Skip to Content

Search: {{$root.lsaSearchQuery.q}}, Page {{$root.page}}

Course Video Highlights

AAS 103.002 - First Year Social Science Seminar | Reconsidering African Environments

This course seeks to introduce students to everyday life in urban Africa. The course is designed to equip students with basic and useful knowledge about the how urban residents – rich and poor, newcomers and old-timers, young and old, men and women – negotiate the challenges of living in cities.

AAS 104.003 - First Year Humanities Seminar | African American History in Slavery and Freedom

with Jon Wells

This class explores the fascinating shift in Black history from slavery to freedom in the 1800s. Through the reading of memoirs, novels, and other books, we will explain Black experience under enslavement, the Civil War, emancipation, and the civil rights struggles of the late 19th century.

AAS 126.001 Elementry African Languages II | Yoruba

with Gabriel Olujide Ayoola

This course number is intended for students who wish to develop their ability to speak, read and write and understand a sub-Saharan African language. Instruction is offered through a distance-learning, course share program at Indiana University.

AAS 226.001 - Intermediate African Languages II | Yoruba

with Gabriel Olujide Ayoola

This intermediate level course sequence is designed for students who have successfully completed the Elementary sequence, or with the permission of the instructor. Instruction is offered through a distance-learning, course share program at Indiana University. It broadens speaking, reading and writing skills as students engage in discussions and writing on more complex topics.

AAS 202 - Introduction to African Diasporic Studies, Global Blackness

Is the African Diaspora a concept or an actual geographical location? Is it singular or are there multiple African diasporas? What does diaspora have to do with the multi-lingual, multicultural continent of over fifty countries that make up Africa? What impact has Africa and its diaspora(s) had on the so-called “white” West and its development as a site of tremendous wealth and privilege? AAS 202 engages these questions by exploring the long historical, economic, and political relationships between "the West" (e.g., United States, Britain, France, and Germany) and selected countries in Africa and the diaspora (e.g., Jamaica, Haiti, Brazil, Mali, Liberia, Ethiopia, Democratic Republic of Congo, and South Africa). Topics include: pre-colonial African empires; the Middle Passage; child soldiers; public health; conflict minerals; slavery and resistance; migration; empire, colonialism, and post-colonialism; twentieth-century freedom movements; religion; and popular forms of cultural expression.

AAS 201.001 -  Introduction to Afro-American Studies

with Naomi AndreWhat do Kendrick Lamar, Ida B. Wells, Marcus Garvey, James Baldwin, and Toni Morrison have in common? Each of these figures are thought leaders about the condition of Black life in the United States of America. What can we learn from understanding the lives, experiences, and histories of Black Americans from enslavement to the present?

Honors 230.010 - Violent Environments: Oil, Development, and the Discourse of Power

with Omolade Adunbi

This course examines violence and its relationship to oil as a non-renewable natural resource. The course will focus on the close examination and comparison of discourses and practices concerned with resource extraction, resource distribution, energy security, and ‘modernity’ in the United States, North America, Africa, Europe, the Middle East and Latin America. Emphasis will be on case studies on oil as a non-renewable natural resource and how its extraction has contributed to reshaping livelihoods, energy security and creating spaces of violence as well as the possibilities for ‘development’. 

AAS 232.001 -  Survey of African American Cinema

with Scott Poulson-Bryant

Using Hollywood films as the primary texts, this course will engage how race and racialized performance were portrayed in 1970s. Looking at various genres of film, the course will introduce students to many of the debates surrounding the aesthetic, political, and social climate of the US in the 1970s which were marked by the increasing influence of identity politics, the Ethnic Revival, and black power. 

AAS 394.001 - Lawless/Formation/Freedom: Writing About Race, Gender & Popular Culture

with Scott Poulson-Bryant

This is a creative non-fiction writing workshop in which we will think about creative nonfiction writing as cultural reportage. We will read a survey of cultural reportage—primarily personal essays, reviews, and opinion pieces—for textual, cultural, and aesthetic analysis to think about the ways that race, gender and sexuality intersect and operate thematically and politically in that writing. 

AAS 248.001 - Crime, Race, and the Law

with Scott Ellsworth

This course will focus on the historical origins and ongoing impact of the racial crisis in the present-day American criminal justice system and its momentous public policy implications for U.S. society in the 21st century.

AAS 262.001 - 20th Century African-American Social Movements

with Matthew Countryman

This course traces the history of the Civil Rights Movement in the United States from World War II through the 1960’s and towards the present day. What strategies have activists pursued to press for racial equality? How have activists working for racial justice organized their efforts in the past and present? The course incorporates community-based learning techniques to expand students’ understanding of social movement organizing approaches, possibilities and challenges over time. Students will work in small groups to conduct research projects based on oral history interviews with movement activists from the local area and beyond.

