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Former Fellows

2015-16

Andrea Brock
Sylvia “Duffy” Engle Graduate Student Fellow

“Environment and Urban Development in the Archaic Forum Boarium in Rome, Italy”

This project is aimed at evaluating the role played by environmental threats and human response in Rome during the eight-sixth centuries BCE. This period relates to early processes of urban development in central Italy and the birth of Roman culture. Specifically, this dissertation is focused on the Forum Boarium valley, which not only served as the setting for Rome’s earliest river harbor, but also for one of the first monumental temples built in the city. Despite the region’s prominent position in commercial and ritual life, floodwaters would have devastated any activity in the valley on an annual basis. This daunting environmental challenge led the Romans to pursue early attempts at landscape modification and flood mitigation. By utilizing a combination of archaeological, historical, and environmental data, this project aims to reconstruct the natural environment of Rome’s dynamic river valley and elucidate the human response to environmental stress during the early centuries of urban growth.

Michelle Cassidy
A. Bartlett Giamatti Scholar/Graduate Student Fellows

“Both the Honor and the Profit: Anishinaabe Warriors, Soldiers, and Veterans from Pontiac’s War through the Civil War”

From 1863 to 1865, 136 Anishinaabe men served in Company K of the First Michigan Sharpshooters. In order to understand why these Odawa, Ojibwe, and Potawatomi men fought in the Civil War, this project examines changes in Anishinaabe masculinity, leadership, and status from Pontiac’s War (1763) through the 1890s. Military records, missionary correspondence, and battlefield memoirs suggest that many Anishinaabe soldiers used Christianity, as well as military service, to acquire or sustain leadership positions and preserve rights to land. They claimed the rights and responsibilities of male citizenship while also actively preserving their status as Indians and Anishinaabe peoples. This history complicates the binary of black and white racial categories that dominates many discussions of the Civil War and citizenship, while also stressing the diversity of Indian country during a period dominated by Indian removal and reservations.

Andreas Gailus

Helmut F. Stern Fellow; associate professor, Germanic languages and literatures

“Forms of Life”

The notion of “life” has become a focal point of study and dispute in diverse fields, from political theory to ethics, and from animal studies to aesthetics. Gailus’ work engages these contemporary debates by way of an historical detour. It explores the rich discourse of life in German literature, philosophy and politics from the a late 18th to the mid-20th century, analyzing, in particular, its sustained attention to questions of form and formation. Part historical study, part philosophical essay, the work seeks to develop a vocabulary that helps us articulate the many lives—biological and biographical, political and psychical, aesthetic and ethical—that we live and are.

Phoebe Gloeckner
Richard and Lillian A. Ives Fellow; associate professor, art and design

“The Return of Maldoror”

The aim of this project is to create a hybrid prose/graphic novel based on nearly a decade of experiential research in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico and the US-Mexico border region. This span of time included several years where cartel violence made Juarez "the most dangerous city in the world." Gloeckner is constructing scale models of Anapra, a colonia in the northwestern extreme of Juárez. Jointed handmade dolls populate the highly detailed sets to create hyperreal images, some of which will be animated in an electronic version of the book.

Christiane Gruber
Charles P. Brauer Fellow; associate professor, history of art

In her book, Gruber explores how individuals experience and perform political dissent and war in a contemporary Middle Eastern context. It focuses in particular on the Turkish Gezi Resistance Movement, which created an array of powerful self-images and creative forms of dissent during Summer 2013. “Gezi Graffiti” is rooted in multiple disciplines, most especially art history, visual culture, media, museum, and memory studies, sociology, and anthropology. It utilizes a range of methodological and theoretical approaches drawn from these various disciplines within the humanities in order to pose a number of critical questions about the dynamic role and power images play in the social, cultural, and political conflicts unfolding in Turkey today.

Gabrielle Hecht
Mary I. and David D. Hunting Family Fellow; professor, history

 “Toxic Tales from the African Anthropocene”

The Anthropocene signals a new epoch in which human activity shapes geophysical processes on a planetary scale. The term’s remarkable resonance has made it a rallying point for interdisciplinarity across the humanities, arts, and natural and social sciences. Yet these conversations easily falter, especially when critics observe that the notion can obscure massive inequalities by attributing the unfolding planetary catastrophes to an undifferentiated “humanity.” How can humanists theorize temporal and spatial scales that hold the planetary and the particular in the same frame? How can they gain purchase on the nexus of waste, toxicity, and violence that forms the core of the Anthropocene? In tackling these questions, Hecht’s new project explores material histories of toxic waste in and beyond Africa.

Lizzie Hutton
James A. Winn Graduate Student Fellow

 “New Reasons for Reading: Progressive Experiments in Cultural and Literary Literacy”

This project argues for a refreshed view of the composition-literature divide that structures most post-secondary departments of English in America. Returning to the interwar period, Hutton consolidates a milieu of disciplinarily permeable thinkers who encouraged alternative models for a critically sophisticated higher education in literacy, literature, and the reading of culture. Through the early, transatlantic career of the reading theorist Louise Rosenblatt, an ongoing conversation is charted between her work and Boasian anthropology; interwar French historicism and comparatism; Dewey’s philosophies of education, experience and culture; and I.A. Richards’s experiments in criticism, rhetoric, and psycholinguistics. Hutton poses the question: How might this recovered moment inspire us to rethink our long-held assumptions about how and why literacy and literature ought to be taught at the college level?

Yanay Israeli
Early Modern Conversions Graduate Fellow

 “Negotiating the Republic: Violence, Propaganda, and Government in Castillian Cities, 1391-1520”

This project explores the relations between emerging republican discourses, social conflicts and administrative practices in late medieval and early modern Spain. Drawing on extensive archival materials—administrative correspondence, municipal records, petitions, and judicial inquiries and testimonies—Israeli’s work examines how different Spaniards appropriated concepts such as “the common good,” “good government,” and “tyranny” to make various political claims, mobilize collective action, and legitimize forms of violence and authority. Analyzing the political language that informed phenomena such as urban protest and revolt, the growing of central administration, the structuring of public spaces in cities, or the eruption of violence against ethnic and religious minorities, this project proposes the struggles over the meanings of republican concepts as a new perspective from which to examine the history of Spain in a period of significant social and cultural transformations.

Lavrentia Karamaniola
Marc and Constance Jacobson Graduate Fellow

 “Bucharest Barks: Stray Dogs, Urban Lifestyle Aspirations, and the ‘Non-Civilized’ City”

This dissertation shows how Bucharest’s stray dogs are related to post-socialist class formation, to the mechanisms that produce marginalization, and to patterns of urban inhabitance and management. The objectives are to analyze how these domains intersect with discourses about compassion and morality, with ideas of responsible citizenship and animal rights, and with practices relating to the expulsion of marginal populations from the city. Karamaniola works through ethnographic and archival data gathered in urban neighborhoods, public and private dog shelters, protests against and for euthanasia, a vet clinic, and two different archives. Semiotic and post-humanist theories to study marginalization are deployed, and the urban environment as an assemblage of humans, animals, and materials is analyzed. The dissertation will show how the study of stray dogs illuminates patterns of social change and continuity, and how people’s urban lifestyle aspirations promotes the understanding of post-socialist class formation, and of political economy change.

Katie Lennard
Mary I. and David D. Hunting Family Graduate Student Fellow

“Made in America: Costume, Violence, and the Ku Klux Klan, 1905-1940”

In the first half of the twentieth century, millions of men across the United States donned white uniform robes that designated their affiliation with the Ku Klux Klan. This organization was dedicated to ensuring the supremacy of "native born," white, heterosexual, Protestant men, and these garments were strategically created to be visual and material representations of this ideological project. This project is a cultural history of the design and industrial manufacture of these garments in a series of Atlanta fraternal supply factories, as well as the national distribution, use, and maintenance of these garments. I trace these processes through archival research with documents, images, and garments in order to better understand how Klan leaders and members alike dressed up racial violence for twentieth century Americans by using the modern tools of consumer mass culture.

Arvind-Pal Mandair
Helmut F. Stern Fellow; associate professor, Asian languages and cultures

 “Untimely Encounters”

This book will explore ways of engaging Western and Indian thought that go beyond conventional techniques of reasoning deployed in comparative philosophy, literature and religion, which often remain entangled in representational logics. The preferred concept for the engagement Mandair pursues is “encounter,” although a more formal name for it might be “disjunctive synthesis” – a term which appears in Deleuze’s early philosophy, but which is very much akin to poetic critiques of self-production that appear in the writings of the medieval Indian poets Mandair is working with. “Disjunctive synthesis” or critique of self-production are therefore modes of encounter. One is essentially philosophical, the other poetic, but each in its own way enables the association of two or more series (concepts, cultures, persons, events, etc.) that may have no historical or geographical connection, but which can nevertheless belong together without one being reduced to the other. Mandair sees this project as a form of conceptual experimentation that may be helpful for thinking about spheres of existence that routinely bring into heterological association different languages, traditions, modes of thought, and time-periods (premodern/modern). In this way the book project joins contemporary efforts to rethink the nature of colonial diasporas.

