on campus and in the community. You will learn to use Adobe Creative Suite programs (including Photoshop and InDesign) as well as audio editing tools (Quick Time and Garage Band) in order to gain the experience and confidence needed to produce your own journals.  These workshops will lead to you creating your own posters (to advertise the LHSP Arts and Literary Journal), your own artistic/literary websites, and learning bookbinding to create your own print journal.  The class culminates with you designing and publishing you own printed literary journals. 

 

LHSP 230

LHSP 230.002

Title: Creative Communities

Instructor: Mark Tucker

From visiting artists and writers to world-renowned productions sponsored by UMS, the U-M campus has a thriving arts culture, with unique opportunities for students to engage with cutting-edge works and the artists who make them. Students in this course will attend readings, artist talks, performances, and other arts-related events, and will engage in dynamic group discussions, critical writing assignments, and creative expression projects.

Simultaneously, student leaders in this class will help initiate and produce a brand new public art project/event/performance to be unveiled in the Ann Arbor community in 2015/2016. Through inventive planning, organization, logistics and implementation students will have the opportunity to work together as a team to experience first-hand what it takes to create their own large-scale arts event while becoming a part of the vibrant creative arts community in Ann Arbor.

This course is limited to student leaders in the Lloyd Hall Scholars Program.

 

Writing 201

Writing 201.002

Title: Audio Essay

Instructor: Carol Tell

In this course on the audio essay, students will learn how to compose and publish their own podcasts, using a mixture of narration, interviews, sound effects, and music. Students will begin by developing several short sound-based narratives (“audio postcards”), focusing on such elements as voice, non-verbal sound, and interviews. Using the creative nonfiction genre as a model, students will then write an original audio essay, which they will record and workshop with their peers. In doing so they will examine what role sound plays in the development of voice and point of view, and what particular limitations and opportunities are afforded by writing in this medium. By listening to a variety of audio essays and shorter audio pieces, students will also learn effective techniques for pacing, audio layering, and balancing anecdote with reflection. 

Winter 2016 Course Archive

LHSP 130

LHSP 130.001

Title: Extravagant Nonsense: Exploring the Art of the Irrational and Impossible

Instructor: Scott Beal

“Why, sometimes I’ve believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast,” the White Queen boasts to Alice in Through the Looking Glass. In this class, such belief will be our mission. The nonsensical, the incredible, the supernatural, the fantastic –in this class we will believe it all. Or if belief is too much, we will experience and grapple with it together to understand its purposes and its delights. Through an eclectic range of texts (poetry, fiction, painting, collage, graphic novel, song, theater, film, and more) we will explore the unreal to discover how it can challenge or enlarge our understanding of the real. Students will complete a number of written assignments -- creative and analytical, individual and collaborative – and if we can’t make sense of our subject, we'll use it to make fuller sense of ourselves.

 

LHSP 140

LHSP 140.001

Title: Art in Public Spaces/FestiFools

Instructor: Mark Tucker

In this creative course students from all disciplines will be designing and producing their own large-scale animated sculptures, or “puppets” which will be featured in our tenth-annual FestiFools extravaganza to be held on Main Street in downtown Ann Arbor on April 3rd, 2016. (See: FestiFools.org) As the originators of this artistic spectacle, students in this class will design, organize, and develop FestiFools in conjunction with local community, civic, and business partners.

This will be a full ‘hands-on’ experience which will challenge students’ aesthetic assumptions while exploring techniques and tools for the making of large-scale theatrical and sculptural elements for the creation of large-scale public spectacles. Although this course does not require any previous art experience, due to the public nature of the projects, it will be expected that the student already possess an excellent work ethic, great attitude, and the ability to grasp and apply aesthetic principles quickly, in a physically demanding, team oriented, community-minded environment.

Studio/lab work outside of course will be individually tailored to students’ schedules (TBD on first day of class). The lab fee for this course is $150.

 

LHSP 140

LHSP 140.002

Title: From Kansas to Munchkin Land

Instructor: Mark Tucker

Close your eyes and imagine that you were born completely without sight. Now imagine that your sight was miraculously restored. What would you “see”? Look at your hand and wiggle your fingers. Is this what you expected your hand to look like? Would you be able to comprehend the world around you or would everything be such a confusing mass of shapes, lines, colors, textures, spaces, shadows and light that you would feel overwhelmed by the complexity of it all?

