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Digital Skills and Tools

  • Data and Statistical Analysis
    • The Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) Summer Program in Quantitative Methods of Social Research provides rigorous, hands-on training in statistical techniques, research methodologies, and data analysis to students from across campus, including the humanities. The schedule comprises two four-week sessions and three-five day workshops. For questions and further information, please send an e-mail to sumprog@icpsr.umich.edu  

    • The Center for Statistical Consultation and Research or CSCAR at Rackham Graduate School offers consultations and workshops to graduate students relating to the management, collection, and statistical analysis of data. CSCAR also supports the use of technical software and advanced computing in research. Please consult the CSCAR calendar for upcoming workshops and events.

    • The Certificate in Survey Methodology at the Institute for Social Research (ISR) is a part-time program for graduate students in departments other than the survey methodology program, comprising 15-16 hours of coursework over a two-year period.

    • The Summer Institute in Survey Research Techniques offers courses for graduate students in one-, three-, four-, and eight-week formats, covering topics such as research design and sample selection, measurement, qualitative methods in survey research design, data collection, and analysis.

    • Spatial and Numeric Data Service (SAND) Labs in the Art and Architecture Building and Clark Library in Hatcher South provide course-integrated and workshop-based instructions to graduate students on spatial and numeric data, in addition to offering access to spatial and statistical software (ArcGIS, QGIS, R and more) as well as assistance in data management, manipulation, visualization, and translation.

    • Computational Social Science Rackham Interdisciplinary Workshop is a forum to bring together faculty and graduate students from a wide array of disciplines to discuss and learn practical applications of diverse computational methodologies with social data.

    • Qualitative Methods Rackham Interdisciplinary Workshop brings together graduate students from sociology and other disciplines to engage in conversations with each other and faculty about using qualitative methods and field notes for grant writing and research proposals to analytic memos and peer-reviewed journal articles.

    • Statistical Learning Rackham Interdisciplinary Workshop provides a forum for graduate students to share how they have applied statistical learning techniques to solve problems in their disciplines.

    • The Academic Innovation-Digital Innovation Greenhouse (DIG) offers a range of fellowship opportunities to graduate students and recent graduates interested in designing and developing digital applications that enhance the education experience and facilitate engaged and personalized learning at U-M.

    • Campus ITS MiStorage provides faculty, staff and students the ability to store and access large amounts of data to support their specific projects in a secure and cost-effective environment. Campus ITS also offers a Sensitive Data Guide with instructions on how to share data securely. Please consult their summary chart for a comparative overview of storage options.

  • Coding and Programming
    • Innovate Blue, U-M’s hub for entrepreneurship and innovation, offers Introduction to Coding workshops during the academic year. These workshops are open to all skill levels and they focus on understanding how to code for any programming language.

    • U-M Library Scholarspace provides consultation and workshops on a range of processes and products of research and collaboration, including, but not limited to, text mining, web publishing, infographic design, and multimedia creation.

    • The Institute for the Humanities provides grant support to doctoral students in the humanities to participate in the Digital Humanities Summer Institute (DHSI) in Victoria, British Columbia each year. Participants may choose to attend one or two weeks of the institute. Topics range from fundamentals of coding and programming for humanists, critical pedagogy and digital praxis to geographical information systems in the digital humanities, digital storytelling, feminist engagements with technology, and accessibility, among others. 

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  • Visualization and Mapping
    • U-M Digital History Initiative runs a series of Friday workshops and symposia devoted to new techniques and methods for historical scholarship, centering on the analysis, visualization, and/or teaching of digital data (texts, images, quantitative information, etc.), whilst also preparing students for careers in a variety of professional domains within and beyond academia.

    • The Stephen S. Clark Library for maps, government information, and data services offers open workshops in mapping, data visualization, course instruction, and individual consultations on managing diverse types of data. Please visit their blog for tutorials on visualization work or contact Justin Joque for further information.

