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Current Students

Current students will find answers to questions about academic requirements, housing, scholarships and grants, as well as many of the forms necessary to process student records.

Use the Make an Advising Appointment button, above, to schedule your own advising appointments. All advisors are skilled in the many majors and tracks LSA Honors students pursue. If you have a regular advisor, you may seek by the name, or you may seek appointment availability by date, day, or time. 

Below, the Quick Links will connect you to frequently visited areas under Current Students. You will also find forms, scholarship and grant information, housing details, and more, from the buttons in the task bar on the right. If you have additional questions, please email ask.honors@umich.edu.

Honors Core Curriculum for Winter 2019

Use the links below to read the full LSA Course Guide description of each course. 

HONORS 222.001 | Are We Alone? (NS, QR/2)
Instructor: Eric Bell

HONORS 230.001 | The Corporation (SS)
Instructor: Matthew Hull

HONORS 230.010 | Histories of Human Experimentation (SS)
Instructor: Joel Howell

HONORS 231.001 | Reading the Quran (HU)
Instructor: Karla Mallette

HONORS 232.001 | The Anthropocene (BS, NS)
Instructor: Anne McNeil

Honors Seminars for Winter 2019

HONORS 251.001 | The Symphonic Century: Music and Revolution in the 19th Century (HU)
Instructor: Naomi Andre

HONORS 354.001 | Race and Identity in Music (HU, RE)
Cross listed with AAS, RCHUMS, & WOMENSTD
Instructor: Naomi Andre

 

Departmental Honors Courses for Winter 2019

By selecting Honors under Special Offerings in the LSA Course Guide, students will find a fairly comprehensive list of Honors courses available for the term. Depending on course coding used by the department, you may find other courses throughout a search, but this is a great start in planning your schedule.

AMCULT 240 – Introduction to Women’s Studies (HU, RE)  

Crosslisted with WOMENSTD 240

Section: 001 (LEC), Sec 012 (DIS) 15 LSA HNRS

Instructor:  Diana Louis

This course provides an introduction to the feminist scholarship about women and gender. We explore how women’s lives differ across social categories such as race, class, sexual orientation, and age, with an emphasis on women in the United States today. Readings a familiarize students with key questions, theoretical tools, and issues within Women’s Studies. A variety of topics are covered, including: reproductive justice, gender(ed) care and labor, masculinities, girlhood, health activism, sexual harassment and the workplace, and domestic violence.

 

ANTHRCUL 258 – Honors Seminar in Anthropology

Section: 001 Culture and Medicine

Instructor:  Holly Peters-Golden

In this seminar, we will examine the ways in which health and illness are both constructed out of, and interpreted within, cultural settings. Focusing on Western biomedicine, we will discuss a broad range of illness experiences - from schizophrenia to cancer, post-traumatic stress disorder to asthma, Tourette's to Alzheimer's, among others - to address a number of questions currently central to medical anthropology. Topics may include (but will not be limited to) the meaning and alteration of self and personhood in illness; the ways in which medical knowledge is produced and imagined, the culture of science and technology, immunity and risk, illness narrative, and social and historical views of the body.

ASTRO 101, 102, 115 (NS, QR/2)

Option for an Honors Structured Study Group (SSG) for Honors credit exists. See instructor.

 

BIOLOGY 171 – Introductory Biology:  Ecology and Evolution (NS)

Section: 002, 004 (LEC), Sec 200, 201 (DIS)

Instructor:  Josephine Kurdziel

BIOLOGY 171 is a one-term course in ecology and evolutionary biology that, together with BIOLOGY 172 and 173, collectively form the introductory biology course unit.

The primary aims of BIOLOGY 171 are:

1.     to provide factual and conceptual knowledge concerning the origin and complex interactions of the Earth's biodiversity

2.     to give an integrated overview of biological organization including genes, individuals, kin groups, populations, species, communities, and ecosystems

3.     to engage with biological hypotheses dealing with prominent current issues such as human evolutionary origins, emerging diseases, conservation biology and global change

4.     to develop critical-thinking and writing skills.