In this course we will demystify the art of seeing. Learning to draw and paint requires you to look at the world more closely and to record what you see more accurately. Learning to see, not what you “think” you see, but what you actually see, is the key that can unlock the door to your inner vision. Once you can access visual phenomenon through drawing and painting you will find out how much there is to see and how beautiful things really are.

One half of the course will be in black and white, drawing the human body; something simultaneously intimate and yet completely foreign. The second half of the course will concentrate on seeing the world in color through painting.

No previous experience necessary, however due to the rigorous nature of the course, students will be expected to possess a positive, open attitude and strong work ethic.

Note: There is a $150 lab fee, which covers the hiring of the model(s) and all art supplies. Mandatory attendance and active class participation required. Expect extensive outside work on homework assignments. Museum trips (TBA) may be required.

 

LHSP 140

LHSP 140.003

Title: Real and Surreal: Reconstructing Photographic Images

Instructor: Ray Wetzel

This class will use photography as a building block for creating works of art. Working with ordinary photographic equipment, digital images—altered and raw—can be mashed up, cut apart, reassembled, re-photographed, reconstructed, and reinserted into the contemporary environment. These transformations of the seen to the unseen can lead us to change our perspective of the daily world we immerse ourselves in.

 

LHSP 230

LHSP 230.001

Title: Tony Kushner & Social Justice

Instructor: Shelly Manis

You probably know Tony Kushner for his Oscar-nominated screenplays of 2012's Lincoln and 2005’s Munich (about terrorists who kidnapped and killed several Israeli athletes during the 1972 Olympics), both directed by Steven Spielberg. Also in 2005, HBO produced his self-adapted screenplay of his Pulitzer Prize-Winning Angels in America (starring Al Pacino, Meryl Streep, and a long list of other ridiculously amazing actors). In this class we'll read/watch these films as well as some of his other drama to think about how plays/screenplays in general "work" and how his kind of work argues for a complicated idea of "justice" in a complicated world. We’ll also read supplementary material (articles, poems, op-eds, etc.) that help us put Kushner’s work into perspective.

In a 1994 essay for Newsweek, “American Things,” Kushner refers repeatedly to the notion of “justice” without ever fully, explicitly, defining it. For him, justice in America is linked to democracy (with a lower-case “d”), as well as to a sense of collective responsibility to the past and to the future, to progress, to exploring the tensions “between the margin and the center, the many and the few, the individual and society, the dispossessed and the possessors.” In this class we’ll ask, among other things: What is justice? Do his plays/screenplays help advance it? If so, how?

In this writing-intensive course, we will read and write about Kushner’s plays and screenplays as dramaturgs do:

• by looking closely at the dramatic structure, language, content, and themes of the plays (that is, by analyzing their internal dramaturgy);
• by becoming conversant in the historical and artistic moments in which his plays appear (that is, by analyzing their contexts);
• by considering what implicit or explicit arguments his plays make or questions they ask; and ultimately
• by creating analytical production and outreach materials of different genres for a variety of audiences

 

LHSP 230

LHSP 230.002

Title: Photobook: The Artifact & the Project

Instructor: T Hetzel

In this class, we will explore the history of the photobook, and investigate our relationship
to images and the stories we can tell with them. We will consider the photobook as an
artistic endeavor, an artifact and a project. We will study The Americans (1959) by Robert
Frank, and, by using it as a model, you will make your first photobook titled The Wolverines
with the campus Espresso Book Machine.

We also will explore a range of photobooks including Weegee’s New York: Photographs, 1935-1960 and Cindy Sherman’s Untitled Film Stills. We will have an opportunity to see rare photobooks from the Art, Architecture & Engineering Library’s special collections, including Edward Ruscha’s Every Building on the Sunset Strip and Twentysix Gasoline Stations.

By the end of the term, you will have taken many photos, created a photo blog, and designed and built a photobook of your own chosen subject.

We’ll experiment with the beauty and strangeness of the photobook’s possibilities.
What is it to document a moment in time? What story will you tell? What will you reveal?