Shana Melnysyn
Mary I. and David D. Hunting Family Graduate Student Fellow

"Rum & Revenge: Portuguese-Angolan Trade and the Bailundo Revolt of 1902"

This project is an anthropological history of an uprising against Portugal, during its colonial invasion of Angola (southwest Africa). In 1902, the Bailundo Kingdom refused to recognize Portuguese authority. Bailundo people began attacking rum traders and plundering commercial goods, and violence spread across the region. The revolt followed a decades-long pattern of continuous anticolonial resistance throughout Angola. European settlers, seeking fortunes in trade, were threatening local people’s lands, possessions, and autonomy with increasing frequency and brutality. Portuguese officials lamented their own ineffectiveness, often admitting that Angolans had legitimate grievances against traders. In this laboratory of unregulated capitalism, traders enforced a twisted version of justice in remote areas where they were sometimes the only face of colonialism, sparking widespread moral anxiety about power and authority. Using oral history interviews and diverse archival sources, this work explores in detail the cultural (mis)understandings and conflicts that marked this time of rapid social change.

Farina Mir
Norman and Jane Katz Fellow; associate professor, history

 “Producing Modern Muslims: Everyday Ethics in Colonial India”

This book is a study of Urdu-language akhlaq (ethics) literature published in colonial India, in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Akhlaq literature, while essential to Muslim high theological discourse, had also become a popular site for exploring questions of everyday ethics in colonial India. The broader aims for the project are to deepen our understanding of how Muslims developed modern forms of subjectivity that included negotiating the relationship between Islam and the secular. While popular representations of Islam would lead one to believe that secular and Muslin forms of subjectivity are paradoxical, if not antithetical to one another, the history of Islam is modern South Asia (and elsewhere) suggests otherwise. But the relationship between the two—Islam and secularity—and a deep understanding of the constitution and historical development of a subjectivity that could be described as that of a “secular Muslim” still eludes us.

Mireille Roddier
Steelcase Professor; associate professor, architecture

 “Tactical Urbanism: The Politics of Interventionist Practices”

Recent architectural discourse upon shrinking cities and economically disinvested sites is divided between two poles. On one hand is design work that directly addresses the political circumstances of the people and places it engages, and on the other are opportunistic practices that exploit the potential of these “over-looked” and under-funded areas to provide venues for self-referential creative endeavors. This project examines the schism between “spontaneous interventions” as “design actions for the common good” and “unsolicited architecture” as an independent practice able to recoup the political agency of architectural autonomy. Through an in-depth study of these interventions, their relationship to authorship, dependence upon the aesthetics of blight, capitalization by the curatorial agendas of cultural institutions, and alleged role in urban gentrification, the project seeks ways to relate the immediate circumstances of specific locales to socio-economic trends at large and emergent aesthetic practices.

Sarah Suhadolnik
Richard and Lillian A. Ives Graduate Fellow

 “Navigating Jazz: Music, Place, and New Orleans in the Twentieth Century”

A new method of understanding how ideas of and about place intersect with and influence musical life is introduced in this dissertation. Designed to traverse the rich musical terrain of New Orleans jazz over the last century, the project addresses place in music as a form of “navigation,” a creative act of cultural negotiation. A variety of artistic responses to the city are examined in relation to the ongoing cultural construction of prominent New Orleans musical landmarks—specifically Congo Square, Basin Street, The French Quarter, and Tremé—tackling New Orleans as a complex intermingling of sound, terrain, worldview, and artistic imagination acting upon popular conceptions of jazz. The approach meshes the work of cultural geography with musicological analysis of works by Wynton Marsalis, Troy “Trombone Shorty” Andrews, The Preservation Hall Jazz Band, and more to reconceive notions of musical place—often presumed to be static, predictable, and historically fixed—as fluid, dynamic, and continually contested.

Megan Sweeney
John Rich Fellow; associate professor, English language and literature, Afroamerican and African studies

“Mendings”

Interweaving personal reflection and interviews with a range of artists, “Mendings” explores the roles that clothing, fabric, and fiber arts play in constituting identities, relationships, communities, and histories. Sweeney is particularly interested in the act of mending as a framework for understanding individual and collective efforts to wrest meaning and beauty from legacies of loss and violence. “Mendings” is divided into two sections: “Selvedge” and “Salvage.” Evoking the roles that clothing and fabric play in defining the borders of the body and in maintaining the boundaries of the self, “Selvedge” addresses questions such as the following: Why and how do some children turn to self-adornment as a strategy for surviving challenging or traumatic experiences? How does clothing serve as a tool for negotiating complex power dynamics within families? What might some girls’ and women’s engagements with clothing reveal about their efforts to navigate the complicated terrains of embodiment, sexuality, self-care, and pleasure? “Salvage”—evoking nineteenth-century rag-and-bone men’s practice of searching for useful refuse—explores a series of questions related to mending: How does a tool for survival become a life-sustaining passion? What is artistic passion, and how does it differ from addiction? How do creative practices related to fiber and clothing enable individuals to reclaim life-affirming aspects of relationships and histories marked by brokenness and violence? How might such practices—including repurposing, mending, knitting, quilting, curating, and gifting—function as embodied forms of epistemology or metaphors for living? Finally, how might the concept of mending complicate reductive accounts of the therapeutic potential of storytelling and art-making?

Emily Waples
Mary Fair Croushore Graduate Fellow

 “Vitiated Nature: Heredity, Environment, and the American Etiological Imagination, 1785-1875”

Approaching medicine and literature as mutually imaginative domains, this dissertation examines the preoccupation with physical degeneration and the concomitant promotion of self-care as a civic duty in the nineteenth-century United States. In particular, it explores how, prior to the rise of genetics and microbiology in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries, American domestic and public health literature and contemporary Gothic, abolitionist, and sentimental fiction conceptualized heredity and environment as reciprocally implicated mechanisms of pathological transmission. Considering intersections of disease, race, and sex in nineteenth-century medical and literary texts, it illustrates the ways in which American authors differently theorized the coaction of hereditary and environmental variables in an effort to predict and prevent the declension of the body politic. Ultimately, through an analysis of the prognostic and prophylactic imperatives in the biopolitical discourses of the antebellum era, this project proposes an interdisciplinary approach to the kinds of interpretive and therapeutic practices that continue to inform understandings of health in our own historical moment.