Topics in BIOLOGY 171 are divided among three primary areas:

  • Mendelian genetics and evolutionary processes
  • Biodiversity, organismal biology
  • Ecology

BIOLOGY 172 – Introductory Biology – Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental (NS)

Section: 002, 004 (LEC), Sec 200, 201 (DIS)

Instructor:  Steven Clark, Lyle Simmons

BIOLOGY 172 is a one-term course in molecular, cellular, and developmental biology that, together with BIOLOGY 171 and 173, collectively forms the introductory biology course sequence.

The aims of BIOLOGY 172 are:

  • to provide factual and conceptual knowledge of how cells, organs, and organisms work; and
  • to develop scientific hypothesis-testing and critical-thinking skills.

BIOLOGY 174 – Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology (NS)

Section:  001

Instructor:  Daniel Klionsky

This is a one-term introductory biology course that is equivalent to Biology 172. It covers topics in biochemistry, cellular and molecular biology. The goal is to develop thinking skills in biological sciences with an emphasis on conceptual understanding of the material. Minimal lectures will be designed to briefly cover difficult topics with the assumption that students have read the appropriate material in the syllabus prior to class. Students will work in groups to solve problems designed to instill a practical understanding of the material. Participation in these small groups is mandatory. Group work will be followed by an additional short lecture designed to emphasize connections/relevance to other topics and “real life.”

Honors credit can be earned by doing an Honors conversion. Instructor is eager to support Honors conversions.

CHEM 215 – Structure and Reactivity II (NS)* 

Section: 200 (LEC)           

Instructor:  Pavel Nagorny

Students get further practice in applying the major concepts of chemistry to predicting the physical and chemical properties of organic compounds, including macromolecules, both synthetic and biological.

To be taken with CHEM 216

*Two ways to receive Honors credit in CHEM 215

1.  Elect any CHEM 215 section and join an Honors Structured Study Group (SSG). (3 Honors engagement points)

2.  Elect Honors CHEM 215 AND Honors CHEM 216 AND join an Honors SSG. (5 Honors engagement points)

CHEM 216 – Synthesis and Characterization of Organic Compounds (NS)

Section: 200 (LEC), 220, 230, 231, 250, 270 (LAB)

Instructor:  Alexander Poniatowski

CHEM 216 builds on the experimental approach started in CHEM 211. Students participate in planning exactly what they are going to do in the laboratory by being given general goals and directions that have to be adapted to fit the specific project they will be working on. They use microscale equipment, which requires them to develop manual dexterity and care in working in the laboratory. They also evaluate the results of their experiments by checking for identity and purity using various chromatographic and spectroscopic methods.

NOTE: Students should elect both CHEM 215 (for 3 credits) and CHEM 216 (for 2 credits).

 

GEOG 145 - Introduction to International Studies (SS)

Section:  001 (LEC), 003 (DIS) LSA HNRS

Crosslisted with INTLSTD 101

INTLSTD 101 – Introduction to International Studies (SS)

Crosslisted with GEOG 145

Section: 001 (LEC), 003 (DIS) LSA HNRS

Instructor:  Greta L. Uehling

This is the introductory core course for the International Studies major at the University of Michigan. The course explores human rights, human development and human security in historical and comparative perspective using multiple disciplinary approaches. The curriculum is divided into six modules that cover:

  • globalization;
  • international relations and organizations;
  • human rights and humanitarianism;
  • global environment and health;
  • human development; and
  • culture and identity.

Honors:
Students in the Honors section of INTLSTD 101 will have discussions with the primary instructor for the course. These discussions will address special topics that build on material covered in lecture, and enable the students to explore key topics of international significance in more depth.

LATIN 231 – Roman Kings and Emperors

Section: 001, 002

Instructor:  Deborah Pennell Ross

Great Romans in Latin prose and poetry is an intensive Honors section which covers the LATIN 231 material in half semester and includes an introduction to Vergil's Aeneid in its second half. Students who have completed successfully the Honors section can start accumulating credit towards a concentration/minor in a Classics-related field by enrolling into a 300-level LATIN course or higher for the last term of their language requirement.