AAS 290.001 - The Tulsa Race Massacre
AAS 290.003 - The Tulsa Race Massacre

with Scott Ellsworth

The mini-course seminars will introduce students to a range of issues and experiences related to the topics and identity categories of specialized topics in Afroamerican, African, and/or Caribbean studies. The courses will explore and analyze major aspects of the subject matter:historical contexts for the interactions of African and the diaspora;personal experiences; andmeanings and effects.

AAS 290.002 - The Trickster Figure in West African Literature
AAS 290.004 - The Trickster Figure in West African Literature

with Adwoa Atta Opoku-Agyemang

How does a spider trounce a lion? And why do so many African princes send emails promising immense wealth while showcasing such poor financial skills? During this course, we will examine the evolution of the trickster figure from folk literature to modern texts. Tricksters are found in different literary traditions, from ancient religious writings to modern detective fiction. They are as diverse as Kweku Ananse, Brer Rabbit, or Odysseus. While certain texts, particularly those from monotheistic cultures, tend to be wary of the trickster’s untrustworthiness, others regularly embrace his subversiveness. 

AAS 317.001 - Threads: What Does Clothing Have to Do with Race, Culture, Politics, and the Environment?

with Megan Sweeney

You get dressed every day, but how often do you consider the many ways in which clothing shapes our ideas about race, culture, politics, and environment? This course is your chance to explore questions such as: Why is clothing in the news every week, as with the white suit that Kamala Harris wore in acknowledging her election as Vice-President? Throughout history, why have laws been passed to regulate who can wear particular kinds of fabrics and clothes?  How have these clothing laws reflected prevailing ideas about race, gender, class, embodiment, religion, and nationality? and many more!

AAS 358.001  - Africanist Dance Traditions: From Minstrelsy to Hip Hop

with Robin Wilson

Selected topics in Black World Studies which focus on introduction to Africa, to the Caribbean, to North America, and to South America. Specific focus is determined by instructor and indicated in the current Schedule of Classes.

AAS 358.007 - Hip Hop Africa

with Kwasi Ampene

The seminar will offer students an ethnomusicological perspectives on performing arts and power in Sub-Saharan Africa. We shall investigate musical performances as modes of resistance, a means for negotiating power, establishing social identity, providing agency and empowerment, and as a means for constructing gender spaces.

AAS 358.009 - Institutions, Development, and the Environment in Africa

with Brian Klein

Selected topics in Black World Studies which focus on introduction to Africa, to the Caribbean, to North America, and to South America. Specific focus is determined by instructor and indicated in the current Schedule of Classes.

AAS 458.012 - Health and African Development

with Howard Stein

A generally comparative study of the nature, evolution, and implications of the Black experience in Africa, North America, the Caribbean and Latin America. Specific focus is determined by instructor and indicated in the current Schedule of Classes.

AAS 460.001 - Africa and Post-war Development Theory and Policy

with Howard Stein

Sub-Saharan Africa has adopted a variety of different policy strategies in the post-war period from economic planning through the more recent focus on poverty reduction, improvement of governance and enhancing the climate for doing business. The focus of this course is to explore the role of ideology, power and theory in the generation of these different strategies. A key element will be to present the major ideas of the alternative schools of thought or paradigms in the field of development economics in the post-war period and assess their impact on policy in Africa. For this purpose, we will critically evaluate many of the seminal works written in each of these schools aimed at understanding the reasons for their success and failure in SSA while searching for alternative policies that can still address the extant development challenges of the continent.

AAS 482.001 - Black Queer Studies

with Lydia Kelow-Bennett

While Black Queer Studies is a relatively young field in academia, Black queer brilliance has a much longer history. In this course, we will examine key genealogies, debates, and questions emerging from the intersections of blackness, gender, sexuality, and class in the U.S. and other sites in the African diaspora. This course will cross both disciplinary and methodological boundaries as we examine histories of Black queer and queer of color social movements; literature that reflects Black LGBTQ experiences; Black queer performances; and the numerous interventions that Black queer theories have made into questions of family, belonging, citizenship, futures, and performance. Students registering for this class should have some background in Black or African American/Diasporic studies, preferably at least one course in AAS; or, at least one course in gender and sexuality studies with special attention to race and intersectionality. Graduate students are welcome with instructor permission.

AAS 498.001 - DAAS In Action | The History and Future of Black Studies

with Stephen Ward

DAAS-In-Action gives students opportunities to collaborate on a class project that requires each student to apply the knowledge and skills they've gained in DAAS courses. This 3-credit capstone course would underscore the utility of majoring or minoring in DAAS; it would help students to recognize the concrete skills they have developed and might use to effect change in the world.

AAS 498.002 - DAAS in Action | - Prisoner Rights and the Conditions of Confinement Project

with Heather Thompson

DAAS-In-Action gives students opportunities to collaborate on a class project that requires each student to apply the knowledge and skills they've gained in DAAS courses. This 3-credit capstone course would underscore the utility of majoring or minoring in DAAS; it would help students to recognize the concrete skills they have developed and might use to effect change in the world.