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Course Descriptions

SAC 190 First Year Film Seminar

Enrollment restricted to first year students, including those with sophomore standing. (3; 2 in the half term). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

The goal of this course is to help students understand the ways in which cinema functions as a form for artistic expression. The course will examine cinematically specific structures (time and space manipulation, montage, etc.) as well as examine film's relationship to other artistic enterprises such as theater, literature, painting, etc. Although based on this premise, topics will rotate.

SAC 202-Introduction to Digital Media Studies

(4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. AMCULT 202.

This course examines contemporary topics in digital studies by focusing on current debates prompted by the relationship between new media and society. Students are introduced to key frameworks for studying the aesthetic, social, political, and economic impact of internet connectivity, digital platforms, technological innovation, small screens, and mobile media.

SAC 210 Intro to Screenwriting

SAC 236. (3). May not be taken for SAC elective credit, Required for students intending to sub-major in Screenwriting. May not be repeated for credit.

Excellent preparation for screenwriting, this course focuses on developing an appreciation of great film screenplays as dramatic literature and an understanding of what characterizes them as such. The readings will progress from screenplay adaptations and their source materials to original screenplays, covering a broad range of themes and genres.

SAC 232 / AAS 232 Survey of African American Cinema

(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines the history and aesthetics of African American film making form the silent era to the present. Films are analyzed within their socio-cultural contexts, with particular attention to how race and identity interact with class, gender, and sexuality. We will consider the link between film and other forms of Black popular culture.

SAC 236 / RCHUMS 236 The Art of the Film

(4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course teaches the essential terms and methods for the critical study and appreciation of film art. Students learn how to look closely at movies while recognizing different ways that cinematography, sound, editing, and mise en scène shape the meaning of a film. Topics include the language of film, cinematic storytelling, film style, authorship, genre, and ideology. Course emphasizes critical viewing, critical analysis, and critical writing.

SAC 245 / ASIAN 245. Anime

(4). May not be repeated for credit.

In this course, we examine the history of Japanese animation and its relationship to the social, political, and economic transformations of the nation. Anime's roots are in 1930s children's films promoting the colonization of Asia, followed by propaganda films from World War II.

SAC 250 / HJCS 250 / JUDAIC 250. Jewish Film: Race, Ethnicity, and Nationality

(4). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

This lecture course offers an introduction to Jewish cinema from the earliest silent films to contemporary animated documentary. A range of European, American, and Israeli films will offer contrasting representations of Jewish ethnicity across diverse national contexts. We will consider how the nexus of race, ethnicity, religion, gender, sexuality and class informs images of Jews on the screen created in divergent historical periods and political circumstances.

SAC 272 Classical Film Theory

(3). May not be repeated for credit.

What is cinema? What are its defining properties? What should film do, and what does it do best? How do spectators perceive and understand projected moving images? These are kinds of questions that classical film theory attempted to answer. This course examines the writings of a number of classical film theorists, working to understand, apply, and interrogate their respective arguments in relation to a series of selected films.

SAC 290 Introduction to Media Production

SAC 236 or RCHUMS 236, completed with a minimum grade of C- or better. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

SAC 290 is a hands-on survey course in media production introducing television, digital video, and film. Students gain first hand experience in strategies and techniques of scripting and pre-production, production, and post-production. Students will master a basic understanding of the aesthetics and processes of film, video, and television production.

SAC 300 Dramatic Narrative I

SAC 290; and major in Screen Arts and Cultures. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This introductory motion picture course familiarizes students with dramatic narrative movie production from interpreting the screenplay through location production techniques and post-production. It provides students with a solid understanding of how standard movie production processes and techniques are used to effectively communicate ideas in Dramatic Narrative productions (any genre: comedy to drama). Students work in teams of four to six to produce two short films as well as participating in two in-class dramatic narrative film productions.

SAC 301 Documentary I

SAC 290 and SAC major. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is designed to teach the theoretical, aesthetic and technical principles of making a meaningful and compelling documentary. An introduction to documentary, this class will focus on knowing what makes a story compelling and how to clearly convey ideas visually. The craft of shaping of story ideas, creating powerful images that drive the story, capturing and use of sound, script writing, narration, and advanced editing with Final Cut Pro will be explored.

SAC 302 Television I

SAC 290; and major in Screen Arts and Cultures. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Building on previous television experience, this course is designed to focus on the relationship between technique and content in television programs. Students receive continued hands-on experience in multi-camera studio television production through a series of increasingly complex directing projects.

