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"The Imitation Game" COG SCI goes to the movies

Wednesday, January 7, 2015
12:00 AM
Michigan Theatre

Cognitive Science majors and students enrolled in Cognitive Science 200 are invited to attend a free screening at the Michigan Theater of The Imitation Game. Nominated for five Golden Globes and endorsed by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation for its compelling and realistic portrayal of science and technology, the film is based on the life of Alan Turing, a British computer-science pioneer, logician, and World War II code-breaker who was later tragically persecuted for being gay.

Ann Arbor, MI -- On January 7, 2015, Cognitive Science majors and students enrolled in Cognitive Science 200 are invited to attend a free screening at the Michigan Theater of The Imitation Game. Nominated for five Golden Globes and endorsed by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation for its compelling and realistic portrayal of science and technology, the film is based on the life of Alan Turing, a British computer-science pioneer, logician, and World War II code-breaker who was later tragically persecuted for being gay.

Professor Richard Lewis—who teaches COG200, the gateway course to the undergraduate major that features a section on Turing—organized the event for students. 

"The life of Alan Turing is one of the most compelling scientific stories of the 20th century,” says Lewis. “In one narrative, we see the fragile struggle of an individual dealing with societal persecution alongside the mind-boggling power of theoretical ideas to change the course of history. [Turing's] ideas laid the foundation for both the computer revolution and the cognitive revolution. [The film] gives us a chance to see this remarkable story brought to life."

The new Cognitive Science major is co-sponsored by the Departments of Linguistics, Philosophy and Psychology and is ‘housed’ within UofM’s Weinberg Institute for Cognitive Science established in 2014. The major combines courses in linguistics, psychology, philosophy, Computer Science and Engineering, Political Science and economics to explore the intricacies of the human mind. Lewis hopes the film will serve as further proof of the field's broad applicability and will encourage more students to pursue majors in Cognitive Science.

Written by Rachel Reed