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Spring & Summer 2020 Online Course Offerings

The Department of Economics will be offering courses online for the Spring and Summer 2020 semesters. 

Please see below for our course offerings!

Spring 2020 Online Courses

Spring 2020 Online Courses:

ECON 101.101 - Principles of Economics I

Instructor: Ronald Caldwell

Credits: 4

Requirements & Distribution: SS, QR2

This course introduces microeconomic concepts and analysis, supply and demand analysis, theories of the firm and individual behavior, competition and monopoly, and imperfect competition. Throughout the semester, the course will stress applications of elementary economic theory to real world issues and problems. Topics that we will investigate include the basic supply and demand model, price controls, taxes, trade, pollution, and monopolies.

Students will be evaluated based on exams and graded weekly quizzes.

ECON 102.101 - Principles of Economics II

Instructor: Adam Stevenson

Credits: 3

Requirements & Distribution: SS, QR2

Macroeconomics is the study of economic behavior in aggregate. We will examine how national wealth and well-being are determined, and we'll ask what (if anything) we can do to guide and adjust our aggregate economic fate. Along the way, we will consider theories of production, unemployment, inflation, long-run growth, investment and savings, business cycles (the "boom and bust cycle"), money, and international trade. The course strives to give students a broad perspective in terms of the intellectual history of big-picture economic debates, as well as a data-driven discussion of the current state of the economy.

Grades are based on three non-cumulative exams, weekly homework assignments, daily classroom i>Clicker participation, and three short newspaper article analyses.

ECON 251.101 - Introduction to Statistics and Econometrics II

Instructor: Asenka Asenova

Credits: 4

Requirements & Distribution: BS, QR1

Enforced Prerequisites: With a minimum grade of C, MATH 115, 116, 121, 156, 185, 186, 215, 255, 256, 285, 295, or 296; AND with a minimum grade of C-, either ECON 249, STATS 250, STATS 280, ECON 451, IOE 265, STATS 412, or STATS 426.

This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of econometric analysis. To this end, the primary focus is on simple and multiple linear regressions under the classical assumptions. Extensions include testing hypotheses for single and multiple linear restrictions; regression with binary variables, basic regression with time series data, and other deviations from the classical assumptions. More advanced topics can include instrumental variable estimation,the difference-in-differences estimator, and basic panel data analysis. The course will put a heavy emphasis on empirical applications; econometric theory will be discussed where necessary but will not be the central focus.

Students with a strong mathematical background seeking a more advanced treatment of the material may wish to consider ECON 452 instead. The knowledge attained in the course will be valuable for students who consider a career in economics, business, marketing, finance, and other related fields.

ECON 259.101 - Excel in Economics and Business Analytics

Instructor: Dongni Wan

Credits: 3

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 101 and ECON 102 with a C or better.

This course seeks to develop career-ready proficiency with Microsoft Excel by applying knowledge of Principles of Microeconomics to the real-world decision problems in economics, finance and management. Upon completion of the course, students are expected to have developed practical skills with Excel features most often used in the workplace to solve problems in consulting, banking, education, and insurance industries. Examples of topics covered include estimating a demand curve, pricing products by using subjectively determined demand, calculating customer value, evaluating investments by using net present value, and sensitivity analysis. 

In spring 2020, this class will be offered remotely. The class sessions will be organized with a combination of recorded videos and live session activities (Zoom live sessions). All weekly quizzes and exams are expected to be completed on Canvas. In addition to the scheduled class sessions, students will have the opportunities to interact with the instructor during online office hours and other scheduled appointments on Zoom. 

Student evaluation will be based on online weekly quizzes, midterm exam, final exam, and case studies.

ECON 310.101 - Money and Banking

Instructor: Maciej Dudek

Credits: 3

Requirements & Distribution: SS

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 102 with a C or better.

Our focus in this class will be primarily on the structure, organization, and functioning of financial markets in facilitating inter-temporal trade, and the role money plays in both intra- and inter- temporal trade. Millions of participants in financial markets daily seek to borrow (trading future consumption for current consumption) and lend (trading current consumption for future consumption), and do so primarily through a host of financial intermediaries (including banks), which reduce the transactions costs of doing so. As we trade into an uncertain future, there is attendant risk and uncertainty that must be confronted by parties on all sides of such trades, and this affects not only the characteristics of the instruments being traded but also the way roles of financial intermediaries have evolved through time.

We will also consider the potential strengths and weaknesses of monetary policy, which impacts financial markets first before we experience spillover effects in the real sectors of our economy: production and sale of goods and services, accumulation of capital and economic growth, and employment, etc.