2014 - 2015

Sara Ahbel-Rappe
John Rich Professor  

Alison Cornish
Mary I. and David D. Hunting Family Fellow

Maria Eugenia Cotera
Helmut F. Stern Fellow

David Green
James Winn Graduate Student Fellow

Holly Hughes
Norman and Jane Katz Fellow

Alison Joersz
Mary I. & David D. Huntington Graduate Student Fellow

Elizabeth Keslacy
A. Bartlett Giamatti Graduate Student Fellow

Nancy Linthicum
Marc and Constance Jacobson Graduate Student Fellow

Sarah Linwick
Early Modern Conversions Graduate Student Fellow

Pascal Massinon
Mary Fair Croushore Graduate Student Fellow

Rostom Mesli
Sylvia "Duffy" Engle Graduate Student Fellow

Rachel Neis
Richard & Lillian Ives Professor 2506 Haven Hall

Asaf Peres
Richard & Lillian Ives Graduate Student Fellow

Christian Sandvig
Steelcase Research Professor

Tobin Siebers
John Rich Professor

Bonnie Washick
Mary I. & David D. Huntington Graduate Student Fellow

Melanie R Yergeau
Charles P. Brauer Fellow

Wang Zheng
Helmut F. Stern Fellow
 

2013 - 2014

Kerstin Barndt
Helmut F. Stern

Mark Clague
U-M Humanities Institute National Edowment for the Humanities Fellow

Deirdre de la Cruz
Richard and Lillian Ives Fellow

Katherine French
Helmut F. Stern Professor

Joshua Friedman
Richard and Lillian Ives Graduate Student Fellow

Maria Hadjipolycarpou
James A. Winn Graduate Student Fellow

Jarrod Hayes
Steelcase Research Professor

Jennifer Lee Johnson
Richard and Lillian Ives Graduate Student Fellow

Monique Johnson
James A. Winn Graduate Student Fellow

Webb Keane
John Rich Professor

Scott Richard Lyons
Hunting Family Fellow

Michael Patrick McCulloch
Mary Fair Croushore Graduate Student Fellow

Janie Paul
John Rich Professor

Richard Pierre
Sylvia "Duffy" Engle Graduate Student Fellow

Elizabeth Sears
Hunting Family Fellow

Brian Whitener
Mary Fair Croushore Graduate Student Fellow

Cookie Woolner
Mary I. & David D. Hunting Graduate Student Fellow
 

2012 - 2013

Adam Ashforth
Helmut F. Stern Professor

A. Sheree Brown
A. Bartlett Giamatti Graduate Student Fellow

Basak Candar
Mary I. and David D. Hunting Graduate Student Fellow

Kathleen Canning
Helmut F. Stern Professor

Alison DeSimone
James A. Winn Graduate Student Fellow

Frieda Ekotto
Chair of DAAS, Professor of French

Candice Hamelin
Sylvia "Duffy" Engle Graduate Student Fellow

Sara Jackson
Mary Fair Croushore Graduate Student Fellow

Karla Mallette
Helmut F. Stern Professor 4010 MLB

David Manley
Norman and Jane Katz Faculty Fellow 2224 AH

Pedro Monaville
Mary Fair Croushore Graduate Student Fellow

Rebecca Porte
Mary I. & David D. Hunting Graduate Student Fellow

Douglas Trevor
dtrevor@umich.edu

Brendan Wright
Marc and Constance Jacobson Graduate Student Fellow

Jason Young
Helmut F. Stern Professor

Geneviève Zubrzycki
Steelcase Research Professor
 

2011 - 2012

Kathryn Babayan
Hunting Family Professor

Marlyse Baptista
Hunting Family Professor

Efrat Bloom
Marc and Constance Jacobson Graduate Student Fellow

Jennifer Finn

Noah Gardiner
Mary Fair Croushore Graduate Student Fellow

Recep Gul
James A. Winn Graduate Student Fellow

Daniel Hack
John Rich Professor

Sarah Hillewaert
Sylvia “Duffy” Engle Graduate Student Fellow

Amr Kamal
Mary Fair Croushore Graduate Student Fellow

Joan Kee
Helmut F. Stern Professor

Matthew Lassiter
Associate Professor

Artemis Leontis
Hunting Family Professor

David Porter
Helmut F. Stern Professor

Sean Silver
Helmut F. Stern Professor

Melanie Sympson
Hunting Graduate Student Fellow

Xiaobing Tang
Steelcase Professor

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

2010 - 2011

Christian de Pee
Hunting Family Faculty Fellow

Visible Cities: Text and Urban Space in Middle-Period China, Eighth through Twelfth Centuries
Between the eighth and twelfth centuries, Chinese authors created literary forms and genres that made the cities of the period visible in new ways. Rather than using these texts to reconstruct the physical layout of Tang- and Song-dynasty cities and then analyzing these reconstructions, de Pee proposes to understand writing as a replication of movement through space and to understand the resulting text as a landscape. This approach will preserve historical continuities between textual form and urban space, as well as historical ways of experiencing the urban landscape.

Lisa Disch
John Rich Professor

Rethinking Re-Presentation

Is political representation legitimate only insofar as it approximates direct democracy, with representatives closely linked and precisely accountable to their constituents? With approval ratings for the Congress at an all-time low, many US citizens would say ‘yes’ to this question. Although they may be especially prominent today, animosity toward political representation and idealization of participatory politics are deep-seated features of US political culture. Disch’s research seeks to rehabilitate political representation as a form of democratic politics in its own right. She argues that political representation does not merely mirror but mobilizes, not merely reflecting existing demands but generating them. Inspiration on this point is taken from literary and cultural scholars who are accustomed to think of representation as an activity. As a political theorist, however, Disch will need to address the question of how to evaluate that activity: the aim to define a standard of evaluation by which to differentiate between more and less democratic instances of political representation.

Basil Dufallo
Hunting Family Faculty Fellow

The Captor’s Image: Greek Art in Roman Ekphrasis
While at the institute Dufallo plans to complete work on a book titled The Captor’s Image: Greek Art in Roman Ekphrasis (under contract with Oxford University Press), which focuses on descriptions of Hellenic art objects (ekphrasis) in classical Latin literature. Dufallo’s book argues that a new understanding of this technique affords us much fresh insight into what Greek culture meant for the Romans, specifically into how the Romans understood the Greek influence on their own identity. Roman ekphrasis in particular helps us perceive the complex cultural and political stakes inherent in the trope’s utilization when literary texts confirm, as much as they challenge, the priority of the visual image, an aspect of ekphrasis with which modern criticism and theory has been less concerned.

Julia Hell
Helmut F. Stern Professor


Imperial Ruins: Imagining the Decline of Rome from Napoleon to Hitler

In the wake of the Roman Empire, all modern European projects of imperial mimesis were haunted by the specter of decline, captured in images of Rome in ruins. In Imperial Ruins: Imagining the Decline of Rome from Napoleon to Hitler, Hell explores the role played by the Roman Empire and its ruins in European discourses about empire between 1800 and 1945, tracing the visual scenario of the imperial ruin gazer across a wide variety of textual and visual materials, ranging from the end of the eighteenth century to 1945.

Carol Jacobsen
John Rich Professor

Trial in Error

Carol Jacobsen will research and produce a new body of work in video and photography titled "Trial in Error." The project is based on historical and contemporary public documents and interviews with women recently released from prison, and will be presented in New York and elsewhere.

Amy Kulper
Steelcase Research Professor

Immanent Natures: the Laboratory as Metaphor in Architectural Design
Kulper’s book considers the role of the scientific laboratory in shaping the experimental legacy of the discipline of architecture. Her proposed research is to pursue the analogical construction of architecture as a laboratory in all of its aspects: as a fundamental link between positivist experiment and artistic experimentalism; as an instrumental lens on the natural world that helps construct spatial typologies appropriated from the sciences; as a trope that contributes to architecture’s preoccupation with its own design methods and processes; as a legacy that fundamentally shapes architecture’s critical project through the incorporation of scientific terminology, statistics and values; as a primary contributor to notions of autonomy in avant-garde production; as a pervasive force in the “self-fashioning” of the architect; and as an enabling metaphor allowing construction, design, and city planning to be conceptualized as (quasi) sciences.

Alaina Lemon
Hunting Family Faculty Fellow

Penetrating Minds: Reading Others in a “post” Orwellian World
The Cold War conditioned the rise of techniques central not only to surveillance and espionage, but also to stage and screen. Cell phones or social networking sites may seem the newest. Lemon’s research juxtaposes older but more diffuse techniques for “penetrating minds”: acting and telepathy. Her book will trace conversations across the ocean that knit theatrical aesthetics to paranormal science, while also stiffening the “Iron Curtain,” and will track how it is that techniques for reading others now perform other social realities.

Anton Shammas
Helmut F. Stern Professor

Blind Spots, and Other Essays on Translation
This book project is based on Shammas’ (rather oxymoronic) personal experience as a practitioner of translation, from and into Arabic, Hebrew and English, on the one hand, and as a teacher of translation theory on the other; and on some of the blind spots he detected, or so he has imagined, in both. The essays will span different foundational moments in the history of translation, starting with the translation into Latin of an eleventh century book by an Arab mathematician to whom Cervantes owes his novelistic perspective, through the resistance to translation embodied in the frustrating experience of the Arab-Jewish interpreter Columbus took with him on his first voyage, and ending with the attempts at translating the pain of tortured Palestinian prisoners into the legal English language of the affidavit. And some other moments in between.

Katherine Brokaw
James A. Winn Graduate Student Fellow

Tudor Musical Theater: Staging Religious Difference from Wisdom to The Winter’s Tale
Brokaw’s dissertation examines performances of both sacred and secular music in drama from the late-medieval morality plays to those of Shakespeare. The plays she explores re-present on stage the music that was significantly prevalent in religious and social life, music like Catholic ritual in sung Latin, Protestant hymns, peddler's ballads, and country dances, for example. These musical moments echo with Tudor England's religious changes, and with ongoing disputes about the spiritual efficacy of musical ceremony.

Puspa Damai
Mary Ives Hunting and David D. Hunting, Sr. Graduate Student Fellow


Welcoming Strangers: Hospitality in American Literature and Culture
By exploring nineteenth- and early-twentieth century American literature, this study seeks to demonstrate the centrality of hospitality and abuse of hospitality in American culture. Reading literary texts closely and in context, this study contends that examining American literature from the point of view of hospitality creates a space or threshold for the other of the nation and empire to be heard and received.