 

LHSP 230

LHSP 230.003

Title: Facts into Fiction

Instructor: Paul Barron

Fiction transports readers into new worlds—realistic or otherwise—largely due to the writer’s imagination. But the imagination needs something to work with: starting points, ideas for characters and situations, details that make the world come alive. This course begins away from the blank page and focuses on the value of research in fiction—research that inspires and research that makes your work all the more “real.” George R. R. Martin provides good example: “Although my story is fantasy, it is strongly grounded in actual Medieval history. The War of the Roses was one of the major influences, which had the Yorks and the Lancasters instead of the Starks and the Lannisters. But I like to mix and match and move things around.”

To generate ideas, early in the semester we’ll explore the variety of archives, art works, and events the University offers. The main work of the semester will be planning and writing a sizable chunk of a novel or short fiction collection. To capitalize on your learning, you’ll also write two essays on the craft of fiction. As a class we’ll read essays and interviews about writing by authors such as Flannery O’Connor, Percival Everett, Andrea Barrett, and Haruki Murakami. You will also customize the course by creating your own reading list and passing on what you’re learning to the rest of the class.

Rather than promoting one genre of fiction, this course encourages you research the genres you wish to write in, so that you know how your work fits and where it diverges. The class aims at helping you to develop research skills you can return to when inspiration runs dry, to be able to examine and discuss the craft of fiction, and to learn to identify and improve a variety of elements in your fiction writing.

 

LHSP 230

LHSP 230.004

Title: The Children's Story: Re-envisioning Children's Literature

Instructor: Carol Tell

The best children's books and films stay with us. They grow and deepen as we ourselves mature. Rather than label and dismiss these pieces of artwork as merely for "children," in this class we will embrace their artistry, sophistication, humanity, complexity, and frequent use of images to heighten our experience of words. We will examine different genres of children's literature: storybooks, fairy tales, children's poetry (from Blake's SONGS OF INNOCENCE to Shel Silverstein), and young adult novels. We will also view a film adaptation. But the emphasis will be on your own creative work. For your culminating project, you will write and illustrate your own children's book.


English 223

English 223.002

Title: Creative Wrting

Instructor: Russell Brakefield

This course will function as an introduction to the strategies for successfully reading and writing poetry and short fiction. Good writing starts with good reading, and this course will focus on developing strategies for close, comprehensive reading in order to advance creative writing skills. You will read and study examples of published poetry and prose in order to better understand the craft of writing in these two genres. This class will rely heavily on the workshop model, which means you will engage in the close study and critique of classmates work as well. The workshop process helps you become proficient in offering critical feedback on poetry and fiction. The workshop process also helps you to hone your own writing skills and establish successful strategies for expanding and revising their work. You will be asked to develop a number of original creative compositions and will be responsible for daily writing assignments and a revised portfolio of writing. An important aspect of this course will be revision and progression throughout the semester based on workshop feedback and individual work with the instructor. This course will challenge participants to read often, write frequently, and participate in class discussions, projects, and experiments. The final goal of this course, along with a better understanding of how to read and write poetry and fiction, is to explore individual creative writing goals and projects.

Fall 2015 Course Archive

LHSP 125

LHSP 125.001

Title: Writing and Performance

Instructor: Carol Tell

This first-year writing course will introduce you to college-level writing through an investigation of artistic performance: music, film, theater, poetry, dance, even sports. Along with viewing, analyzing, and writing arguments about a variety of performances, you will write your own film reviews. You will also attend a live performance of Antigone. Our readings will include a range of texts and will tackle the idea of adaptation--from script to stage, novel to film, music studio to live venue. You will also be asked to think about how writing itself is a “performance.” But most of all, you’ll be figuring out how to write effectively for college—how to parse a writing prompt, what words like “argument” and “revision” really mean, and how to move (quickly) beyond the five-paragraph essay.

Texts may include works from David Foster Wallace, Annie Proux, Seamus Heaney, Louis Menand, Anne Carson, Sophocles, Shakespeare, Sylvia Plath, Edith Wharton, and others. We’ll analyze music (your favorites and mine) and view two films. We’ll blog. We’ll share and revise. And we’ll write lots.  

