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WRITING 400

Writing 400.001 Advanced Rhetoric and Research

The Working Writer

Credits: 3 Requirements & Distribution: ULWR | Advisory Prerequisites: Completion of the First-Year Writing Requirement. May not be repeated for credit.

In this advanced level course, current Minor in Writing students and others examine how writers use rhetoric and research to engage with issues and communities they care about. In addition, students will reflect on the issues and communities important to them and develop strategies to join existing conversations with power and authority. This course provides models of rhetoric and research that extend beyond contained disciplines and genres and encourages students to widen their own approach to research to include such things as interviews, surveys, observations, and data quantification. It also gives students the opportunity to form a community of writers amongst themselves and to benefit from the class’ diverse expertise through discussion and peer review.

Course Requirements:

The two major assignments include a multi-disciplinary class anthology where each student researches the practical and rhetorical dimensions of a writer of their choice, and a substantial research project for a community that they care about. Several smaller scaffolded writing assignments including proposals and annotated bibliographies help students focus and develop these major assignments.

Intended Audience:

Current Minor in Writing students and other interested students. This course fulfills the ULWR. 

Writing 400.002 Advanced Rhetoric and Research

Writing in the Sciences

Credits: 3 Requirements & Distribution: ULWR | Advisory Prerequisites: Completion of the First-Year Writing Requirement. May not be repeated for credit.

Writing in the Sciences intends to prepare students interested in science to write in a variety of professional disciplines. Communicating scientific information calls for a keen awareness of audience expectation. Students in this course will write in at least two forms of science communication, an academic article and a public-facing news piece, in order to build skill in identifying and targeting a specific audience. Class discussions will focus on the structure of these forms and their intentions as well as elements of scientific style on the sentence level. Students will practice writing and revising in these two situations.

The course will also help students to strengthen their research skills in scientific disciplines by finding, reading, and interpreting quantitative scholarly information. Students will gain experience working collaboratively through structured peer review.

Course Requirements:

  • Regular attendance and participation
  • Peer editing and conferencing on assignment drafts
  • One-on-one conferences with course instructor
  • Research paper on a topic of scientific interest
  • Journalistic writing assignment

Intended Audience:

Upperclassmen science majors or students interested in science who want to improve their research skills as well as their skill and versatility as writers.

Note: Special offering for grad students.