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Current Students

Current students will find answers to questions about academic requirements, housing, scholarships and grants, as well as many of the forms necessary to process student records.

By using the appointment button, above, you can schedule your own advising appointments. All advisors and preceptors are skilled in the many majors and tracks LSA Honors students pursue. If you have a regular advisor, you may seek by name, or you are able to seek appointment availability by date, day, or time. 

Below, the Quick Links will connect you to frequently visited areas under Current Students.

You will also find forms, scholarship and grant information, housing details, and more, from the buttons in the task bar on the right. 

If you have additional questions, please email ask.honors@umich.edu.

Honors Core Curriculum for Fall 2016

Here's an overview of the Honors Core Courses offered in Fall 2016. You will find more information, including ART 2.0 and syllabi, in the LSA Course Guide. Note: FYWR denotes that the course satisfies the First Year Writing Requirement.

GTBOOKS 191 – Honors Humanities (HU + FYWR)
Section 001 Great Books
Instructor: Ruth Scodel
We will read texts from the ancient Near East and Greece that ask how mortals should live in the face of death, how we should balance our personal desires with the demands of the community, and the nature of justice. Readings (all in English translation) will include Gilgamesh, Homer, Genesis and Exodus (Hebrew Bible), Greek tragedy, and Plato. Students will be encouraged to consider for themselves what makes a book great and to think about what we can learn (if anything) by studying ancient texts.

HONORS 230 – Honors Core in Social Science  (SS)
Section 001 Living with Animals
Instructor: Robin M Queen
Much human social life involves interactions with non-human animals or interactions with other humans about animals. This course creates a space to explore those interactions. In it, we think about broad questions connected to the fundamental distinctions many humans draw between themselves and other animals and about the nature of our relationships with those other animals. These questions range from humans' early history with other species; how we decide which animals are friends, which are pests, and which are food; in what sense we can own animals; how we understand (or don't) animals’ lives and experiences; how we domesticate some species and not others; how we communicate with other animals; whether other species inherently have rights; how humans come to work in partnership with other species; and how human emotional lives are affected by our relationships with animals. We'll read about and investigate these questions together, drawing on a range of disciplines such as anthropology, philosophy, linguistics, sociology, economics, anthrozooology, and psychology. READ MORE AT LINK.

HONORS 231 - Honors Core in the Humanities (HU)
Section 001 Reasoning and Reasoning
Instructor: Sarah Buss
Everyone agrees that human beings have an amazing power to reason. This power enables us to challenge our own desires, goals, and habits of mind. It enables us to explain why things happen and to predict what will happen next. In this course, we will explore the relation between reason and faith, reason and morality, reason and science, reason and action, and more. Without the capacity to reason, it would never occur to us to reflect on ourselves, and so it would never occur to us to change how we think and live. In exploring the power and limits of reason, we will be engaging in this very process of self-reflection. Most of our guides will be philosophers. But we will also seek insight from other fields, as well as from short works of fiction and perhaps even a film or two.

HONORS 232 – Honors Core in Natural Science  (NS)
Section 001 Biology and Society
Instructor: Trisha Wittkopp | homepage 
Are GMOs dangerous? Do vaccines cause autism? Should we be worried about antibiotic resistance? Biological research and the way it is communicated to the public by media outlets impacts our everyday lives in many ways. In this course, we will discuss the nature and process of science, how scientific results make their way from laboratory benches to media headlines, and examine a series of biological “hot topics” currently in the news. Students will learn enough about each area of biology discussed to understand relevant research papers, will be able to evaluate the experimental design and conclusions drawn in these studies, and will critically examine the presentation of biological findings to the general public.

HONORS 240 – Honors Core in Social Science (SS + FYWR)
Section 001 The Games We Play
Instructor: Mika LaVaque-Manty | homepage
Games — real and metaphorical, formal and informal — are everywhere where humans are: Games are a metaphor for politics, romance, and much in between. There are children's games, war games, and the Olympic Games. In the world of fiction, there are games of thrones and hunger games. People watch and play football; others play it on their XBox and Playstation consoles. Some games seem to have a gender, while some gamers want to exclude one gender from their world. Language is a game. There’s the game of life, and college is an important part of it. READ MORE AT LINK

HONORS 241 – Honors Core Writing in Humanities (HU + FYWR)
Section 001 Great Performances at Michigan
Instructor: Yopie Prins
This course is an introduction to performance in music, theater, dance and related arts. In a combination of lecture and discussion sections, the course will focus on specific works to be performed on campus, while also exploring the relation between tradition and innovation in performing “great” works, and asking what makes a “great” performance. Students registered for the course attend a series of events presented by performing arts organizations in the university community, including the Ann Arbor Symphony Orchestra (AASO), the University Musical Society (UMS), and the U-M School of Music, Theater, and Dance (SMTD). READ MORE AT LINK. COURSE FEE: $50 ADDED TO UM FEES COVERS ALL PERFORMANCE TICKETS.

