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100-Level Math Courses

Math 105 - Data, Functions, and Graphs

Prerequisites: 3-4 years HS math including trigonometry  
Credit: 4 Credits. No credit granted to those who have completed and mathematics course numbered 110 or higher. A maximum of four credits may be earned in Math 105 and 110
 
Background and Goals:
Math 105 serves both as a preparatory class to the calculus sequences and as a class for students who are interested in strengthening their math skills. Students who successfully complete 105 are fully prepared for Math 115.  
Content: This course presents concepts from four points of view: geometric (graphs), numeric (tables), symbolic (formulas), and written (verbal descriptions). The emphasis is on the mathematical modeling of real-life problems using linear, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. Students develop their reading, writing, and questioning skills in an interactive class- room setting.  

Math 110 - Pre Calculus (Self-Paced)

Prerequisites: 3-4 years HS math
 
Credit: 2 Credits.  No credit granted to those who have completed any Mathematics course numbered 110 or higher. A maximum of four credits may be earned in Math 105 and 110.  
Background and Goals:
Math 110 is a condensed, half-term version of Math 105 designed specifically to prepare students for Math 115.  It is open only to students who have enrolled in Math 115 and whose performance on the first uniform examination indicates that they will have diffi culty completing that course successfully. This self-study course begins shortly after the fi rst uniform examination in Math 115 and is completed under the guidance of an instructor without regular classroom meetings. Students must receive permission from the Math 115 Course Director or other designated representative to enroll in the course, and they must visit the Math Lab as soon as possible after enrolling to receive printed course information.  Enrollment opens the day after the first Math 115 uniform examination, and enrollment must be completed by the Friday of the following week.    
Content: The course is a condensed, half-term version of Math 105 designed for students who appear to be prepared to handle calculus but are not able to successfully complete Math 115.  Students may enroll in Math 110 only on the recommendation of a mathematics instructor after the third week of classes in the Fall and must visit the Math Lab to complete paperwork and receive course materials. The course covers data analysis by means of functions and graphs.  

Math 115 - Calculus I

Prerequisites: 3-4 years HS Math including trigonometry  
Credit: 4 Credits: No gredit for students who have completed or are enrolled in Math 116, 185, 215, or 216  
Background and Goals: The sequence Math 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given two uniform midterms and a final exam.  
Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from four points of view: geometric (graphs), numeric (tables), symbolic (formulas), and verbal descriptions. Students will develop their reading, writing, and questioning skills, as well as their ability to work cooperatively. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and an introduction to integration. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative. Both individual and team homework is assigned.  

Math 116 - Calculus II

Prerequisites Math 115 or AP Credit  
Credit: 4 Credits. No credit for students who have completed or are enrolled in Math 156, 176, 186, 215, 216, 285, or 286
 
Background and Goals: The sequence Math 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given two uniform midterms and a final exam.  
Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from four points of view: geometric (graphs), numeric (tables), symbolic (formulas), and verbal descriptions. Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills, as well as their ability to work cooperatively. Topics include techniques of integration, applications of integration, Taylor series, an introduction to differential equations, and infinite series. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative. Both individual and team homework is assigned.  

Math 128 - Explorations in Number Theory

Prerequisites: 3 years HS math  
Credit:
4 Credits. No credit after completeing any 200+ level amth course, except 385, 485, 489, and 497.
 
Background and Goals: This course is intended for students who want to engage in mathematical reasoning without having to take calculus first. It is particularly well-suited for non-science majors or those who are thoroughly undecided. Students will make use of software to conduct numerical experiments and to make empirical discoveries. Students will formulate precise conjectures and in many cases prove them. Thus the students will, as a group, generate a logical development of the subject.  
Content: After studying factorizations and greatest common divisors, emphasis will shift to the patterns that emerge when the integers are classified according to the remainder produced upon division by some fixed number (congruences).  Once some basic tools have been established, applications will be made in several directions. For example, students may derive a precise parameterization of Pythagorean triples.  

Math 145 - Houghton Scholars Calculus Worskhop I

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in Math 115 and permission of instructor  
Credit: 2 Credits.  
Background and Goals: This course is an intensive supplemental workshop experience for students in the Douglas Houghton Scholars Program.  In a small-class setting, students work in small groups on problems more challenging than those in the regular section of Math 115. The goal is to develop the student's problem-solving capabilities and promote their interest in challenging problems.  
Content: The workshop follows the structure of Math 115. Content includes geometric (graphs), numeric (tables), symbolic (formulas), and verbal descriptions. Students will develop their reading, writing, and questioning skills, as well as their ability to work cooperatively. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and an introduction to integration.  

Math 146 - Houghton Scholars Calculus Workshop II

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in Math 116 and permission of instructor  
Credit: 2 Credits.
 
Background and Goals: This course is an intensive supplemental workshop experience for students in the Douglas Houghton Scholars Program.  In a small-class setting, students work in small groups on problems more challenging than those in the regular section of Math 116. The goal is to develop the students' problem-solving capabilities and promote their interest in challenging problems.  
Content: The workshop follows the structure of Math 116 (Calc II). Content includes geometric (graphs), numeric (tables), symbolic (formulas), and verbal descriptions. Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills, as well as their ability to work cooperatively. Topics include techniques of integration, applications of integration, Taylor series, an introduction to differential equations, and infinite series.  

