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The Origins of European Pluralism

Tuesday, April 20, 2010
12:00 AM
1636 International Institute, 1080 S. University Ave, Ann Arbor, MI 48109

presented by Xavier Rubert de Ventós

The Center for European Studies-European Union Center (CES-EUC) at the University of Michigan is pleased to welcome Xavier Rubert de Ventós on April 20 to deliver the EUC Annual Distinguished Lecture on Europe, titled "The Origins of European Pluralism." Professor de Ventós teaches aesthetics at the Barcelona School of Architecture. In his talk he will address the following questions: What are the relationships between globalization and European identities? Will Europe become a space where individuals with different identities are not hierarchically ordered, or will it become again a space so preoccupied with exclusive identification to endanger its own self-preservation?

During his distinguished academic and political career, Professor de Ventós has been a visiting professor at the University of California, Berkeley and the Santayana Fellow at Harvard University. He is a founding member of the New York Institute for the Humanities and the "Cátedra Barcelona – New York." As a politician, he has been a member of the Spanish Parliament and the European Parliament. Some of his main works are translated into English: Self-Defeated Man. Personal Identity and Beyond (1975), Heresies in Modern Art (1979), and The Hispanic Labyrinth (1991).

PLACE: 1636 International Institute, 1080 S. University Ave, Ann Arbor, MI 48109

SPONSORS: Center for European Studies-European Union Center, Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, and Weiser Center for Emerging Democracies

CONTACTS: Nataša Gruden-Alajbegovic, 734-647-2743, ces-euc@umich.edu

WEB LINKS: www.ii.umich.edu/ces-euc

The Ronald and Eileen Weiser Center for Europe and Eurasia (WCEE) supports faculty and student research, teaching, collaboration, and public engagement in studying the institutions, cultures, and histories of these regions. WCEE is housed in the University of Michigan International Institute with the Center for European Studies-European Union Center (CES-EUC); the Center for Russian, East European, & Eurasian Studies (CREES); and the Weiser Center for Emerging Democracies (WCED). Named in honor of Ronald and Eileen Weiser and inspired by their time in Slovakia during Ambassador Weiser’s service as U.S. ambassador from 2001-04, WCEE began operations in September 2008. For more information, visit http://www.ii.umich.edu/wcee.