The East Isthmia Archaeology Project is investigating a series of buildings attached to the famous Greek sanctuary of Isthmia, near Ancient Corinth. The precise area was first described by the mid 2nd century travel writer, Pausanias, who told of a street lined with the portrait statues of successful athletes from the Isthmian Games; it was for these statues that the area was first excavated in 1970. The sculptures were never found. Instead, a virtual labyrinth of buildings that were perhaps used in the everyday running of the sanctuary, or in accommodating the many visitors. Since their first discovery, however, the actual functions of these buildings have remained tantalizingly elusive. In spite of the patent importance of these spaces and associated activities to the operation of the sanctuary, the walls themselves have yet been comprehensively delineated into recognizable buildings. Equally, very little is known of how such spaces in Greek sanctuaries changed over time, particularly from their early Classical Greek heritage through to the later Roman periods. Through a systematic investigation of the archaeological remains, our Project intends to develop a more complete understanding of the social infrastructure for the Greek sanctuary at Isthmia and its relationship to the surrounding built and natural environment.