Math 147 - Introduction to Interest Theory

Prerequisites: Math 115  
Credit: 3 Credits. No credit after completing any 200+ level math course, except 385, 485, 489, or 497.
 
Background and Goals:
This course is designed for students who seek an introduction to the mathematical concepts and techniques employed by financial institutions such as banks, insurance companies, and pension funds. Actuarial students, and other mathematics majors, should elect Math 424 which covers the same topics but on a more rigorous basis requiring considerable use of calculus. The course is not part of a sequence. Students should possess financial calculators.  
Content: Topics covered include: various rates of simple and compound interest, present and accumulated values based on these; annuity functions and their application to amortization, sinking funds, and bond values; depreciation methods; introduction to life tables, life annuity, and life insurance values.  

Math 156 - Applied Honors Calculus II

Prerequisites:
Score of 4 or 5 on Advanced Placement AB or BC Calculus exam
 
Credit: 4 Credits. Credit is granted for either 116 or 156, but not both.
 
Background and Goals: Math 156 is part of the applied honors calculus sequence for engineering and science majors. The course is an alternative to Math 116 for students with strong mathematical ability. Applications and concepts receive equal treatment. Theorems are stated precisely and are derived, but technical details are omitted. Examples are given to illustrate the theory.  Critical thinking and class participation are encouraged. The goal is to provide students with the solid background needed for subsequent courses in mathematics, engineering, and science.    
Content: Riemann sums, definite integral, fundamental theorem of calculus, applications of integral calculus (e.g. arclength, surface area, work, center of mass, probability density functions), improper integrals, infinite sequences and series, geometric series, alternating series, power series, Taylor series, differential equations, complex numbers. Students are introduced to MAPLE.  

Math 175 - Introduction to Cryptology

Prerequisites: Permission of honors math advisor  
Credit: 4 Credits. No credit granted to those who have completed a 200-level or higher Mathematics course other that 385 or 489.
 
Background and Goals:
This course is an alternative to Math 185 as an entry to the honors calculus sequence. The course stresses discovery as a vehicle for learning.  Students will be required to experiment throughout the course on a range of problems and will participate each semester in a group project.  Grades will be based on homework and projects, with a strong emphasis on homework. Personal computers will be a valuable experimental tool in this course and students will be asked to learn to program in one of BASIC, PASCAL, or FORTRAN.  
Content: This course gives a historical introduction to Cryptology, from ancient times up to modern public key encryption, particularly RSA, and introduces a number of mathematical ideas involved in the development and analysisof codes. Mathematical topics include some enumeration, probability, and statistics, but the bulk of the course is devoted to elementary number theory. Students also work throughout the course on effectively communicating mathematics, both written and orally. Moreover, students will develop rigorous mathematical proof writing skills, and a primary goal of the course is to not only understand how various cryptosystems work, but why.  

Math 176 - Explorations in Calculus

Prerequisites: Background in calculus is usggested; highly recommended for students who have taken Math 175
 
Credit: 4 Credits. Credit is granted for either Math 176 or 186, but not both
 
Background and Goals:
This course is an Inquiry-Based version of Honors Calculus I and II (such as Math 185/186) and provides the necessary preparation for Multivariable Calculus (Math 215 or the honors version, Math 285). A student who has had some exposure to calculus (e.g., AB or BC in high school, or Math 115) will be well-prepared for this course. The majority of class time will be spent working in groups and presenting ideas and solutions to problems.  
Content: This is a calculus course from a theoretical perspective.  Students will study concepts like continuity, derivatives, and integrals, as well as investigate some of the properties of the real numbers that make these things work.  

Math 185 - Honors Calculus I

Prerequisites: Permission of honors advisor during orientation  
Credit: 4 Credits.
 
Background and Goals:
Most students take calculus in high school, and it may seem that there isn't much new to learn. The goal of this course is to develop the familiar concepts of calculus using a more rigorous and theoretical approach. In particular, with its emphasis on how to use appropriate mathematical language, this course lays a solid foundation for future math courses, and is suitable for students intending to pursue a major in mathematics, science, or engineering who desire a more complete understanding of the underpinnings of calculus. This sequence is not restricted to students enrolled in the LSA Honors Program.  
Content: Topics covered include functions, graphs, continuity, limits, derivatives, and integrals. Tuesday meetings are usually devoted to introducing linear algebra.  

Math 186 - Honors Calculus II

Prerequisites: Permission of honors advisor or Math 185
Credit: 4 Credits
Background and Goals:
Most students take calculus in high school, and it may seem that there isn't much new to learn. The goal of this course is to develop the familiar concepts of calculus using a more rigorous and theoretical approach. In particular, with its emphasis on how to use appropriate mathematical language, this course lays a solid foundation for future math courses, and is suitable for students intending to pursue a major in mathematics, science, or engineering who desire a more complete understanding of the underpinnings of calculus. This sequence is not restricted to students enrolled in the LSA Honors Program. This course is a continuation of Math 185.
Content: Topics include integral calculus, transcendental functions, infinite sequences and series (including Taylor’s series), and *time permitting* some simple applications to elementary differential equations. Tuesdays are mostly devoted to an introduction to linear algebra.