Ben Gunsberg
Sylvia "Duffy" Engle Graduate Student Fellow

The Old Promise of New Media Composition
This project explores relationships between technological innovation and composition pedagogy in American colleges and universities by analyzing the ways prominent conceptions of print-mediated writing have changed over the past half-century. Gunsberg links this historical analysis to more recent controversies, arguing that the proliferation of “new media” and Internet technology recasts and reconfigures older pedagogical promises to suit the demands of our precipitous “digital revolution.”

Alan Itkin
Mary Fair Croushore Graduate Student Fellow

Classical Motifs and the Representation of History in the Works of W.G. Sebald
Itkin’s dissertation argues that the representation of the traumatic historical events of the twentieth century in the works of the German author W. G. Sebald owes an essential debt to the classical tradition of epic poetry of Homer, Virgil, Ovid, and Dante. He argues Sebald's works reject a realist mode of historical representation in favor of one modeled on the idea of raising the dead past and bringing it into the living present associated with three linked classical motifs: nekyia (the raising of the dead), ekphrasis (the description of a work of art), and katabasis (the journey into the underworld). Sebald’s appropriation of these classical motifs to frame his literary representations of the traumatic historical events of the twentieth century, including the Holocaust, Itkin argues, may be seen as a response to the critical demand for new modes of representation adapted to events which defy traditional, realist means of representation.

Graham Nessler
Mary Fair Croushore Graduate Student Fellow

A Failed Emancipation? The Struggle for Freedom in Hispaniola During the Haitian Revolution, 1789-1809
Nessler’s dissertation examines conflicts over the meaning of liberty and citizenship in the colonies that became Haiti and the Dominican Republic during the Haitian Revolution (1789-1809). This revolution brought about the transformation of the French slaveholding colony of Saint-Domingue into the emancipationist and independent nation of Haiti. During this period, Santo Domingo (the colony that later became the Dominican Republic) also experienced profound political and social changes, passing in 1795 from the rule of slaveholding Spain to that of the emancipationist French Republic. Drawing upon abundant governmental and private correspondences, articles from assorted periodicals, and notarial acts created by individuals seeking to escape from enslavement, Nessler’s project investigates the implications of these political changes for the fifteen thousand men, women and children who were held captive in Santo Domingo when its cession transpired. Nessler will ultimately contend that the case of Santo Domingo severely challenged the French Republican emancipationist project and its grand promises of universal liberation and equal citizenship.

Nafisa Essop Shiek
A. Bartlett Giamatti Graduate Student Fellow

Relations of Governance: Gender, Law and the Making of a Colonial State
Nafisa Essop Sheik’s work explores how administrative struggles over gendered customary practices amongst European settlers, Zulu-speaking Africans and immigrant Indians shaped the making of a colonial settler state in Natal, on the east coast of South Africa, in the nineteenth century. She investigates the ways in which colonial discourse and legal interventions around intimate relations such as marriage created a nineteenth century British colonial state that was gendered by its own administrative efforts.

2009 - 2010

Y. David Chung
Helmut F. Stern Professor

Pyongyang – a drawing and video installation
North Korea exists for most people as an imaginary place, created from television clips and newspaper articles. Portrayed as a nation of uncompromising dictatorship, a land of famine, and a people ruled by an ideology whose hatred for the United States is matched in fervor only by the adoration of their deified leaders, North Korea is a country that remains a monstrous enigma to the world. Working from video and photographs from a recent trip to North Korea, the birthplace of his parents, David Chung plans to create a drawing and video installation which seeks to capture this place which lives in our minds and in our dreams.

Peter Ho Davies
John Rich Professor

The Great Race: a novel
"The Great Race" is a novel about the building of the transcontinental railroad, focusing on the experiences of the Chinese laborers of the Central Pacific. Of Celtic and Chinese descent, Davies was first drawn to the material by the competition between the Chinese and the largely Irish laborers of the Union Pacific to see who could lay track faster across the country. The book will consider themes of identity, and representation and explore the early years of the Chinese-American community.

Angela Dillard
John Rich Professor

James H. Meredith and the Boundaries of the American Historical Imagination
This political biography of James Meredith, the civil rights icon turned conservative Republican, attempts to situate our understanding of Meredith's “conservative turn” within broad shifts in American political culture and American historical memory from the 1960s to the present.

Valerie Kivelson
Steelcase Research Professorship

Desperate Magic: Witchcraft and the Lineaments of Power in Early Modern Russia
A study of witchcraft trials and belief in Russia in the 17th and 18th centuries, “Desperate Magic” demonstrates that witchcraft anxieties expressed particularly Russian concerns about serfdom and social hierarchy. This study upends traditional top-down models by revealing how power was contested, manipulated, and reproduced by people scrambling to survive in a fiercely inequitable world.

Keith Mitnick
Hunting Family Faculty Fellowship

The Architecture of Unseen Things
This project will use different forms of written and visual narratives to examine the role of architecture in defining accepted notions of the “normal” and the “everyday”. By overlaying a series of conflicting accounts and representations of a single contested locale, I will consider ways in which seemingly blank and banal buildings infer a false sense of neutrality upon the institutions they accommodate.

Ryan Szpiech
Hunting Family Professor

Authorizing Apostasy: Conversion and Narrative in Medieval Polemic
This is a study of narratives of religious conversion that appeared between the twelfth to the fourteenth centuries among Christians, Muslims, and Jews of the Western Mediterranean. It considers the autobiographical form of these mini-narratives as part of a reaction to the increasing role of logic and reason in religious apologetics after the twelfth century. By comparing surviving texts from different religious groups, it analyses the connection between contrasting notions of religious conversion and identity and a common forum of inter-religious polemical writing.

Magdalena Zaborowska
Hunting Family Professor

Racing Borderlands: Displacement, Difference, Dialogue, and American Cultural Traffic in the Second World
This book explores the new meanings of race and ethnicity in the cultural traffic between the First and Second Worlds post-1989/91. It brings into dialogue the life stories and visual archives documenting interactions among Jewish and Slavic immigrants and African American migrants from the South in the Chene street area in Detroit with the cultural work of domesticating difference and re-visioning East European multiculturalism in theatrical, musical, publishing, and academic activities of Fundacja Pogranicz in Sejny, Poland.

Claire Zimmerman
Helmut F. Stern Professor

“Photographic Architecture" from Weimar to Cold War:
The Case of Mies van der Rohe

Claire Zimmerman is writing a book about architectural representation in the twentieth century, focusing on the translation of information about space, material, and form into two-dimensional images. The book emphasizes the significant role played by photography in the historiography of modern architecture; it also studies the recursive effects of images, which began to alter building form in subtle but far-reaching ways in the post World War II period.

GRADUATE STUDENTS

Yanina Arnold
Sylvia “Duffy” Engle Graduate Student Fellow

Law and Literature in Late Imperial Russia, 1864-1917
Yanina Arnold’s dissertation examines the interaction between legal culture and literature in late imperial Russia and its lasting impact on Russian attitudes toward legal practices. She will explore the representation of legal culture by Russian writers, journalists, and legal professionals. Among other things, she will investigate how the literary activities of Russia’s “literary lawyers” contributed to their professional self-fashioning. Her dissertation project will include the translation from the memoir The Book of Death by Sergei Andreevsky (1847-1918).

Christopher Coltrin
Mary Fair Croushore Graduate Student Fellow

Destruction or Deliverance? The Politics of Catastrophe in the Art of John Martin
Christopher Coltrin’s dissertation analyzes the political associations of a series of apocalyptic themed paintings produced in England during the 1820s by the painters John Martin, Francis Danby, and David Roberts. Specifically, he will be investigating how these paintings may have encouraged progressive political reforms—including universal suffrage, a progressive structure of taxation, and land re-distribution—as a means of obtaining deliverance from impending divine destruction.

Christopher Davis
James A. Winn Graduate Student Fellow

Performing the Text: Troubadour Manuscripts and Vernacular Poetic Identity
For his study of the twelfth- and thirteenth-century troubadours of southern France, Christopher Davis uses thirteenth-century manuscript anthologies of troubadour song, or chansonniers, to explore the tensions between oral and textual models of poetic authority during this period. In particular, he is focusing on the influence of the Latin commentary tradition on representations of vernacular authorship and on the status of Occitan as a prestige vernacular for poetic composition.

 

Ari Friedlander
A. Bartlett Giamatti Graduate Student Fellow

Sex, Crimes, and Sex Crimes: Private Sins and Communal Concerns in Early Modern England
This project analyzes sexualized depictions of the poor and the criminal in early modern English popular pamphlets, and their impact on dramatic representations of nation, class and community formation. As mutually reaffirming markers of social unsuitability, crime and incontinent sexuality helped define the boundaries of English society at a local communal level, and as a growing national and economic power.

