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Ford Distinguished Lecture

Dr. H. Eugene Stanley

William Fairfield Warren Distinguished Professor;
Director, Center for Polymer Studies;
Professor of Physics, Chemistry, Biomedical
Engineering, and Physiology (School of Medicine)
Boston University

Are There Two Forms of Liquid Water?
Wednesday, March 23, 2016 at 4:15 PM
Askwith Auditorium, 140 Lorch Hall
(611 Tappan Street)
University of Michigan Central Campus

Lecture Abstract:

Dr. H. Eugene Stanley will introduce some of the 73 documented anomalies of the most complex of liquids, water—focusing on recent progress in understanding these anomalies by combining information provided by recent experiments and simulations on water designed to test the hypothesis that liquid water has behavior consistent with the novel phenomenon of “liquid polymorphism” in that water can exist in two distinct phases. He will also discuss very recent work on nanoconfined water anomalies as well as the apparently related, and highly unusual, behavior of water in biological environments. Finally, Dr. Stanley will discuss how the general concept of liquid polymorphism is proving useful in understanding anomalies in other liquids, such as silicon and silica, as well as metallic glasses, which have in common that they are characterized by two characteristic length scales in their interactions.

Speaker Biography:

Harry Eugene Stanley (born March 28, 1941) is an American physicist and University Professor at Boston University. He has made seminal contributions to statistical physics and is one of the pioneers of interdisciplinary science. His current research focuses on understanding the anomalous behavior of liquid water, but he had made fundamental contributions to complex systems, such as quantifying correlations among the constituents of the Alzheimer brain, and quantifying fluctuations in noncoding and coding DNA sequences, interbeat intervals of the healthy and diseased heart. He is one of the founding fathers of econophysics.

View more information about Dr. H. Eugene Stanley on his webpage.

Previous lectures in this series: