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EIHS Symposium: The Past and Futures of Anthropology and History

(Series: Celebrating 30 Years of the Doctoral Program in Anthropology and History)
Friday, October 12, 2018
12:00-2:00 PM
1014 Tisch Hall Map
As part of a semester-long celebration of the thirtieth year of the Doctoral Program in Anthropology and History, this panel brings together alumni and current students to reflect on the purchase and promise of our program at a time when established regimes of authority, knowledge, and expression are being called into question by groups spanning the political spectrum. A discussion that focuses on Anthro-History as an institutional, as much as intellectual, project seems especially opportune, and speakers will put their research and experience with the Anthro-History program in conversation with larger debates about disciplinarity, the university, privilege and power in academia, and the place of specialized knowledge in the public sphere.

Panelists:

Jamie Andreson, PhD Candidate in Anthropology and History, University of Michigan
Luciana Aenășoaie, Assistant Director, Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program, University of Michigan (PhD, Anthropology and History, University of Michigan)
Natalie Rothman, Associate Professor, History, University of Toronto Scarborough (PhD, Anthropology and History, University of Michigan)
Reuben Riggs-Bookman (chair), PhD Student in Anthropology and History, University of Michigan

Free and open to the public. Lunch provided.

Part of the semester-long series celebrating 30 years of the Doctoral Program in Anthropology and History.

This event is part of the Friday Series of the Eisenberg Institute for Historical Studies. It is made possible by a generous contribution from Kenneth and Frances Aftel Eisenberg. Additional support from the Doctoral Program in Anthropology and History.
Building: Tisch Hall
Event Type: Conference / Symposium
Tags: Anthropology, History
Source: Happening @ Michigan from Eisenberg Institute for Historical Studies, Department of History