Daniel Hershenzon
Mary Ives Hunting and David D. Hunting, Sr., Graduate Student Fellow

Moving People, Moving Goods: Captivity and Ransom in the Early-Modern Western Mediterranean
This project examines the captivity, enslavement, and ransom of Habsburg and Ottoman subjects in the early-modern Western Mediterranean and the ways in which the movements of these enslaved captives across the sea were negotiated and defined in royal and religious bureaucracies.

Guillermo Salas
Mary Ives Hunting and David D. Hunting, Sr., Graduate Student Fellow

Religious Change and Ideologies of Social Distinction in the Southern Peruvian Andes
At the heart of this project is the diversity of the ideologies of social differentiation in the regional society of Cuzco, in the Southern Peruvian Andes. Paying attention to everyday life as well as well as evangelical conversions in Quechua communities, Salas aims to explain how different ideologies of social differentiation coexist, legitimizing and reproducing social hierarchies across cultural differences.

VISITING SCHOLARS

Jean Hebrard
Norman Freehling Visiting Professor

Jean M. Hébrard has worked for many years on the cultural history of south-west Europe focusing on the history of writing (scribal and personal practices). He participated in the large-scale enquiries on the history of reading and writing carried out in France in the 1980s and the 1990s and published numerous articles and books in this field (particularly Discours sur la lecture, 1880-2000, Paris, Fayard, 2000 with Anne-Marie Chartier). Recently he has extended his research area to the colonial world of Iberian and French Empires (particularly Brazil and Saint-Domingue). Professeur associé at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales , and visiting professor at the University of Michigan, he is a member of the Centre de Recherche sur le Brésil Contemporain (EHESS) and of the Centre international de recherche sur les Esclavages (CNRS).
 

2008 - 2009

Joshua Cole
Norman and Jane Katz Faculty Fellow

The Empire of Fear: Violence and Politics of the Colonial Situation in Eastern Algeria, 1919-1940
Joshua Cole’s current book project explores a period of intense political and cultural innovation in French Algeria during the years of the Popular Front, and several concurrent episodes of extreme violence that fractured local communities in the region in the years before World War II.

Caroline Constant
Helmut F. Stern Professor

The Modern Architectural Landscape
This study examines disciplinary intersections between architecture and landscape architecture in contemporary western design practices and the historic antecedents of this phenomenon. It challenges prevalent interpretations of the modern architectural project by foregrounding its social and cultural foundations in landscape.

Lucy Hartley
Helmut F. Stern Professor

The Democracy of the Beautiful
What is the place and importance of beauty in the industrial landscape of nineteenth-century Britain? This is the central question that Hartley will consider in her year at the Institute. She plans to complete a book exploring how the idea of a beauty for the people became linked to an emerging model of democratic governance; and why this attempt to democratize beauty failed to provide the collective enlightenment and social redemption it promised. More broadly, the book will ask whether the idea of a beauty for the people might have relevance today in renewing our understanding of democracy as well as the relation of art to society.

Paul Christopher Johnson
Hunting Family Professor

To Be Possessed: "Religion" and the Purification of Spirit"
Johnson’s project is an excavation of the category of “spirit possession,” considering first its creation as an early project of civil religion, next the ways the construct was implemented in colonial regulations of religion in the Americas, and finally the positive appropriation of the category by ethnographers and religious actors themselves. By closely examining philosophical, theoretical and discursive invocations of spirit possession as well as the empirical studies those models infiltrated, but also were influenced by, this study aims to show how the category worked not only as a descriptor of “primitive” religions but also, even primarily, as an exorcism the West performed on itself.

Rudolf Mrázek
John Rich Professor

Penal Colonies and Camp Cultures
This is a study of camps and camp culture in the era of triumphant technology. It is based on two case studies: of the Theresienstadt “ghetto” in the Nazi Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia (1941-1945) and of Boven Digoel, a colonial “isolation camp” in New Guinea, the Dutch East Indies (1927-1943).

Susan Parrish
John Rich Professor

A History of Disturbance: Ecology and Literature in the U.S. South, 1927-1947
Susan Parrish will be working on a book project that deals with the ecological imagination in the U.S. South and Gulf Coast in the early part of the twentieth century, with special attention to the 1930s. Of interest will be the intersection of race, environment, and epistemology in writers like Zora Neale Hurston, William Faulkner, James Agee, Marjorie Stoneman Douglas, and Richard Wright as well as in more diffuse cultural sources, like local southern newspapers and newsletters produced at southern Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) camps.

Stephanie Rowden
Helmut F. Stern Professor

A place has its stories
This is an experimental audio documentary about a city block in Detroit: the block which encompasses Woodward Avenue, Parsons Street, Cass Avenue, and Davenport Street. The project draws on stories and sounds recorded on a series of many walks (both literal and figurative) around this one block, and will be developed as a collection of vignettes for radio as well as a sound rich archive for the web.

Gareth Williams
Hunting Family Professor

The Mexican Exception: Sovereignty and Political Subjectivity in the Twentieth Century
Gareth Williams’ project examines the relation between culture and the political in twentieth-century Mexico. This work is located in the wake of the 1968 critique of the Mexican state. The events of that year highlighted the violent realities of Mexican sovereign power by putting the question of democratic culture and the illegitimacy of the post-revolutionary state at center stage. Drawing on literature, photography, popular culture and political philosophy, this book traces the cultural history of modern sovereignty and its relation to the on-going struggle for political democracy.

Danna Agmon
Mary Ives Hunting and David D. Hunting, Sr., Graduate Student Fellow

Where Do Go-Betweens Go? Colonial Intermediaries in Eighteenth Century India
This project examines French imperialism in India (1664-1761), and uncovers the different ways French traders, missionaries, and other settlers relied on their Indian employees. By foregrounding the tense relationship between the French and their local intermediaries, Danna Agmon exposes difficulties and failures that were a crucial yet hidden aspect of early colonial expansion. She hopes to demonstrate that the often-overlooked French experience in India is thus representative of the fractured, tense, and densely populated early stages of all colonial histories.

Lembit Beecher
James A. Winn Graduate Student Fellow

Estonia 1944: A Multimedia Chamber Oratorio
Lembit Beecher is working on a multi-media, chamber oratorio based on his grandmother’s and granduncle’s personal memories of Estonia during World War II when their homeland was occupied first by the Soviet Union, then Germany, and then the Soviet Union again. Along with their words, he will mine newspaper accounts, news reports, official records, letters and excerpts from the Estonian national epic Kalevipoeg, for text to set to music. In blurring the lines between music and narrative, documentary and drama, and fact and emotion, he is reaching for a mosaic-type of storytelling that investigates issues of memory, the nature of storytelling, and the relationship of drama to a sense of truth.

Eva-Marie Dubuisson
Sylvia “Duffy” Engle Graduate Student Fellow

The Making of Poetic and Political Authority in Kazakh Aitus
Eva-Marie Dubuisson is investigating new forms of authority and social sentiment in post-socialist Kazakhstan as evinced in aitus, a kind of improvisational verbal dueling between two poets. Over twenty years of authoritarian repression and censorship, poets have given consistent voice to sociopolitical critique. Throughout Eurasia, wherever aitus and similar forms of oral epic traditions live on, social actors from radically different walks of life collude in “successful” performance in order to create a cultural and political authority beyond that of the authoritarian state, and a sense of satisfaction for those involved.

Monica Kim

Humanity Interrogated: Empire, Nation, and the Political Subject in United States and United Nations Prisoner of War Camps during the Korean War, 1949-1954
Monica Kim researches U.S.-controlled prisoner of war camps during the Korean War, examining how POWs, military personnel, and government officials struggled to define the “prisoner of war” as a political subject during the early Cold War. Interrogation became the most relied-upon tool of the U.S. military for constructing, disciplining, and presenting the prisoner of war. Using military archives, oral history interviews, and international organization archives, Kim examines interrogation practices as engaging with and against other political practices in the POW camps and surrounding areas, while also tracing the conflict over “narrating the POW” starting in the interrogation room through international spheres of debate.

Amy Rodgers
Mary Fair Croushore Graduate Student Fellow

“The Sense of an Audience: Spectators and Spectatorship in Early Modern England, 1576-1612
Rodgers’ dissertation examines discourses of spectatorship that emerge alongside the development of the professional theater in early modern England. The sixteenth century witnessed a surge in a particular form of mass entertainment: professional drama. As the English commercial theater prospered, Tudor-Stuart culture developed new ways to describe the sort of looking that playgoing encouraged. Audience studies have tended to focus primarily on the effects of twentieth-century visual mediums on the modern spectator. Rodgers reframes spectatorship as a subject of inquiry that has been shaped by multiple influences and histories rather than as a telos that culminates in modern viewing technologies and subjects.
 