SAC 304 Topics in Media Production I

SAC 290 with a minimum grade of C- or better, and major in Screen Arts and Cultures. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (1-3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This course provides intermediate experience in special production topics: Film, video, television and/or digital production and may focus on a particular subject area and/or approach to the medium.

SAC 305 The Experimental Screen

Following up on some of the concepts in SAC 290, this course encourages students to consider alternative and hybrid practices in moving image and sound production. We will examine the numerous production and presentation tools and how they can be used to make compelling time-based media projects. Students will work individually and in small groups to conceptualize, write and produce works for a variety of settings in a range of media including 16mm film, HD video, portable mini cameras and other resources.

SAC 306 New Media Practices I

SAC 290. Students should have basic working knowledge of the Macintosh platform, Photoshop, and digital video. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is an intensive, 15-week introduction to time-based new media processes and practices. With an emphasis on individual and team-based activities, students engage with an array of materials, hardware and software to produce short projects for a variety of potential platforms that include single-channel presentation, web-based programming, portable media, installation and live audio/visual performance. Using 2D animation as a starting point we consider a number of current strategies to produce media (both lens-based and non lens-based), how it has evolved, and how contemporary new media interface with current cinematic and artistic practices.

SAC 307 Film Analysis for Filmmakers

SAC 236 and SAC 290. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Filmmakers learn about filmmaking by watching films. This course reverse engineers movies to understand how they were produced. The goal is to learn from a finished film how the scenes were produced in front of the camera and microphone and how the captured material was edited.

SAC 308 Screenwriting for Non-Majors

(3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit. Does not count towards the SAC major.

In this course designed for non-majors, students are required to write character profiles, a treatment, a complete three-act step outline for their proposed screenplay, and a first act of approximately 25 pages.

SAC 310 Screenwriting I: The Feature Script

SAC 210, SAC 290, SAC majors only. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course teaches students to write a feature-length screenplay. Students begin with the development of a concept, proceed to writing a treatment, and then spend the majority of the semester working on the full script. Students will read and critique each other's work.

SAC 311. Writing for Television I: The Spec Script

SAC 290, SAC majors only. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This course teaches students to write full length teleplays for various small-screen formats. The class has rotating formats so students will focus on one genre or serial format during a given semester, such as sit-coms, dramas, soap-operas, etc.

SAC 313 / RCHUMS 313 / SLAVIC 313 Russian and Ukrainian Cinema

(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

The course spans the period 1917-present, from the Russian pioneers of film montage to the varied cinematic approaches of recent directors. All films are viewed, analyzed, and discussed with respect to their intrinsic aesthetic structure and to the cultural trends and socio-political events of the period and country.

SAC 314 / POLISH 314 Polish Cinema

(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Course covers Polish cinema from WWII to the present, tracing the development of film styles in the context of the historical, political, and cultural features of Polish society, with focus on the use of realist norms, intricate symbolism, and absurdist allegory to critique the loss of civic values under Communism.

SAC 315 / CZECH 315 The Czech New Wave and Its Legacy

(3). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

This course covers an extremely important film movement in Eastern Europe, encompassing a broad range of film styles, from cinema verite (Milos Forman) to surrealism and the absurd (Chytilova, Svankmayer). It also critiques authoritarian systems, ethnic discrimination, and sexism. Fourteen films are studied and discussed, with accompanying readings. Three medium-length papers are required.

SAC 316 / ITALIAN 316 Screening Italian-Americans

(3). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines the history of Italian Americans' representation from gangster films to “The Jersey Shore”. It also explores how the American film and television industries have historically translated stereotypes about Italians' national, racial, and ethnic difference into a wide range of appealing representations to achieve popular and political consensus.

SAC 320 Documentary Film

SAC 236. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

The films studied in this course will be selected from the full spectrum of documentary film practices from the 1920's to the present, but will concentrate on the specific topics rather than on a historical overview. The developing and shifting conception of documentary film practice, issues of social import, of political and propagandistic values, of documenting the "other" as well as claims to veracity and objectivity, will be treated within an analytical framework.

SAC 324/COMM 251 Understanding Media Industries
(4)
Understanding Media Industries guides students through an introductory exploration of the complex and rapidly evolving media industries in the U.S. The course examines the influence of media industry organization and practices on society at the same time that it offers students pursuing both scholarly and professional careers related to the media industries a comprehensive overview of how the industries work, why they work as they do, and the broader theoretical and practical implications of the media industries. Questions such as “why is media industry organization important?” “how do we make sense of media industry changes?” and “what are the key issues facing media industries?” animate our analysis. Here we understand the business of media as a component of its status as culture. Students should leave the course with expanded knowledge of the inner-workings of the media industries to which they will subscribe and consume from throughout their lives.

