ECON 741 - Interdisciplinary Problem Solving
Winter 2023, Section 001 - Forced labor is used to build and maintain physical structures. Leveraging an understanding of the role that exploited labor plays in such projects, students will apply features of index systems used in various other fields to develop indices that effectively measure how much forced labor is associated with a given construction project. Insights from law, business, policy, health sciences, and other fields will be applied. Multi-disciplinary student teams will learn from experts, conduct research, and harness problem solving tools to develop innovative and relevant solutions.
Instruction Mode: Section 001 is  In Person (see other Sections below)
Subject: Economics (ECON)
Department: LSA Economics
See additional student enrollment and course instructor information to guide you in your decision making.

Details

Credits:
3
Consent:
With permission of department.
Advisory Prerequisites:
Graduate/Professional Standing.
Repeatability:
May be repeated for credit.
Primary Instructor:
Instructor:
Start/End Date:
Partial Term 1/11/23 - 4/19/23 (see other Sections below)
NOTE: Drop/Add deadlines are dependent on the class meeting dates and will differ for full term versus partial term offerings.
For information on drop/add deadlines, see the Office of the Registrar and search Registration Deadlines.

Description

"Interdisciplinary Problem Solving" is a course offered at the Law School through the Problem Solving Initiative (PSI). (https://problemsolving.law.umich.edu/) Through a team-based, experiential, and interdisciplinary learning model, small groups of U-M graduate and professional students work with faculty to explore and offer solutions to emerging, complex problems.

Schedule

ECON 741 - Interdisciplinary Problem Solving
Schedule Listing
001 (LAB)
 In Person
10208
Open
2
 
-
Tu 12:30PM - 3:30PM
Partial Term 1/11/23 - 4/19/23
Note: This class is an interdisciplinary problem solving class offered at the Law School through the Problem Solving Initiative (PSI). Forced labor is used to build and maintain physical structures. Leveraging an understanding of the role that exploited labor plays in such projects, students will apply features of index systems used in various other fields to develop indices that effectively measure how much forced labor is associated with a given construction project. Insights from law, business, policy, health sciences, and other fields will be applied. Multi-disciplinary student teams will learn from experts, conduct research, and harness problem solving tools to develop innovative and relevant solutions. This class is open to all University of Michigan graduate and professional students. Please note: Non-Law students are responsible for checking with their own schools, colleges, or units to learn if a PSI class will count toward graduation or other departmental requirements. Non-law graduate/professional students may apply for the course using the PSI application system (https://michigan.law.umich.edu/problem-solving-initiative) October 31 - November 13, 2022. After the initial application period, students seeking to apply can contact problemsolving@umich.edu.
002 (LAB)
 In Person
10216
Closed
0
 
-
Th 12:30PM - 3:30PM
Partial Term 1/11/23 - 4/19/23
Note: This class is an interdisciplinary problem solving class offered at the Law School through the Problem Solving Initiative (PSI). The Human Trafficking Lab is a social justice innovation space where multidisciplinary student teams use design thinking to research, incubate, and build replicable, scalable, and disruptive solutions to reduce vulnerability to trafficking. We believe the law is an incomplete, imperfect solution to reducing exploitation and that interdisciplinary, cross-industry collaboration is necessary. Thus, the Lab is geared towards creating systems level change at policy, service, and industry levels through collaborative partnerships across the nonprofit, corporate, and governmental sectors. This class is open to all University of Michigan graduate and professional students. Please note: Non-Law students are responsible for checking with their own schools, colleges, or units to learn if a PSI class will count toward graduation or other departmental requirements. Non-law graduate/professional students may apply for the course using the PSI application system (https://michigan.law.umich.edu/problem-solving-initiative) October 31 - November 13, 2022. After the initial application period, students seeking to apply can contact problemsolving@umich.edu.

Textbooks/Other Materials

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Click the button below to view and buy textbooks for ECON 741.001

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Syllabi

Syllabi are available to current LSA students. IMPORTANT: These syllabi are provided to give students a general idea about the courses, as offered by LSA departments and programs in prior academic terms. The syllabi do not necessarily reflect the assignments, sequence of course materials, and/or course expectations that the faculty and departments/programs have for these same courses in the current and/or future terms.

Click the button below to view historical syllabi for ECON 741 (UM login required)

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CourseProfile (Atlas)

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CourseProfile (Atlas)