ECON 320.101 - Survey of Labor Economics

Instructor: Ronald Caldwell

Credits: 3

Requirements & Distribution: SS

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 101 with a C or better, or ECON 401 with a C- or better.

This is an introductory course in Labor Economics. Topics include an analysis of unemployment, human capital investment, welfare policy and Unions. (Topics covered more intensively in ECON 421 and 422)

There will be two non-cumulative exams.

ECON 380.101 - Public Finance

Instructor:  Adam Stevenson

Credits: 3

Requirements & Distribution: SS

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 101 with a C or better, or ECON 401 with a C- or better.

Public Finance is the study of governmental action and interaction within the economy. This includes understanding why and when the government can and ought to intervene in markets. We will study the major types of spending, transferring, and taxing done by the government, mostly in a US context. We study a framework that allows us to investigate a number of the most pressing public-policy issues of the day, including health care reform, education reform, “welfare” programs, redistributive taxation, and environmental regulation.

ECON 396.101 - Financial Markets and the Macro Economy

Instructor: Edward Cho

Credits: 3

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 102 with a C or better, or ECON 402 with a C- or better.

This course examines financial markets and institutions, and their broader role in the economy. There are two main objectives for this course. The first objective is to introduce students to the economic principles embedded in financial markets so that they may be able to more generally apply these concepts to other financial vehicles they may encounter. The second objective is to help students read the financial news by defining and understanding the role of various financial instruments. Some of the topics we will cover are stock and bond markets, money markets, derivatives, and monetary policy.

ECON 401.101 - Intermediate Microeconomic Theory

Instructor: Benjamin Zamzow

Credits: 4

Requirements & Distribution: BS, QR1

Enforced Prerequisites: MATH 115, 116, 121, 156, 176, 185, 186, 215, 285, 295, or 296; with a grade of C or better.

For the Spring 2020 term, Econ 401 will be administered online via Canvas and supported by internet video technologies. I view Intermediate Microeconomics as an extension of your basic introduction to economics. The purpose is to add a layer of mathematical formalism to the foundation of concepts taught in a principles level course. This means that the course is very technical with an emphasis on theory. We will begin with an examination of the underlying structure and models of consumer behavior. We will then move on to producer theory. In the third phase of the course we use our models to analyze a series of market structures. General topics include optimization, demand, costs, pricing strategies, market equilibrium, market structure, and strategic behavior.

Exams will be administered online via Canvas. There will be two midterm exams and a final exam. There will also be nearly weekly quizzes. All assessments will be completed using Canvas. 

ECON 402.101 - Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory

Instructor: Maciej Dudek

Credits: 4

Requirements & Distribution: BS, QR1

Enforced Prerequisites: MATH 115, 116, 121, 156, 176, 185, 186, 215, 285, 295, or 296, (completed with a minimum grade of C or better).

The course offers a modern treatment of the principal macroeconomic issues - long run economic growth and short run economic fluctuations at the intermediate level. The course allows students to become familiar with canonical models and gain insights and understanding of the key macroeconomic phenomena. In addition, students will develop understanding of key policy issues and will learn how to select proper policy tools. The goal of the course is to expose students to formal and more rigorous macroeconomic reasoning and make them ready to engage in a more informed macroeconomic discourse. All topics will be cast in a formal, but well-motivated and intuitive, modeling framework with emphasis on rigor and logic.

ECON 490.101 - The Economics of Entrepreneurship

Instructor: Benjamin Zamzow

Credits: 3

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 401 (completed with a minimum grade of C- or better), OR Graudate standing.

Administered online via Canvas and supported by internet video technology, this course applies insights from economic theory to the practice of starting a new business or expanding a current business. The course combines elements of strategy, marketing, and entrepreneurial finance courses as typically taught in a business school and an industrial organization class as taught in an economics department. We start by examining general issues regarding entrepreneurship, in particular the search for markets that can support entrepreneurial profits. The next section turns to specific strategic decisions that entrepreneurs make: pricing, advertising, product location, deterring entry by competitors, etc. The last section examines practical issues in entrepreneurship, e.g. finding capital, business plans, patent protection, negotiation, employee compensation, and auctions as a transactional mechanism.

There will be two exams administered online via Canvas and two problem sets submitted via Canvas. There will be a group project (presentation and paper). The group presentation will be conducted using Zoom videoconferencing. 