Director's Cut for Fall 2016

Here's a look at some noteworthy courses for Fall 2016 scheduling. We call them the "Director's Cut." If you have specific questions about how these courses will work with your particular degree requirements, please email your advisor.

STATS 280 | Honors Intro to Stats

Course Guide. STATS 280 will provide in-depth discussion of models and methods that are appropriate to spectific situations, criteria for selecting among them, their strengths and weaknesses and their conceptual footing. Interactive learning will be emphasized in lectures and the laboratory module.

HIST 197.006 | Vienna, Budapest, Prague 1900: Central European Identities and Cultures

This course will explore the relationships among national and other identities, modern arts, architecture, and literatures, and socio-political contexts in the three metropolises of central Europe before and after the collapse of that empire. [Watch Course Guide for complete course description.]

HONORS 250 | Evolution of Cognition & Social Science Ways of Knowing

Course Guide. There is now overwhelming evidence for the evolution of all known life. This course will focus on the evolution of human cognition and its implications for what we know and believe about cognition today, particularly social science knowledge.

HONORS 309 | Imagination

Course Guide. This course hypothesizes that imagination can be a rigorous and objective faculty. What is its relationship to rationality? To insight and innovation? Does some form of imagination have a place in science and ethics? In business? The key faculty of metaphorical thinking will be considered in some depth, as will the function of imagination in scientific discovery, the psychology of perception, politics, and visual art.

PHIL 296 | Honors Introduction to Logic

Course Guide. This course is a fast-paced introduction for formal logic. It focusses on model-building, where we show that some claims can be true together by building a model where they are all true, and on proofs, where we show that some claims guarantee that another claim is true by deriving the latter claim from the others. 

PSYCH 114 | Honors Introduction to Psychology

Course Guide. This course is designed to introduce Honors students to contemporary psychology. At the end of this class, the student should realize that psychological research addresses a wide range of issues, and that the methods used to study these issues are equally numerous.

 

Honors 135 Mini-Courses for Fall 2016

These quick videos highlight the Honors 135 1-credit mini-courses found in the LSA Course Guide.

 

Honors Core Curriculum for Winter 2017

HONORS 230 – Honors Core in Social Science (SS)
Capitalisms
Instructor: Jim Adams
What exactly is capitalism? Does it express itself similarly in all countries? In all time periods?

This course will explore the many varieties of capitalism, including: merchant capitalism, religious capitalism, industrial capitalism, financial capitalism, imperial capitalism, state capitalism, welfare capitalism, crony capitalism, and global capitalism.

Readings are drawn from such classics as Adam Smith’s Wealth of Nations. They are drawn also from the scholarly and popular works of contemporary economists, historians, and political scientists.

HONORS 230 - Honors Core in Social Science (NEW) (SS)
History of Human Experimentation
Instructor: Joel Howell

HONORS 231 – Honors Humanities Seminar  (HU)
The West After 1492
Instructor: Susan Scott Parrish
This course will offer you an interdisciplinary introduction to the history, and especially the cultures, of Europe and North America after Columbus’ accidental arrival in the western hemisphere in 1492. After Columbus’ landfall, the “old worlds” — as people knew them around the Atlantic Ocean — gradually died, and a challenging, disruptive “modern” world slowly came into being. Inaugurated was a vast movement of peoples, diseases, ideas, and biology across the Atlantic. Out of these movements came: European empires in the Americas; displacements and realignments of indigenous, African and European people; chattel slavery, the “triangular trade” and the invention of “race”; dramatic environmental changes; empirical science; capitalism, and the list goes on!

I want to explore with you the art and ideas which flowed from, represented and produced these changes. Given that we will look at 500+ years of history, our selections will be idiosyncratic, based in part on their ability to allow us to delve into many issues at once. Special emphasis will be placed on literature (written in or translated into English), visual art, performance and film.

HONORS 231 - Honors Core in Humanities (HU)
Reasoning About Reasoning
Instructor: Sarah Buss

Everyone agrees that human beings have an amazing power to reason. This power enables us to challenge our own desires, goals, and habits of mind. It enables us to explain why things happen and to predict what will happen next. In this course, we will explore the relation between reason and faith, reason and morality, reason and science, reason and action, and more. Without the capacity to reason, it would never occur to us to reflect on ourselves, and so it would never occur to us to change how we think and live. In exploring the power and limits of reason, we will be engaging in this very process of self-reflection. Most of our guides will be philosophers. But we will also seek insight from other fields, as well as from short works of fiction and perhaps even a film or two.

 

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