MATH 176 – Explorations in Calculus (MSA, QR/1)

Section: 001 Explorations in Topology and Analysis

Instructor:  Anna Weigandt

This course is an Inquiry-Based version of Honors Calculus I and II (such as Math 185/186) and provides the necessary preparation for Multivariable Calculus (Math 215 or the honors version, Math 285). A student who has had some exposure to calculus (e.g., AB or BC in high school, or Math 115) will be well-prepared for this course. The majority of class time will be spent working in groups and presenting ideas and solutions to problems.

MATH 186 – Honors Calculus II (MSA, QR/1)

Section: 001

Instructor:  James Heffers

 Most students take calculus in high school, and it may seem that there isn't much new to learn. The goal of this course is to develop the familiar concepts of calculus using a more rigorous and theoretical approach. In particular, with its emphasis on how to use appropriate mathematical language, this course lays a solid foundation for future math courses, and is suitable for students intending to pursue a major in mathematics, science, or engineering who desire a more complete understanding of the underpinnings of calculus. This sequence is not restricted to students enrolled in the LSA Honors Program. This course is a continuation of Math 185.

MATH 285 – Honors Multivariable and Vector Calculus (MSA, QR/1)

Section: 002

Instructor: 

The sequence Math 185-186-285-286 is an introduction to calculus at the honors level. It is taken by students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields who want a somewhat more theoretical approach. Although much attention is paid to concepts and solving problems, the underlying theory and proofs of important results are also included. This sequence is not restricted to students enrolled in the LSA Honors Program.

MATH 286 – Honors Differential Equations (MSA, QR/1)

Section:  001

Instructor:  Zecheng Gan

The sequence Math 185-186-285-286 is an introduction to calculus at the honors level. It is taken by students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields who want a somewhat more theoretical approach. Although much attention is paid to concepts and solving problems, the underlying theory and proofs of important results are also included. This sequence is not restricted to students enrolled in the LSA Honors Program. 

MATH 296 – Honors Mathematics II (QR/1)

Section:  001

Instructor:  Sarah Koch

Math 295-296-395-396 is the most theoretical and demanding honors calculus sequence. The emphasis is on concepts, problem solving, as well as the underlying theory and proofs of important results. It provides an excellent background for advanced courses in mathematics. The expected background is high school trigonometry and algebra (previous calculus is not required, but is helpful.) This sequence is not restricted to students enrolled in the LSA Honors program. Math 295 and 296 may be substituted for any Math 451 requirement. Math 296 and 395 may be substituted for any Math 217 requirement. 

MATH 297 – An Introduction to Analysis (MSA, QR/1)

Section:  001

Instructor:  Stephen DeBacker

This is a course in analysis for students who know how to write rigorous mathematical arguments and possess a firm understanding of the standard concepts of linear algebra. It is specifically designed for students who excelled in Math 217, love mathematics, and wish to transition into the Honors Analysis Sequence.

PHIL 296 – Honors Introduction to Logic (MSA, QR/1)

Section:  001

Instructor: 

The great philosopher-mathematician Leibniz dreamed of a grand system of logic that would allow us to settle all disputes. He said: “If we had it, we should be able to reason in metaphysics and morals in much the same way as in geometry and analysis” and “If controversies were to arise, there would be no more need for disputation between two philosophers than between two accountants. For it would suffice to take their pencils in their hands, to sit down to their slates, and to say to each other (with a friend as witness if they liked): Let us calculate.”

Leibniz died 300 years ago, so it is time to check up on the progress of his project. We will find that it is radically incomplete. We will take a look at a number of attempts to characterize good reasoning, involving classical and non-classical logic, probability, and statistics. No familiarity with any of these topics will be presupposed. For each, we will look at its limitations and weaknesses as well as its strengths.

The tools we develop will be useful for anyone studying philosophy, mathematics, computer science, cognitive science, economics, psychology ..... In short they will be useful for anyone who wants to understand reasoning—or who wants to reason well.

PHYSICS 160 – Honors Physics I (NS, QR/1)

Section: 001

Instructor:  August Evrard

PHYSICS 160 covers the fundamental principles of mechanics using a modern perspective. It emphasizes the applicability of these laws in systems ranging from binary stars to nuclear collisions. This class will be different, and more interesting, than any physics course you have taken yet.

