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Current Museum Building

Changes to the Ruthven Museums Building

The Edmontosaurus needs a lot of preparation before it can move to the new museum. In April, a wall will be constructed in front of the specimen to protect visitors and exhibits from dust as specialists remove the bones from the plaster it's been lying in for decades. Visitors can peek through windows to watch the process.

After it is removed, U-M paleontologists will examine the bones which will then be prepared for display in the Biological Science Building.

Butterfly and Pollinator Garden

In the Spring of 2017, many of the carefully curated native plants will be moved to a "storage bed" to await later replanting near the new Museum in the Biological Science Building.

What’s happening at the current Museum?

 

Museum on the Move

Discover where we’ve come from and where we’re headed in ​this exhibit about our past and future. View fascinating historic images and plans for the new museum, and revisit past exhibit favorites retrieved from our archives. 4th floor.

 

The Bristle Mammoth

The Bristle Mammoth will be on display through December 31, 2017, and then will move with us to the new Museum!

 

 

Share a Memory!

Share a Memory! - To help celebrate the University of Michigan’s Bicentennial in 2017, and in anticipation of the move to the Biological Science Building, the Museum is collecting and sharing heartfelt memories from those whose lives have been impacted by the Museum—in ways big and small!

 

What will happen to the Ruthven Museums Building?

The Rotunda Lobby in the Alexander G. Ruthven Museums Building

One of the most frequently asked questions we hear when we talk about plans for the new Museum in the Biological Science Building is: “What will happen to the current Museum building?”

We are pleased to share that the Board of Regents has approved a conceptual plan to preserve the 1928 Albert H. Kahn-designed Ruthven Museums Building and repurpose it for administration, research, and classroom use.  You can learn more here.