SAC 325 New Line and New Hollywood Cinema

(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This class examines New Line Cinema as a way to better understand the cultural, economic, and historical conditions of contemporary cinema. By looking at the different films, genres, and franchises put out by New Line, we will see how they have shaped the cultural scene in the United States since 1967.

SAC 330 / ENGLISH 330 Major Directors

SAC 236 (3). (HU). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

The various sections of this course are devoted to concentrated analysis of particular directors or of particular schools of filmmaking. Representative films are shown and discussed in terms of their place in the context of film history. General theoretical concepts a bout film are developed.

SAC 331 / ENGLISH 331 Film Genres and Types

SAC 236. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Careful analytical studies of representative films from various film genres. The course concentrates on one particular genre every semester it is offered. Past subjects have included non-narrative film, post-1972 gore, farce, and the American musical.

SAC 332 / GERMAN 330 German Cinema

(3; 2 in the half-term). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

An introduction to German cinema and its cultural background from the beginning to the present, with emphasis on the classical period (ca. 1918 to 1938) and the modern (post-1965) resurgence.

SAC 333 / GERMAN 333 Fascist Cinemas

SAC 236. (3). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

This interdisciplinary course explores the fascist-era cinemas of Germany, Spain, Italy, and Japan. It focuses on a set of common themes to identify both commonalities and specificities of a given context or historical moment.

SAC/AMCULT 334 Race, Gender, Sexuality, and U.S. Culture in Video Games 

(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines how video games function as a window into U.S. race relations. We will study the history, theory, and practice of video games in the U.S. with particular attention to racial stereotyping, user demographics, diversity of the industry, and racial conflict in shared world and social games.

SAC 335 Authorship & the Archive: Exploring the Film, Theater, & TV Collections of the U of M Special Collections Library

SAC 236 The Art of the Film (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

The University of Michigan Special Collections Library is home to extensive archives and materials documenting the careers of a number of important film and media makers. Students in this course conduct original primary-source archival research using unique materials found in the collections while also viewing and analyzing selected audiovisual works.

SAC 340 Writing Film Criticism

SAC 230 or 236. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is aimed at helping students write illuminating and stylistically engaging film criticism. Students will do this within the context of screening contemporary films and reading various types of critical writing in popular and academic criticism.

SAC 341 / ASIAN 341 Bollywood and Beyond: An Introduction to Popular Indian Cinema

(4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course provides a critical overview of the history, aesthetics, and cultural politics of cinema in India, with a focus on the Hindi film industry of Bombay and its role in the making of modern India. It also introduces students to Indian history and culture through the study of film.

SAC/GERMAN/AMCULT 346 Media Matter: From Print to Screen Culture

(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores the histories of writing, photography, radio, film, television, and the computer in order to gain a firmer understanding of how technology shapes culture, politics, and personal identity in the German-speaking world and beyond.

SAC 350 The Silent Screen: Arts and Cultures

(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

The screening of moving images encompasses a long and fascinating history that begins even before the emergence of cinema. International in scope and intermedial in approach, this course examines the diversity of screen practices that preceded the introduction of synchronized sound at the end of the 1920s.

SAC 352 Film History: Origins to the French New Wave

SAC 236. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course introduces students to the history of cinema from its technological and cultural origins in the late nineteenth century to the global impact of the French New Wave. The objectives are to orient students to a wide range of cinema, establish the relationships between films from different aesthetic, industrial, and national contexts, and illuminate the development of narrative form and film style.

SAC 353 Film History: Post New Wave

SAC 236. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines the development of cinema during a period characterized by significant changes in film form and style as well as by important industrial and technological developments. It considers the international dimensions of these changes as well as their specific national and institutional contexts. The course also addresses questions of historical method in film scholarship and the relevance of this period to current trends in film production and reception.

SAC 354 New Media History

SAC 236. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

The history of new media extends back into the histories of media and technology far deeper than we might first imagine. Computers, software programs, networks and the innovative social, cultural and artistic exchanges and representations that occur through them have emerged from, adapted and re-formed prior media like film and television while also introducing and spreading new kinds of content and experiences across a range of networks and devices. This class looks back at the history of media in order to best understand our present notion of what new media is and how it has come to be. From photography to weaving, radio to television, automobiles to airplanes, we seek to understand how the technologies of the Industrial age are part of the history of our current and future forms of new media.