    • The Digital Media Commons (DMC) provides students, faculty and staff access to a state-of-the-art multimedia facility with visualization and virtual reality technologies. Located in the Duderstadt Center on North Campus, the DMC serves as a development and training center for collaborative approaches to “rich media.” The DMC includes:

      • Design Labs: A network of peer-learning environments dedicated to creative and interdisciplinary projects, hands-on experimentation with new ideas and tools at every stage of a project, as well as documenting and sharing the collaborative research process for future work.

      • Groundworks: A self-serve media lab with hardware and software for creating, editing and converting audio and video recordings of collaborative research projects.

      • UM3D Lab: A space that provides access to the tools, expertise, and collaborative opportunities needed to support cutting edge research, academic initiatives, and innovative uses of technology in teaching and learning, visualization and simulation, custom tool and application development among others.

      • Audio Studio: A laboratory set up in the style of a recording studio, designed to encourage experimentation and research, and develop skills and techniques in audio production. Project teams can also collaborate with a certified student audio engineer through this resource.

      • Video Studio: A collaborative lab, where faculty, students, visiting educators, scientists and artists can come to collaborate and produce or display high quality video and audio, as well as to experiment with media technology.

      • Advanced Training Labs: The DMC has two computer labs that are open to all U-M students, faculty and staff for advanced training in Mac or Windows software.

      • Multimedia Workrooms: These spaces are ideal for small groups that want to work together and have shared access to audio editing applications, media conversion technology, DVD authoring, and image manipulation and compositing tools. To gain access to the workrooms, team members must first attend a video editing workshop or Multimedia Workroom orientation.

  • Design
  • User Interface and Accessibility
    • U-M Library Accessibility provides resources and guidance to students and faculty on scholarship and publishing deliverables that can be accessible to a range of audiences using a broad range of technologies.

    • The Open.Michigan initiative offers training opportunities for faculty, staff, and students across campus to create and share educational resources with communities on and beyond campus using open access practices.

    • The Academic Innovation-Digital Innovation Greenhouse (DIG) offers opportunities to students with experience in HCI (Human-Computer Interaction), UX (User Experience), computer science, or related field to conduct user research and assist with UI design, rapid prototyping, and web-based tool development.

    • Students can consult with U-M Library User Experience Specialist, Heidi Steiner Burkhardt, regarding their digital projects and learn how to assess and improve existing content, identify new content needs, as well as create user-friendly content.

  • Online Curation
    • The Metadata and Data Documentation Research Guide provides a basic introduction to tools, resources, standards, and support for describing research data and make the data discoverable in repositories, understandable in context, and reusable by other researchers. For additional information, or to schedule a consultation on metadata and data documentation for your research, contact Matt Carruthers.

  • Building Archives
    • The U-M Library has resources on “Personal Digital Archiving” (PDA), including materials on the PDA conference that took place on campus in 2016, as well as other past conferences from around the country.

    • The U-M Library has also sponsored symposia and multidisciplinary conferences on archives and archiving in the past. For a complete listing of events, please consult this webpage. For staying up to date with similar events in the future, please contact Alix Keener, Digital Scholarship Librarian, at alixkee@umich.edu

    • The School of Information Master of Information Science-Libraries, Archives and Records Management concentration offers graduate level courses on media management, information architecture, information literacy, online searching and databases, digital archives and libraries, as well as internships and project-based service-learning opportunities.

    • U-M Library has put together a “Finding Archives and Manuscripts” research guide on strategies for locating primary sources, including archival and manuscript material, as well as managing the digital files and photos that you collect on your travels. Please consult a supporting “Primary Sources Primer” guide on the nature of primary sources and how to find them on campus, external to campus, and online. The U-M library Archives and Manuscripts page has additional resources on U-M databases.

    • The 2009 Open.Michigan graduate course titled, “Understanding Records and Archives: Principles and Practices,” presents terminology, concepts, and practices used in records management and archival administration. It also examines the evolution of methods and technologies used to create, store, organize, and preserve records, as well as questions of access and accessibility. Please check out a similar course from 2010 (revised 2015) on “Digital Libraries and Archives,” exploring concepts of scholarly communication, digital preservation, cyberinfrastructure, representation, and standards/best practices.