Summer 2020 Online Courses

Summer 2020 Online Courses:

ECON 101.201 - Principles of Economics I

Instructor: Mitchell Dudley

Credits: 3

Requirements & Distribution: SS, QR2

This is an introductory economics course. In this course you will learn how the choices you make drive our economy as well as our daily lives. Topics will include:

-Why choice is necessary;

-How consumers and firms make choices;

-How and why the government affects these choices;

-Why individuals interact;

-How an individual market works;

-Where the market may go awry.

Examples of specific topics are trade, pollution, taxes, competition and monopolies. The hope is that by the end of this term, you will be able to see how economics is involved in everything around you.

There will be three non-cumulative exams offered online. These exams will be timed, but open note and open book. Additionally, there will be three writing assignments in which students will compose a first draft, review their peers, and then complete a revision or reflection (three submissions per writing assignment). All nine submissions will be done electronically through Canvas.

ECON 102.201 - Principles of Economics II

Instructor: Ardina Hasanbasri

Credits: 3

Requirements & Distribution: SS, QR2

This is an introductory course focusing on the aggregate economy. Throughout this course, we will explore how economies work and how we might influence them. Topics include the various measures of aggregate economic well-being (national income, output, unemployment, money, and inflation); the growth, expansions, and recessions of economies; the models used to describe how an economy works; and the monetary and fiscal policy instruments used to adjust the economy.

This is an online course with a combination of pre-recorded lectures that students can watch on their own time and mandatory live zoom sessions.

Course evaluation is done through three non-cumulative exams, homework assignments, and group assignments. The summer session is twice as fast as a regular term. Quizzes are embedded within lecture recordings and deadlines are sometimes tight to ensure everyone is keeping up with the material. There are no discussion sections for this course.

ECON 370.201 - Environmental and Resource Economics

Instructor: Mitchell Dudley

Credits: 3

Requirements & Distribution: SS

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 101.

Cross-Listed Classes: ENVIRON 375 - Environ&Res Econ, Section 201

This course focuses on the contribution economics has made in understanding and managing environmental and natural resource problems. The course will analyze the sources of environmental and natural resource problems using economic tools. Given this knowledge students will learn how these economic tools, through market based incentives, may resolve these problems. Finally, We'll take a look at real policies and discuss the problems of transitioning policies from theory into the practical realm.

Presented online, lectures will be prerecorded and uploaded for students to view. Regular video conference sessions will provide a space for questions and discussion in place of live lectures. There will be three non-cumulative exams offered online. These exams will be timed, but open note and open book.

ECON 402.201 - Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory

Instructor: Edward Cho

Credits: 4

Requirements & Distribution: BS, QR1

Enforced Prerequisites: MATH 115, 116, 121, 156, 176, 185, 186, 215, 285, 295, or 296, (completed with a minimum grade of C or better).

This course in macroeconomics deals with the determination of broad economic aggregates such as national income, employment, the price level, and the balance of payments in both the short run and the long run. Rigorous analysis is used to understand the forces that determine these economic variables, and how they are affected by public policies.

ECON 441.201 - International Trade Theory

Instructor: Giuseppe De Arcangelis

Credits: 3

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 401 with a grade of at least C-; or Graduate standing.

This course is an introduction to international trade covering both theoretical models and current policy issues. The main goal is to understand the drivers of economic relations across borders, the gains from international trade and their distribution within and among countries. These topics are explored with models based on perfect competition and under different forms of imperfect competition. Globalization is presented as a phenomenon related to the increased international mobility of firms and workers with consequences on production efficiency but also on welfare distribution. Governments intervene in international trade with different policy instruments, like tariffs and quotas, and the course analyzes their effects within and among countries. During class many references will be given to current issues (US trade policy with China, India and Europe; Brexit; the role of international organizations; the economic effects of pandemic COVID-19 to international trade).

Theories and tools developed in Econ 401 will be used. Only a brief review of microeconomics is given at the beginning of class when introducing the first models. Some statistical knowledge would be helpful, but it is not required.

Students will be evaluated by midterm and final exams, and problem sets.

ECON 485.201 - Law and Economics

Instructor: Edward Cho

Credits: 3

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 401 with a grade of at least C-; or Graduate standing.

This course examines important legal issues using economic analysis. Topics include property rights, torts, contracts, and crime. We will explore how the structure of the law can induce efficient incentives in each of these areas. Furthermore, we will also study the relative benefits and costs of market (cap-and-trade) and nonmarket (command-and-control) schemes of regulating the environment. Finally, this course studies financial regulation in the wake of the U.S. financial crisis.