2007 - 2008

Paul Anderson
Hunting Family Professor

Hearing Loss: The Dreamlife of American Jazz
Paul Anderson’s work in cultural history offers a new window into the world of modern jazz.  While prominent accounts of modern jazz’s musical and social worlds are often vanguardist and forward-looking, Anderson circles backward to explore alternative narratives in terms of retrospection, nostalgia, and loss.  Among other threads, his reconstruction of the dreamlife of modern jazz traces various efforts to repair the fraying ties between modern jazz and popular music in the 1950s and 1960s and pays special attention to the fate of the popular song form, especially the ballad, within the period’s creative tumult.

Philip Deloria
John Rich Professor

Crossing the (Indian) Color Line: A Family History
In June 1931, Deloria’s grandmother—white, patrician, and pious, with a good job in New York City—agreed to marry his grandfather, an American Indian athlete-turned-minister whom she had met only a few days earlier. Their surprising union brought together two grand histories of colonial encounter. Deloria will write their history and also inquire into the consequences of their marriage, which unleashed devastating tensions surrounding racial crossing, the authority of men and women, the preservation and recording of Native cultures, and the possibilities for reconciliation among histories and memories defined by the dispossession of Native North America.

Tirtza Even
Helmut F. Stern Professor

Once a Wall, or Ripple Remains
“Once a Wall, or Ripple Remains” is a documentary project that aims to question the stability of any perception, record, or rendering of a series of videotaped encounters that took place in the summer and fall of 1998 in the Occupied Territory of Palestine. Spanning more than eight years, it also draws on a wide range of media (from single-channel video, CD-ROM, website, to written text and 3-D animation). Even seeks in this work to incorporate the documented images’ passage through media and through the history impacting their perception.

 

Andrew Herscher
Hunting Family Professor

Violence Taking Place: The Architecture of the Kosovo Conflict
How does violence take place? In this project, Herscher attempts to answer that question by examining the intersection of architecture and political violence in Kosovo.  Approaching destruction as a violent counterpart to architecture’s constructive endowment of material with meaning and effect, his examination focuses on sites where destruction has been threatened, feared, inflicted, experienced and remembered. Paying close attention to the material form, social situation, interpretation and memory of destruction, he understands each of these features as potentially salient in determining destruction’s political, social and cultural dimensions.

Katherine Ibbett
A. Bartlett Giamatti Faculty Fellow

Compassion and Commonality: Forms of Fellow-Feeling in Seventeenth-Century France
In her study, Ibbett considers the discourse of compassion in relation to the political discourses that explain and justify both domestic absolutism and the colonial projects of seventeenth-century France. Looking at how the notion of a French public develops through the private yet shared compassionate response to representations of suffering, she argues that the language of compassion plays a key role in the establishment of the newly self-conscious nation. The project draws on dramatic theory, political thought, popular novels, and accounts of colonial life and asks how and to what ends a culture famed for its inwardness and centralizing tendencies might nonetheless imagine its relations with situations and people beyond its boundaries.

Marcia Inhorn
Helmut F. Stern Professor

Reproducing Masculinities: Islam, IVF-ICSI, and Middle Eastern Manhood
Marcia Inhorn’s project investigates the intersecting domains of “Islamic masculinity” and “Islamic bioethics” as they are manifested in the realm of reproductive technoscience in the Middle Eastern region. Drawing upon Islamic fatwa literature, Middle Eastern gender scholarship, Arabic-language popular literature, and Middle Eastern men’s own reproductive narratives and oral histories (collected from more than 250 men), the project examines how differences in Islamic legal opinion are shaping notions of manhood in Middle Eastern societies where new biotechnologies of assisted conception are being introduced.

 

Scott Spector
John Rich Professor

Violent Sensations: Sexuality, Crime, and Utopia in Berlin and Vienna, 1860-1914
Vienna and Berlin were crucial sites in the development of modern conceptions of gender and sexuality, and also in the political emancipation movements these conceptions inspired. Prominent in this context were the birth of the science of sexology, the earliest articulations of homosexuality as an identity, the concomitant movement to abolish persecution of sexual minorities, and the “first-wave” feminisms of the turn of the century. At the same time, these cities became host to prurient fantasies that held a surprisingly prominent place in the period’s high culture, science and popular culture. Spector’s synthetic analysis shows how these narratives of sexuality and violence are part of a self-critical discourse on and of the modern subject.

Johannes von Moltke
Steelcase Research Professor

Moving Pictures: Film, History, and the Politics of Emotion
Johannes von Moltke investigates the interplay between history, emotions, and politics in the cinema. Focusing on the cinematic representation of German history in particular, he studies the ways in which filmmakers have used different genres (such as melodrama, comedy, or thrillers) to elicit specific emotions about the historical figures and events presented on film. As our historical distance from the “Third Reich” and the Holocaust increases, von Moltke suggests, these emotions shift in subtle but surprising ways. The project investigates not only the formal construction of these films and their appeal to spectator emotion, but also the broader political implications of this shift in our emotional relationship to history. It outlines a theory of spectatorship as an “affective practice” that both defines particular viewing publics and participates in the construction of community through emotion.

Elizabeth Ben-Ishai
Sylvia "Duffy" Engle Graduate Student Fellow

The Autonomy-Fostering State: Citizenship and Social Service Delivery
Ben-Ishai’s dissertation explores the obligations of the state to foster autonomy in its citizens, particularly its most vulnerable. The capacity for autonomy is a key requirement for access to full citizenship rights in contemporary democracies. Hence, she argues, an inclusive and universal notion of citizenship requires a version of what she refers to as “the autonomy-fostering state.” Ben-Ishai examines three “case studies” of social service delivery, drawing on empirical examples in order to theorize the conditions under which the state structures its relationships with citizens in ways that enable, rather than constrain, the development of autonomy-competency.

Yolanda Covington-Ward
Michigan Graduate Student Fellow

Embodied Histories, Danced Religions, and Performed Politics: Changing Conceptions of Kongo Cultural Performance
Covington-Ward’s dissertation utilizes the study of makinu—a general term for a complex of Kongo performance forms that incorporate dance, music, and song—to examine how the meanings and uses of Kongo cultural performances change in the contexts of socio-historical transformations, and how embodied practices in performances can be used to transmit, represent, and transform moral values, religious and political ideals, and group identities. Through her focus on cultural performances, Covington-Ward seeks to illuminate an area of study that has been largely overlooked by other scholars of Kongo culture and society, thus contributing new insights to the anthropology of performance in West-Central Africa.

Jonah Johnson
James A. Winn Graduate Student Fellow

Seasick yet Still Docked: Casting Kant’s Shadow in Post-Enlightenment German Drama
Johnson’s dissertation examines the consequences of early German Idealism for the writing and theorization of tragedy in the wake Kant’s critical philosophy.  By situating dramatists such as Friedrich Hölderlin and Heinrich von Kleist within the context of late-eighteenth century German philosophy, he argues that the often discussed “death of tragedy” during this period is tied to a crisis of representation shared by post-Enlightenment dramatists and philosophers alike.

Min Li
Mary Ives Hunting and David D. Hunting, Sr., Graduate Student Fellow

Conquest, Concord, and Consumption:  Becoming Shang in Eastern China
Min Li’s dissertation research is based on archaeological excavations at a frontier city of the Shang civilization (circa 1600-1040 B.C.) in early China. He investigates the ways that aspects of symbolic, social, and natural worlds converged in human interactions with animals, particularly in the realms of food and religious communication. In the context of state formation and imperial conquest, the distinction between human and animals, often construed and demarcated along lines of social difference involving the human other, informs on the self-definition and identity construction of early states and civilizations.

 

Jennifer Palmer
Michigan Graduate Student Fellow

Slavery, Race, and Gender in Eighteenth-Century La Rochelle
Jennifer Palmer examines how French people on French soil constructed and participated in slavery. To do so, she focuses on the port town of La Rochelle, a vibrant locale where people crossed boundaries of race, status, and culture. By concentrating on visual and archival sources, she explores the tension between two representations of slavery: slaves as the ultimate luxury goods, and slaves as community members embedded in networks of kinship, friendship, and patronage. Through a narrative of family relations with a subtext of visual representations, she considers how the ever-changing conceptions and practices of slavery were shaped and defined in France, not only in the colonies. In doing so, she conceptualizes slavery as central to French people’s understanding of family and self.