 

LHSP 125

LHSP 125.002

Title: Writing and Seeing

Instructor: Scott Beal

When William Blake wrote in 1799, “As the Eye is formed such are its Powers,” he noted that vision is not objective; what we see is shaped by who we are and what we believe. Almost 200 years later, Alice Fulton ended her poem “Cascade Experiment” with the lines, “…let my glance be passional / toward the universe and you.” Here Fulton calls for vision as an active approach to the world, a form of attention that clarifies truths and embraces hidden possibilities. In this course we will explore through writing how our ways of seeing ourselves and each other, our natures and cultures, are shaped by artists, writers, and producers. And we will use writing to activate our ways of seeing – to let our glances be more passional, to see our subjects more sharply and more deeply. Writing is often (as John Berger has pointed out) “an attempt to explain how, either metaphorically or literally, ‘you see things.’” Our course will engage with all aspects of the writing process, from brainstorming and research to collaboration and revision, to communicate our ways of seeing most effectively to audiences.

 

LHSP 125

LHSP 125.003

Title: What You See is What You Get: Exploring Image and Identity

Instructor: T. Hetzel

How do images illuminate or disguise a truth--or build an argument?

As we ask these questions and more, our class will first investigate and analyze the changing image and identity of Detroit, before turning the focus on our selves and our own experiences of image and identity. 

We will explore the work of American photographers, writers and artists including Sally Mann, Diane Arbus, David Turnley, Tyree Guyton, Charlie LeDuff and Cindy Sherman.  We will watch and deconstruct films that may include Detropia, American Revolutionary: The Evolution of Grace Lee Boggs, and Banksy’s Exit Through The Gift Shop. Students will take their own original photos and produce new prose – analytical, reflective and imaginative--as we explore academic argument and the interplay of text and image. As a class we will take our notebooks and cameras on a trip in September to Detroit, and later in the term, we will visit the University of Michigan Museum of Art (UMMA) to see photographs from the collection together. We’ll draft and revise essays as we examine the power and potential of visual rhetoric while working toward a final project of each student’s own design that could take the shape of a photo essay to a short film. 

Is what you see what you get?  What will you discover and reveal about the world as you see it?  

 

LHSP 125

LHSP 125.004

Title: HardTelling, Not Knowing

Instructor: Louis Cicciarelli

This first-year writing course considers not-knowing as part of the journey and process of growing as a college reader and writer. We’ll read texts about people and places we don’t know, in stories where the narrators engage their own not-knowing, and we’ll write using the process of dealing with not-knowing to discover more than we know. Our readings will include short stories, essays, and novels such as Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s Purple Hibiscus and Karen Joy Fowler’s We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves, and we’ll view films including Sarah Polley’s documentary Stories We Tell. You’ll write three academic essays, one piece of fiction, and contribute regular responses to a course blog.  This class will emphasize rewriting as a necessary practice in the development of good college-level writing; we will cultivate revision strategies, using both peer and whole-class workshops, to produce our best work. Through this course, students will develop as critical readers, thinkers, and writers able to communicate in an academic community. Ultimately, this class will improve your ability to write clear, organized, and cohesive essays -- and improve your skills as both interpreters and communicators of ideas and information. 

 

LHSP 125

LHSP 125.005

Title: Being Human in the Digital Age

Instructor: Lori Randall

We have long struggled with the question of what it means to be human, and this question has become increasingly more complex in 21st-century capitalist societies.  Rising levels of technological innovation and material consumption not only blur traditional boundaries between the natural environment and the created environment but also force humans to reconsider our relationship with the natural world and its resources. This course offers an opportunity to engage deeply with the question of what it means to be human in an increasingly man-made, consumption-driven world. Through readings, movies, music, discussion, and writing, course participants will explore the following components of what it means to be human in the digital age:  technology and self image; technology and human-human relationships; and technology and human-nature relationships.  The course will culminate in a project that allows each participant to develop – and defend - his or her own personal philosophy on the role of technology in society; the continued use of public funds for technology research and development; and the complex relationships between technology, sustainability, and social justice. Central texts for the course will likely include some or all of the following: Friedrich Dürrenmatt’s tragicomedy The Physicists, Philip K. Dick’s Sci-Fi classic Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, and David Suzuki’s The Sacred Balance, a thought-provoking reflection on modern science, technology, the environment, and humanity offered from the perspective of a geneticist. Additional readings or films will be drawn from the fields of science fiction, science fact, philosophy, literature, theology, economics, sociology, and political science. 

“A human being is a part of the whole called by us universe,

a part limited in time and space.  He experiences himself,

his thoughts and feeling as something separated from the rest,

a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness.

