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Water Ties as Political Methodology in the Everglades and Beyond

Water Ways: New Social Science, Science Studies, and Environmental Approaches to Water
Monday, January 24, 2022
12:00-3:00 PM
Virtual
Water Ties as Political Methodology in the Everglades and Beyond
Jessica Cattelino, UCLA

Monday, Jan 24, Open Talks 12-1pm, Grad Workshops 1-3pm.
In-person in ISR-Thompson 6050
Presentations will also be available online via Zoom

Abstract:
Water connects and obligates people to one another and to their environments in this time of ecological reckoning. Water ties, in this presentation, is an analytical term for, first, the ways that people are tied to water and are obliged to care for it, and second, the consequential and patterned ways that people are tied to one another through their relationships to water. In the Florida Everglades, where the world’s largest wetlands restoration project is underway and where pitched battles are fought over the values of agricultural production (especially sugarcane) and ecosystem health, water ties are the underappreciated keys to achieving flourishing with contested waters. Water ties are also political methodology: methodology for ecosystem governance, for Seminole sovereignty, and for ethnography.

This is a part of the Research Center for Group Dynamics (RCGD) Winter 2022 Series - "Water Ways: New Social Science, Science Studies, and Environmental Approaches to Water"

This is also a part of the class Anthrcul 558 section 002
Building: Institute For Social Research
Event Link:
Website:
Event Type: Presentation
Tags: agriculture, climate, Ecology, Environment, environmental, environmental justice, Free, Health, Health Data, Humanities, Natural Sciences, Political Science, Politics, Public Health, Public Policy, Research, Social Impact, Social Sciences, Sociology, Sustainability, sustainable food systems
Source: Happening @ Michigan from Institute for Social Research, Department of American Culture, Science, Technology & Society, Department of Anthropology, Native American Studies, American Studies Consortium