The goals of the course are:

1.     Application of fundamental principles to a wide range of systems, i.e., from nuclei to stars (unify mechanics)

2.     Integrate contemporary physics (atomic models of matter, relativistic dynamics)

3.     Engage students in physical modeling (idealization, approximation, assumptions, estimation)

4.     Integrate computational physics (now a partner of theory and experiment) into problem solving

PHYSICS 161 – Honors Introductory Mechanics Lab (NS)

Section: 001

Instructor:  Wolfgang Lorenzon

PHYSICS 161 is a three-hour weekly laboratory designed to accompany PHYSICS 160.

This lab introduces students to the core concepts of physics, namely careful observations, both quantitative and qualitative, followed by comparison with appropriate mathematical models that serve as the basis for descriptive interpretation. Course material is focused on developing a good understanding of the concepts and principles of Newtonian mechanics while providing sophisticated experiments for demonstrating the validity of these fundamental paradigms.

PHYSICS 260 – Honors Physics II (NS, QR/1)

Section: 001

Instructor:  David Gerdes

PHYSICS 260 is a continuation of PHYSICS 160 and introduces the theory of electromagnetic phenomena. This course will introduce you to:

1.     The deeper physical meaning of the concepts

2.     A rigorous mathematical approach, using vector calculus when applicable

3.     Problem solving including computer use

4.     Contemporary applications

If you like physics and math, appreciate the deeper meaning and derivation of concepts and equations, and if you like to do problems, you are in the right course.

PHYSICS 261 – Honors Electricity and Magnetism Lab (NS)

Section: 001, 002

Instructor:  Andrew D. Tomasch

PHYSICS 261 is a three-hour weekly laboratory designed to accompany PHYSICS 260. This lab introduces students to the core concepts of physics, namely careful observations, both quantitative and qualitative, followed by comparison with appropriate mathematical models that serve as the basis for descriptive interpretation. Course material is focused on developing a good understanding of the concepts and principles of Newtonian mechanics while providing sophisticated experiments for demonstrating the validity of these fundamental paradigms. The analytical techniques require high school level algebra and some familiarity with statistical measures of significance, procedures common to any scientific, technical, or medical area of inquiry. Although not an academic requirement, it is assumed that the students will have some basic skills in using a computer at the level of a word processing program or similar application task.

PSYCH 114 – Honors Introduction to Psychology (SS)

Section: 001

Instructor:  Twila Tardif

This course is designed to introduce Honors students to contemporary psychology. At the end of this class, the student should realize that psychological research addresses a wide range of issues, and that the methods used to study these issues are equally numerous. In order to achieve these objectives, this course will cover a broad range of topics:

      I.        Part one is a general introduction to psychology (definitions, history, methods).

     II.        In Part two, we will look at psychology on four levels of analysis, namely

                     a.        on a biological level (nervous system, behavioral genetics, and evolutionary psychology),

                     b.        a "basic processes" level (perception, learning, memory, information processing, motivation, and emotion),

                     c.        on a level considering the person as a unit (development, personality theories, psychopathology, treatment of mental disorders), and finally,

                     d.        on a "social / cultural" level, which focuses on understanding the individual in a social / cultural context (social cognition, social influence, social interaction: intragroup and inter group processes.).

    III.        In Part three, we will study one specific problem, namely stress in college, and how psychologists study this problem

                     a.        on a biological level (stress and health, sleep, eating behavior),

                     b.        on a basic process level,

                     c.        on a person-centered level (are there personal styles that might make coping with stress easier?), and

                     d.        on a social level (how does social support influence our adjustment to stress?).

WOMENSTD 240– Introduction to Women’s Studies (HU, RE)

Crosslisted with AmCult 240

Section: 001 (LEC), Sec 012 (DIS) 15 LSA HNRS

Instructor:  Diana Louis

This course provides an introduction to the feminist scholarship about women and gender. We explore how women’s lives differ across social categories such as race, class, sexual orientation, and age, with an emphasis on women in the United States today. Readings a familiarize students with key questions, theoretical tools, and issues within Women’s Studies. A variety of topics are covered, including: reproductive justice, gender(ed) care and labor, masculinities, girlhood, health activism, sexual harassment and the workplace, and domestic violence.

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