This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to

our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest to us.

Our task must be to free ourselves from this prison

by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures

and the whole of nature in its beauty.”

~ Albert Einstein

 

LHSP 125

LHSP 125.005

Title: Writing Spaces

Instructor: Paul Barron

It’s clear how sculpture, architecture, and dance make use of space, but writing also uses space to create meaning via process and content, as well as form. Think of the way books are laid out, the setting of a story, a brainstorming map, that the spaces in the letters of this font were carefully designed. The language we use for writing reflects this: we “read between the lines”; a stanza is a “little room”; the word “verse” originated because the process of writing lines on a page resembles the plowing of a field.

This first year writing course invites you to imagine and create original arguments, narratives, and reflections on the ways that writing and space interact: what the latent meanings of fictional spaces signify, how particular experiences of space affect us, and what uses of space reveal about social justice. As well as encouraging your creativity, this course will prepare you by breaking down the skills essential to college level writing and thinking. We’ll draw from film, fiction, essays, philosophy, and creative nonfiction by authors such as Eudora Welty, Edward Soja, Gretel Ehrlich, George Saunders, and Annie Dillard. Books will include: Giovanni’s Room, by James Baldwin; In the Heart of the Heart of the Country, by William Gass; and A Field Guide to Getting Lost, by Rebecca Solnit.

 

LHSP 125

LHSP 125.007

Title: Sentimental Reasons

Instructor: Ray McDaniel

This section of LHSP 125 introduces students to the standards and rigors of academic prose and presentation by inviting them to consider questions of sentiment and emotion in how we tell stories about ourselves and conduct arguments with each other. Students will assemble a final portfolio of work that will reflect revised prose in narrative and analytical modes. Feelings encouraged, but not required.

 

LHSP 230

LHSP 230.001

Title: Editing and Publishing

Instructor: Alexander Weinstein

In this class you will learn the necessary techniques to critically discuss poetry, fiction, non-fiction, art, and music in order to become successful editors. We will examine a wide variety of leading national and international literary magazines and small press journals, focusing our attention on the creative work of contemporary writers. Much of this class will focus on gaining experience in literary editing and publishing in order to produce your own literary and art journals and online magazines. During the semester the class will take field trips to the Duederstadt Center, Hatcher Library, and Hollanders to become familiarized with the resources available to you on campus and in the community. You will learn to use Adobe Creative Suite programs (including Photoshop and InDesign) as well as audio editing tools (Quick Time and Garage Band) in order to gain the experience and confidence needed to produce your own journals. These workshops will lead to you creating your own posters (to advertise the LHSP Arts and Literary Journal), your own artistic/literary websites, and your own print journal.  The class culminates with you designing and publishing you own printed literary journals.

 

LHSP 230

LHSP 230.002

Title: Creative Communities

Instructor: Mark Tucker

From visiting artists and writers to world-renowned productions sponsored by UMS, the U-M campus has a thriving arts culture, with unique opportunities for students to engage with cutting-edge works and the artists who make them. Students in this course will attend readings, artist talks, performances, and other arts-related events, and will engage in dynamic group discussions, critical writing assignments, and creative expression projects. Simultaneously, student leaders in this class will help initiate and produce a brand new public art project/event/performance to be unveiled in the Ann Arbor community in 2015/2016. Through inventive planning, organization, logistics and implementation students will have the opportunity to work together as a team to experience first-hand what it takes to create their own large-scale arts event while becoming a part of the vibrant creative arts community in Ann Arbor.This course is limited to student leaders in the Lloyd Hall Scholars Program.

 

Writing 201

Writing 201.003

Title: Audio Essay

Instructor: Carol Tell

In this course on the audio essay, students will learn how to compose and publish their own podcasts, using a mixture of narration, interviews, sound effects, and music. Students will begin by developing several short sound-based narratives (“audio postcards”), focusing on such elements as voice, non-verbal sound, and interviews. Using the creative nonfiction genre as a model, students will then write an original audio essay, which they will record and workshop with their peers. In doing so they will examine what role sound plays in the development of voice and point of view, and what particular limitations and opportunities are afforded by writing in this medium. By listening to a variety of audio essays and shorter audio pieces, students will also learn effective techniques for pacing, audio layering, and balancing anecdote with reflection.