Stefan Stantchev
Michigan Graduate Student Fellow

Embargo: the Origins of an Idea and the Effects of a Policy
Stantchev’s project will clarify the origins and development of embargoes and the results of their employment. Economic sanctions have primarily interested political scientists who have analyzed them chiefly as economic tools for the achievement of foreign policy goals. Focusing on the use of embargoes by the Papacy, Venice, and Genoa primarily against Muslim, pagan, and Eastern Christian lands during the Middle Ages, Stantchev asks when, how, and to what perceived effect trade sanctions were employed. The main question that his work will address is whether or not embargoes (and thus economic sanctions in general) can be seen not only as an economic, but also as a cultural tool of statecraft.

2006 - 2007

Howard Markel
John Rich Professor

The Anatomy of Addiction: A Cultural, Social and Medical History of Addiction in the United States, 1900 to the Present
Markel hopes to write a book that takes a broad, engaging and scholarly look at the humanistic, medical, cultural, and popular understanding of addiction and addicts in twentieth-century America. He will focus not only on the well known substances of abuse such as heroin, cocaine, alcohol and nicotine but also on many other addictive behaviors (e.g., excessive sexual or gambling activity, overeating, etc.) that researchers have heretofore given inadequate historical or even clinical, weight.

Khaled Mattawa
Hunting Family Professor

Amorisco and A Typography of Strangers
Mattawa aims to complete two books. Amorisco is a book of poems in which he has set himself some specific challenges. Some of the works will be pure lyric poems of, at most, twenty lines, inspired by the “lyric distillation and conceptual density of Antonio Machado, Saadi Youssef, and Rainer Maria Rilke.” Other, longer, poems will “range freely among pressing questions and unresolved episodes.” He will also work on A Typography of Strangers, a study of three postcolonial poets: Rabindranath Tagore, Derek Walcott and Mahmoud Darwish.

Christi Merrill
Michigan Faculty Fellow

Memory with an Active Verb: Lessons in Translating Hindi
Merrill’s project of literary nonfiction grew out of her work as a Hindi translator. She has organized her book as a series of short meditations and vignettes, each of which focuses on a particular Hindi word or phrase with no exact equivalent in English. The entries are arranged in rough chronological order so that a personal narrative begins to emerge, one that asks questions about the ways individuals (especially Americans) might best translate concepts such as justice and dignity into daily life as lived across borders of language and culture.

James Robson
Helmut F. Stern Professor

Inside Asian Images: Religious Icons in the Context of Local and Ritual Practice
This project concerns a collection of small religious statuettes from Hunan province in south-central China. Rather than focusing on external aesthetics, Robson is looking inside the images and analyzing items placed in a small cavity carved in the back—including desiccated insects, medicine, paper money, talismans, and most importantly a short text with a wealth of historical information (identity of the deity, name of the patron who requested the image, and the reasons for its consecration)—in order to understand their function in contemporary Chinese popular religion and Daoist ritual.

Andrew Shryock
Charles P. Brauer Faculty Fellow

Welcome and Trespass: The Politics of Hospitality in Jordan and Beyond
Shryock will spend next year studying hospitality as a framework for politics, morality, and history. Most of his attention will be focused on Jordan, where hospitality is an important aspect of local and national identities. He will also look at how “Arab hospitality” has figured, historically, in transregional moral discourses of citizenship, political boundaries, and the rights of Others.

Jamie Tappenden
Michigan Faculty Fellow

Riemann and Frege: A Study in the Emergence of Contemporary Logic and Mathematics
Tappenden is concerned with the nineteenth-century emergence of contemporary styles of mathematical reasoning, with special focus on the “descriptive” style for presenting mathematical structures in Bernhard Riemann’s work and the effect this had on the emergence of modern logic in Gottlob Frege. Key to these developments is a different conception of how we identify the basic elements of a mathematical subject. Previously it had been taken for granted that the basic elements of a mathematical problem were the familiar operations like addition and multiplication. Riemann introduced the idea that identifying the basic features of a problem could be a crucial part of the problem itself.

Patricia Yaeger
A. Bartlett Giamatti Faculty Fellow

Luminous Trash: America in an Age of Conspicuous Destruction
Yaeger is investigating the social status of rubbish in modern and postmodern literary and visual cultures. She is particularly interested in trash that becomes anthropomorphic in post-apocalyptic film and fiction, in radiant trash in ethnic literatures, and in the speed-up of clutter in a world beset with serial commodification, as well as American acts of multi-national waste and destruction. What do visual and literary cultures tell us about America’s at-home and overseas contributions to environmental racism? In a world of programmed obsolescence, she says, it comes as no surprise that trash or rubbish becomes an important topic within postwar literary and visual arts. What is surprising is how luminously trash is represented; the way rubbish gleams.

Norman Yoffee
Steelcase Research Professor and Helmut F. Stern Professor

Winds of Desolation: A History and Archaeology of the Mesopotamian City of Kish
Norman Yoffee’s research is now split in three directions. They are, from most specific to most general: the history of Mesopotamia, especially in the Old Babylonian period (ca. 2000–1600 BC), the history and archaeology of the city of Kish (Mesopotamia) from ca. 3200 BC–300 AD, and the evolution of the earliest cities, states and civilizations. The second project, focusing on the city of Kish, will comprise Yoffee’s research as the Helmut F. Stern Professor in the Institute for the Humanities, 2006–07.

Diana Bullen
Mary Ives Hunting and David D. Hunting, Sr., Graduate Student Fellow

The Visual Culture of the Central Italian Foundling Hospital, 1400-1600
Diana Bullen is pursuing an interdisciplinary study that explores the status of the abandoned child in fifteenth- and sixteenth-century Italy in the context of the visual culture of charity. Focusing on the institutional environment of foundling hospital, she will study how images constructed ideas about charity toward children, how the display and visibility of both ritual acts and images played a crucial role in charitable administration, and how manipulations of the urban fabric worked to negotiate the places of charity in the early modern Italian city.

Claire Decoteau
Michigan Graduate Student Fellow

The Diseased Body Politic and the Corporeality of HIV/AIDS in South Africa
HIV/AIDS engulfed South Africa in its most vulnerable moment – during the period of transition from apartheid to a capitalist democracy. The struggle against HIV/AIDS takes place in a context in which multiple healing systems–bio-medical science, various forms of “traditional” healing, faith-based approaches–compete for the authority necessary to impose their understanding of the disease and the body over the public sphere. This competition is inseparable from South Africa’s recent neo-liberal economic restructuring and the growing power of the international pharmaceutical industry. On the ground, people with HIV/AIDS are struggling against poverty and access to basic services (including health care), while simultaneously negotiating multiple (and sometimes) contradictory health systems. This research focuses on the various healing methods South Africans are utilizing to treat HIV/AIDS and the effects that the combination of these methods has on peoples’ conceptualizations of health, sexuality and their bodies.

Philip Duker
James A. Winn Graduate Student Fellow

Diving into Mnemosyne’s Waters: Exploring the Depths of Memory and Musical Experience
Because music is an art that unfolds in time, the possibility for it to be more than a series of fleeting, disconnected moments hinges on a listener’s memory. Duker’s research explores how this seemingly straightforward capacity is understood from diverse disciplinary perspectives, and how each view can highlight different aspects of musical experience.

Kim Greenwell
Michigan Graduate Student Fellow

Between Nation, Empire and Colony: Unsettling Events and English-Canadian Identity in the Nineteenth-century British Empire
Greenwell is looking anew at the place of white settler colonies within the nineteenth-century British Empire. With a focus on Canada, she is examining the inherently comparative, narrative processes by which English-Canadians constructed their sense of identity in relation to a complex set of “others” and in response to key events elsewhere in the Empire. Ultimately she argues that the dynamics of identity-formation in such contexts challenge overly simplistic accounts of white racial privilege and compel a rethinking of how we study national, imperial and colonial projects, and the interrelations among the three, more broadly.

Edin Hajdarpasic
Michigan Graduate Student Fellow

Beyond ‘Nation vs. Empire’: Reform, Social Movements and the Search for Justice in Late Ottoman Bosnia
Hajdarpasic is studying the emergence of disparate movements that sought to effect political reform in Bosnia and Herzegovina during the late Ottoman period, an era that is usually described as the awakening of Balkan nations. By viewing the national undertakings alongside the demands for radical social change, he aims to arrive both at a contextualized analysis of the political transformations that reshaped the Ottoman Balkans in the nineteenth century and at a nuanced exploration of different local understandings of reform and social justice.

