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William Haber Fellowship

William Haber Graduate Fellowships are a core component of MITRE and a critical resource for our doctoral program. Named in honor of William Haber, a former chair of the Economics Department and dean of the College of Literature, Sciences and the Arts, a towering figure in Michigan political and economic history and a major influence in national economic policymaking, these fellowships make it possible for the Department to be highly competitive in recruiting top doctoral students to the University of Michigan.

Upper Year Fellowship:

Yishu Zeng

Yishu Zeng is a fifth-year Ph.D. student in the Department of Economics, whose primary research interests are microeconomic theory and corporate finance, with a particular emphasis on information economics. Before joining the University of Michigan, she obtained her Ph.D. degree in mathematics from the National University of Singapore. She has been working on developing new methodologies for economic models that could facilitate that understandings of how strategic informaiton transmission afftects agents' internations in a complex environment. Her current works are mostly on information design, persuasion, and principal-agent problems

First Year Recipients:

Bei (Nicole) Luo

Bei was born in Yibin, China. She received a B.S. with majors in applied mathematics and economics from Emory University and an M.A. in social sciences with a concentration in economics from the University of Chicago. After graduation, she worked as a research assistant at Chicago Booth for two years focusing on topics in applied microeconomics. Her current research interests lies in the fields of industrial organization and public finance.

Lonjezo Sithole

Lonjezo Sithole is an incomingi Ph.D. student in the Department of Economics. A Malawian, Lonjezo received a Bachelor of Social Science degree majoring in Economics in 2012 and an M.A. in Economics in 2018 from the University of Malawi. He also obtained an M.Sc. in Economics (Econometrics) from the University of Edinburgh in the UK in 2019. Prior to joining the Ph.D. program, he was working for the World Bank as a consultant. 

His research interests span econometric theory and applied econometrics, and they are largely motivated by methodological issues in labor economics and development economics as well as data constraints in developing countries. Currently, he is interested in causal inference in settings without the stable unit treatment value assumption and recovering causal effects from noisy measurements. 

Hee Sung Kim

Hee Sung Kim is an aspiring economist in the making. He graduated from the University of Michigan with a Bachelors of Science in Economics and Mathematics in 2016. Upon graduation, he worked as a Research Associate at the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis. His current research interests includ international migration of students from developing countries to developed countries and how such temporary migration afftects the economy of the sending countries.