SAC 355 Television History

SAC 236. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course traces the development of television from the medium's historical, industrial and technological roots in radio to the advent of new audiences, technologies and forms in the 1990s. Addressing television as a global phenomenon, we will investigate televisions institutions, structures, and programming from various perspectives in order to understand television's role in mass culture.

SAC 358 / ITALIAN 358 Italian Film: History, Art, Entertainment

(HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Focusing on the post-WWII period, this course looks at Italian cinema from a number of perspectives: political, commercial, social, and aesthetic.

SAC 361 / WOMENSTD 361 Women and Film

(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

An examination of films made by, for, and about women. Focus is on how societal norms and film language have constructed the representation of women in film and how women have appropriated the medium for self-representation through both narrative and experimental filmmaking.

SAC 365 Race and Ethnicity in Contemporary American Television

SAC 236. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

What forms do racial and ethnic representations take in contemporary American television? How do these representations function politically and culturally? This course will address these questions and consider the racial and ethnic meanings that television produces in relationship to gender and sexual identity, economic consciousness, nationality and notions of "Americanness."

SAC 366 Topics in Film, Television and Popular Culture

(3). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This course addresses the role of film and television as popular media. It emphasizes the acquisition and use of analytical skills relevant to the given topic and serves as an introduction to cultural studies. Students will be taught to read and analyze specific popular films, genres, or figures; at the same time, the course introduces broader issues in cultural studies, such as definitions of popular/mass culture and the 'culture industry', the role of intertextuality, reception or globalization in popular culture, and the function of gender and sexuality in popular culture. Topics may include: James Bond as Popular Hero; Serials in Film and TV; Popular Cinema Beyond Hollywood; Cult Films/Cult Shows.

SAC 367 Introduction to Digital Media Studies

(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course surveys the technologies, representations, and experiences that constitute digital media culture. Course goals are to understand the aesthetic, political, and cultural roles of digital media by reading diverse texts and entering into the debate around new technologies and the ways that we imagine them.

SAC 368. Topics in Digital Media Studies

SAC 367. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This course explores topics relevant to film and video studies and emerging entertainment, communications, and computer technologies. Courses methodologically use critical theory, industry studies, media and cultural studies to analyze digital media representations and experiences. Topics include but are not limited to digital media theory, video games, and virtually and identity.

SAC 372 Contemporary Film Theory

SAC 236. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines approaches to film theory. It explores how different theories and methods of analysis built on structural and post-structural presuppositions and paradigms have influenced recent film theory, its consideration of narrative practice, the psychological experience of viewing, the construction of moving image representations, and the impact of technology on aesthetic practice.

SAC 375 Television Theory and Criticism

SAC 236. (3). (ULWR). May not be repeated for credit.

Introduction to various methodologies in study of commercial television programming; semiotic, linguistic, rhetorical, cultural, etc. Throughout the course, emphasis will be upon inquiry into what television is saying and how messages are represented for mass comprehension.

SAC 376. New Media Theory

SAC 236. (3). (HU). (ULWR). May not be repeated for credit.

This course surveys the major theories of digital media culture from theories of media convergence to "cyberfeminist" analysis of identity politics and accounts of the formal properties of digital media.

SAC 380 / AMCULT 380/ LATINOAM 380 - Studies in Transnational Media

Prior coursework in Screen Arts & Cultures, Communications (TV), or Latino Studies. Knowledge of Spanish is not required. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in English.

Drawing from writings in cultural theory and criticism in both English and Spanish. This course will examine national and transnational trends in Spanish and Portuguese language TV, alternative video and cinema since WW II.

SAC 381 / AMCULT 381/ LATINOAM 381 Latinas/Latinos and the Media

AMCULT 213 or SAC 236 or AMCULT 380/SAC 380 (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines the access and contributions of Latinas/os to the U.S. media from an historical perspective, with a culminating emphasis on the contemporary period. The cultural scope is pan-Latino, covering a range of genres and formats, from documentary to experimental film and television.

SAC 400 Dramatic Narrative II

A 300- (or 400-) level production course in a relevant emphasized area: SAC 300, 301, 302, or 304. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This is an intermediate sync-sound movie production course. It familiarizes students with dramatic narrative (any genre comedy to drama) sync-sound movie production from interpreting the screenplay through sync-sound shooting and post-production. Students have access to high-end production equipment and work in large teams to produce a substantial sync-sound final project. They also participate in dramatic narrative productions in class in collaboration with Theatre and Drama students.

