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FTVM Honors Program Cohorts

Meet the 2019-20 Honors Cohort

Seth Andrews 

Primary Advisor, Terri Sarris; Secondary Advisor, Sheila Murphy

Seth Andrews was born in Elkhart, Indiana and raised in Edwardsburg, Michigan. He's loved television since Blues Clues and comedy since his mom told him it wasn't funny to shoot pasta out of his nose. In high school, he formed the improv troupe Bohemian Grandma, and at University of Michigan he wrote and directed sketches in FTVM 403's sketch comedy production Pls Hire Us. He produced several shorts with M-Agination Films until being elected president of the club. He has worked as a literary intern for Detroit Public Theatre and as a development intern for Spacestation Media in Brooklyn, NY. Through his minor in digital studies, Seth has developed a strong appreciation of all media from folktales to video games.

His honors thesis Drop Outs is TV comedy pilot exploring urban flight from the Rust Belt through two queer college drop outs trying to hack it as performance artists in their economically struggling hometown. The show seeks to blend aesthetics from prestige dramas and buddy sitcoms in order to examine the highs and lows of life as an outsider in the place you've always been.

Ian Harris 

Primary Advisor, Oliver Thornton; Secondary Advisor, Yeidy Rivero

Ian Harris is an Ann Arbor native who never seriously considered going to school anywhere but the University of Michigan. Since stumbling across the family camcorder in 2007, he’s loved movies and making people laugh. Long fascinated by sketch comedy, Ian was a part of last fall’s FTVM 403 Sketch Comedy production Pls Hire Us and spent two years producing a student sketch comedy show in high school. Ian is a producer for M-agination Films, where he has written/directed multiple comedic shorts. He’s worked as an intern at Rain Management Group in LA and as a camp counselor and media coordinator at Camp Fitch YMCA. When not working on film related projects, he writes a bi-weekly entertainment column for The Michigan Daily, competes on the Michigan Mock Trial Team and is generally considered an above average Settlers of Catan player.

 

His honors project Diag Disruptions is a digital sketch comedy show based on and inspired by campus life at the University of Michigan. The show aims to create a dialogue around the eccentricities and peculiarities that come with being at a school that sees itself as both the Harvard of the Midwest and the Alabama football of the North.

Matthew Henning 

Primary Advisor, Caryl Flinn; Secondary Advisor, Sarah Murray

Matt Henning is a Michigan native and alumni of Pinckney Community Schools near Ann Arbor. His favorite color is green. He has a passionate disdain for lawns, and a passionate love for houseplants. Currently he is a candidate for honors in the FTVM department at the University of Michigan, with a minor through the School of Social Work. Though, his academic work is primarily focused on digital media and film theory (lots of writing), he has spent some time in Detroit working with Three Lyons Creative and making short-form media such as some of the campaign materials for Rashida Tlaib's winning 2018 midterm campaign, as well as a lot of time in Ann Arbor making media, working, living, loving, and thriving on Jolly Pumpkin truffle fries, and Venti cold brews (with light ice).

His honors project is a written thesis exploring taste politics, filmic pleasure, and changing media contexts in the digital age surrounding the term/genre/aesthetic of "camp". He will be studying the implications of camp’s evolutionary trajectory and how that trajectory has been altered, modified, or enhanced by the influence of digital media on our global culture. For example: How is a taste for camp woven into our opportunities to engage with media in the digital age? How does that engagement rely on historical understandings of camp and taste culture in our lives, and how does camp provide an alternative method of engagement in comparison to dominant taste and ideology systems?

Caroline Randolph 

Primary Advisor, Matthew Solomon; Secondary Advisor, Stephen Ward (the RC/DAAS)

Caroline Randolph  is an Ann Arbor native and came to the University of Michigan as a transfer student from Kenyon College in 2017. She is a Film,Television and Media and German double-major, and studied film in German at the Universität Tübingen on a study abroad program in Spring of 2019. Besides focusing on academics, Caroline is a sister in the Omicron chapter of Alpha Omicron Pi and a member of the Institute of the Humanities on campus. Originally planning on pursuing a career in acting, Caroline fell in love with the art and theory of filmmaking and now spends her time behind a camera or in front of her Adler typewriter.

Her academic thesis focuses on the cultural intersection of Hong Kong kung-fu cinema and American hip-hop as exemplified by the Wu-Tang Clan’s artistic, linguistic, and moral practices. Known as one of, if not the best rap group in the history of hip-hop, the Wu-Tang Clan utilized dialogue, character names, and thematic tropes from these films to translate their own story to contemporary hip-hop audiences.