SAC 401 Documentary II

SAC 301, SAC majors only. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This advanced course is designed to teach the theoretical, aesthetic and technical principles of making compelling non-fiction productions. The class includes readings and viewing of clips to investigate current and past issues in non-fiction production that include documentary form, objectivity in documentary production, ethics, and representation.

SAC 402 Television II

SAC 302, SAC majors only. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This is an advanced course in television production focusing on a multi-camera studio or location production. Possible topics may include Situation Comedy or Live Event Production.

SAC 403 Television Sketch Comedy

Permission of Instructor only. May not be repeated for credit.

From television's earliest history, sketch comedy has been an integral part of the television landscape. Through screenings, readings, discussion, guest speakers, and productions. Television Sketch Comedy will explore this perennial form. Students will collaborate on original sketch comedy programs in a variety of forms.

SAC 404 Topics in Media Production II

A 300- (or 400-) level production course in the relevant emphasized area: SAC 300, 301, 302, or 306; or permission of instructor. (1-3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

An advanced course in special production topics that may include film, video, television and/or digital production within a particular subject area and/or approach to the medium. It also may focus on collaborations with other courses or units.

SAC 405 Screendance

Consent of instructor required. A 300 (or 400) level production course in the relevant emphasized area: SAC 300 or 301 and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

From Maya Deren to Merce Cunningham, to music video and beyond, this course will explore the unique challenges of capturing and creating dance for the camera. Through class screenings of film and video work, class exercises, and reading and discussion, students will learn about various historical and contemporary issues and approaches in combining dance and the moving image. Students will work alone and in small collaborative groups to create their own works integrating dance and video. Through creative projects, students will develop their own visual style and an increased proficiency with digital video cameras and editing. This course is an interdisciplinary course that meets with DANCE 462,bringing together 8 dance students and 8 media production students, to explore the intersections of the respective disciplines.

SAC 406 New Media Practices II

SAC 306 or equivalent experience and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This intensive course further explores and builds upon the practices and strategies in SAC 306. Students work individually and in small groups to research new media practice, new software and hardware, and new presentation methods. Rotating topics include: special effects for cinema; audio/visual performance; web-based serial production; and 2D digital animation. Research and seminar-based presentations along with workshops and demonstrations ultimately culminate in the design and production of individual or team-based final projects.

SAC 410 Screenwriting II: The Rewrite

SAC 310 and SAC majors. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course follows SAC 310 as an intermediate course in the art and practice of screenwriting. It stresses creative dramatic writing and focuses on critical tools for rewriting. Each student is expected to write or rewrite a feature length screenplay.

SAC 411 Writing for Television II: Pilots

SAC 311. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) SAC 290 and 310. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course offers students who have succeeded in SAC 311 the opportunity to conceive and develop their own hour-long television program, from the creation of a "show bible" to the completion of a full-length spec script of the pilot episode.

SAC 422 Topics in Avant-Garde Film

SAC 236. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Historical and theoretical studies of topics in avant-garde film and video. The class examines the cultural contexts of the firms as well as their formal innovations.

SAC 423 Practicum for the Screenwriter

SAC 290, 310, and 410. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Permission of instructor.

This course is a writing practicum in which students will learn the role of the screenwriter in the greater production process. Students will participate in the various creative steps involved in bringing a script to the screen. Topics may include Dramatic Narrative and Sketch Comedy.

SAC 427 Screenwriting III

SAC 310 and 410. Limited to students whose work is judged as showing outstanding potential in writing for the screen. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

An advanced screenwriting course that provides individual and small group instruction to select students who have completed basic (SAC 310) and intermediate (SAC 410) screenwriting. Students will write a final draft of a revised original screenplay (see SAC 410) and a first draft of a new screenplay.

SAC 440 / AAS 440 African Cinema

AAS 200. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

A critical and interdisciplinary look at the development of African cinema from its inception in the 1960s, at the height of the sociopolitical upheavals experienced by many nations in the transition from colonialism to independence, to the recent phase of introspection and diversification.

SAC 441 National Screens

SAC 236 or 360. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

An in-depth exploration of the evolution and forms of specific national or regional cinema in terms of its stylistic, socio-political, economic, and technological dimensions. Close study of the development of a cinema (e.g. Japanese, Eastern European, British) or of a film movement, e.g., Italian Neorealism, German Expressionism, French New Wave.

SAC 442 / AAS 442 Third World Cinema

AAS 202 or SAC 236. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

The interrelationships and disruptions between dominant cinema practices and Third World and marginal cinema on the level of aesthetics, production, economic, social and cultural history. Cinema as ideological practice: the formulation of new approaches to film practice sympathetic to the cultural specifications of the producing nations.

SAC 451 / AMCULT 490 American Film Genres

Junior standing. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

The development of American film genres as a popular art form, considered within the broad context of American cultural development since the late nineteenth century.

SAC 455 Topics in Film Studies

SAC 236. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Studies in various film topics, such as silent film, women and film, German Expressionism, and Latin-American film.

SAC/ASIAN 458 Korean Film Culture

May not be repeated for credit.

This course will explore the history of Korean cinema through the framework of national/transnational cinema discourse, auteur/genre theory, globalization, the division system, and the problem of nation/state which evokes the question of identity. Students will learn Korean cinema through key films, directors, and dominant genres.

SAC 460 Technology and the Moving Image

SAC 236. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course traces the impact of such technological innovations as sound, color, and wide screen on the history of the motion picture and the evolution beyond cinema of the new digital technology, virtual reality, and multi-media performances. This class examines the aesthetics of technology and the ways in which technology through art influences individual psychology and society at large.

SAC 461 / WOMENSTD 461 Explorations in Feminist Film Theory

WOMENSTD 240 or AMCULT 240; and junior standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course offers an in-depth exploration of feminist theories that address film in relation to gender. Discussion focuses on contemporary feminist scholarship that draws upon a variety of viewpoints, including psychoanalysis, cultural theory, postmodernism, historical research and ideological theory.

SAC 475 Popular Film and TV Culture 

(3). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

An upper-level introduction to critical theory and cultural studies of popular film and television, drawn from theoretical traditions including the Frankfurt School, Marxism, feminism, post-colonialism, post-structuralism, and critical race studies.

SAC 480 Internship

Consent of instructor required. (2). (EXPERIENTIAL).

May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term. Pass/Fail with Narrative Evaluation.

SAC 485 The Global Screen

Junior or Above. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) Junior standing; SAC 236. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Explores the impact of global trade and cultural exchange on audiovisual media during different periods in media history. Topics rotate. Possible topics include international film co- productions, censorship and state regulation, the transnational transmission of television, and translation and the politics of reception.

SAC 490 Senior Honors Research

Consent of instructor required. SAC majors only. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 4 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Candidates work independently on a written thesis or on a media production project under supervision of SAC faculty.

SAC 495 Senior Honors Seminar

Consent of instructor required. SAC majors/Honors students only.

This is a year-long (fall and winter terms) workshop led by a faculty member which includes all seniors writing Honors theses or completing Honors production projects. Although the theses or production project is completed primarily under the guidance of the faculty advisor, students assist one another with projects in the workshop by sharing experiences, advice, interests, and, ultimately, portions of their theses. Theses projects are evaluated by the advisor and one or more other faculty, on the basis of the quality of the research, analysis, and writing (theses). Production projects should demonstrate a strong command of organizational, technical, and/or creative skills such as scriptwriting, cinematography/videography, lighting, direction, audio construction, and/or editing. The letter grade for SAC 495 and the level of Honors with which the student will be graduated (i.e., "Honors," "High Honors," "Highest Honors") are based on the evaluations of the thesis or production project.

SAC 499 Independent Study

Consent of instructor required. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Independent study on a subject to be determined by student in conjunction with a faculty member. Does not count toward major requirements. Must be approved by Department in term prior to enrollment. In exceptional cases, students can petition for enrollment during current term.

SAC 500 Directed Study in Screen Arts and Cultures

Consent of instructor required. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Directed Study on a subject to be determined by student in conjunction with a faculty member. Does not count toward major requirements. Must be approved by Department in term prior to enrollment. In exceptional cases, students can petition for enrollment during current term.

Screen Arts and Cultures (SAC) Waitlist Policy:

  • Students who wish to obtain an override, must get permission from the instructor of the course.
  • Screen Arts and Cultures (SAC) majors will be given preference on the waitlist over non-SAC students.
  • Waitlist priority will be at the discretion of the instructor.
  • If a student does not use the class permission before it expires, the next student chosen by the instructor will be given permission.

It is critical that students attend classes from the beginning of the term. The department may drop a student from a course if the student does not attend the first course meeting. If a student plans to miss the first course meeting, arrangements must be APPROVED by the instructor in ADVANCE.