Andrew Highsmith
Michigan Graduate Student Fellow

America Is a Thousand Flints: Race, Class and the End of the American Dream in Flint, Michigan
Highsmith is exploring the spatial and structural barriers to racial equality and class fairness in the Flint, Michigan, metropolitan region from World War II to the present. With chapters on housing, urban renewal, schools, suburbanization, tax policies and deindustrialization, his dissertation traces the complex metropolitan contestation between and among the labor and civil rights movements, General Motors, white homeowners and civic elites for control over Flint’s postwar development. In the end, he hopes to show that the roots of urban crises in Flint and Genesee County can be traced back to the postwar triumphs of pro-growth policies that fostered uneven consumer abundance, suburban sprawl, capital decentralization and rigid racial segregation at the expense of social and economic justice.

Kristina Luce
Sylvia “Duffy” Engle Graduate Student Fellow

Revolutions in Parallel: The Rise and Fall of Drawing Within Architectural Design
Luce’s dissertation is a historical and comparative analysis of two ways in which architecture can be visually conceived and rendered. The first one involves the ascendancy of drawing within architectural design that developed during the Renaissance and remained ascendant for centuries. The second, which spells the likely passing away for drawing’s ascendancy, is the shift to computer-based design procedures of today.

Marti Lybeck
Michigan Graduate Student Fellow

Gender, Sexuality and Belonging: Female Homosexuality in Germany, 1890–1933
Lybeck’s dissertation uses female homosexuality as a focal point for tracing changes in the intimate lives of women in Germany over a half-century of rapid social change and intellectual ferment. Using archival records, autobiographies, ephemeral publications and literary sources, she documents the lives and interactions of several groups of women, including an early group of women university students, women civil servants and participants in the lesbian sexual subcultures of the twenties. Whether historical figures adopted the word “lesbian” to describe themselves or not, they were increasingly required to respond to the new concept of homosexuality as a medical category.

David Henry Hwang

Internationally acclaimed playwright David Hwang has produced several award-winning works, including FOB (Fresh Off the Boat, 1978),Family Devotions (1981), The House of Sleeping Beauties (1983), As the Crow Flies (1986), and M. Butterfly (1988), which won the Outer Critics Circle Award, the Drama Desk Award, and the Tony Award for Best Play of the Year. Hwang is known for plays that are politically conscious, often focusing on the tensions related to immigration, and the balance of conventions, traditions, and values between East and West. A graduate of Stanford University, Hwang also wrote the screenplay for the 1997 film Seven Years in Tibet.  He also collaborated with U-M composer Bright Sheng on The Silver River, and comes to Ann Arbor in in connection with a production of that work (January 20, 2007).

Bob Mankoff
Paula and Edwin Sidman Fellow in the Arts

Bob Mankoff, cartoon editor of The New Yorker and president of The Cartoon Bank, is one of the nation’s leading commentators on the role of humor in American politics, business, and life.  He edited The Complete Cartoons of The New Yorker (Black Dog & Leventhal); the best-selling coffee table book for holiday 2004, featuring all 68,647 cartoons ever published in The New Yorker since its debut in 1925.  He describes this as the “golden age of humor,” where humor helps build personal connections in business and personal relationships.

In 1991, he took out a small business loan and started The Cartoon Bank, a business devoted to licensing cartoons for use in newsletters, textbooks, magazines and other media. The Cartoon Bank initially licensed material that was not published by The New Yorker.  In 1997, The New Yorker purchased The Cartoon Bank from Mankoff, giving The Cartoon Bank access to all cartoons published in the magazine over the past eight decades.

Charles Stewart

Charles Stewart  is a socio-cultural anthropologist who has conducted long-term ethnographic field research on the Greek island of Naxos, and shorter periods of fieldwork in Thessaloniki, Athens and the Greek-speaking enclaves of southern Italy.  His main research interests are religion (especially syncretism), nationalism and perceptions of the past in Greece and cross-culturally.  He has recently edited volumes on anthropological approaches to dreaming, the ethnographic study of historicity, and creolization in historical, ethnographic and theoretical perspective.  He is presently writing a book on dreaming and historical consciousness in Greece, which draws on ethnographic data collected in mountain Naxos and historical sources. He studied English and Classics at Brandeis University and earned his D. Phil. in Social Anthropology at the University of Oxford.

Sekou Sundiata

Sekou Sundiata who appeared at UMS as both a solo theater performer and a front man for his band in 2003, returns with his new work, the 51st (dream) state. (Saturday, January 20, 8 pm). This candid, yet lyrical, contemplation of America’s national identity and its guiding mythologies is both hopeful and questioning. The work features next-generation jazz musicians and vocalists with new music composed by Ani DiFranco, Graham Haynes, and others.

Sundiata says, “Living in the aftermath of 9/11, I feel an urgent and renewed engagement with what it means to be an American. But that engagement is a troubling one because of a longstanding estrangement between American civic ideals and American civic practice. This project is my response to this reality. I take it as a civic responsibility to think about these things out loud, in the ritualized forum of theater and public dialogue.”

The work, which grew in part out of his 2003 Ann Arbor residency and through sustained relationships with members of the U-M community and Detroit-based partners, unites art and civic dialogue through songs, poems, monologues, and video. The 51st (dream) state explores how America defines itself in a new era characterized by unprecedented global influence and power, and what it means to be both a citizen and an individual in a deeply complex, hyper-kinetic society.

2005 - 2006

Faculty Fellows

David Caron - Michigan Faculty Fellow
Associate Professor - Romance Languages
"The Contested Ghetto: French Republicanism and the Politics of Community"

Gregory Dowd - Helmut F. Stern Professor
Professor - History/American Culture
"'Bad Birds,' 'Flying Reports,' and Frontier Rumor in Early America"

Sara Forsdyke - John Rich Professor
Assistant Professor - Classical Studies
"Politics and Popular Culture in Ancient Greece"

Howard Markel - John Rich Professor
Professor of History of Medicine and of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases
"The Anatomy of Addiction: A Cultural, Social and Medical History of Addiction in the United States, 1900 to the Present"

Khaled Mattawa - Hunting Family Professor
Assistant Professor of English (Creative Writing)
"Amorisco and A Typography of Strangers"

Christi Merrill - Michigan Faculty Fellow
Assistant Professor of Comparative Literature and Asian Languages and Cultures
"Memory with an Active Verb: Lessons in Translating Hindi"

Steve Mullaney - John Rich Professor
Associate Professor - English
"The Work of the Stage: Trauma and Collective Identity in the Age of Shakespeare"

Marianetta Porter - Helmut F. Stern Professor
Associate Professor - Art and Design
"Memory Breeze"

Elisha Renne - Michigan Faculty Fellow
Associate Professor - Anthropology/CAAS
"The Spiritual, Social, Spatial Connections of Yoruba Religious Textiles"

James Robson - Helmut F. Stern Professor
Assistant Professor of Asian Languages and Cultures
"Inside Asian Images: Religious Icons in the Context of Local and Ritual Practice" 

Catherine Sanok - A. Bartlett Giamatti Faculty Fellow
Assistant Professor - English/Women's Studies
"English Legends: Gender, Religion, and National Identity in Pre-modern England"

Andrew Shryock - Charles P. Brauer Faculty Fellow
Associate Professor of Anthropology
"Welcome and Trespass: The Politics of Hospitality in Jordan and Beyond"

Andrea Smith - Human Rights Fellow
Assistant Professor of Native American Studies, American Culture and Women’s Studies
"'Glocal' Organizing: The U.S. Human Rights Movement"

Louise K. Stein - Steelcase Research Professor
Professor - Musicology
"Spaniards at the Opera: Operas, Patrons, Singers, and the Publics in Madrid, Rome, Naples, and Lima, 1659-1701"

Jamie Tappenden - Michigan Faculty Fellow
Associate Professor of Philosophy
"Riemann and Frege: A Study in the Emergence of Contemporary Logic and Mathematics"

Jason Weems - Hunting Family Professor
Assistant Professor - Art History (UM-Dearborn)
"Barnstorming the Prairies: Flight, Aerial Vision, and the Idea of the Midwest, 1920-1940"

Patricia Yaeger - A. Bartlett Giamatti Faculty Fellow
Professor of English
"Luminous Trash: America in an Age of Conspicuous Destruction"

Norman Yoffee - Steelcase Research Professor and Helmut F. Stern Professor
Professor of Near Eastern Studies and Anthropology
"Winds of Desolation: A History and Archaeology of the Mesopotamian City of Kish"

Graduate Fellows

Diana Bullen - Mary Ives Hunting and David D. Hunting, Sr., Graduate Student Fellow
History of Art
"The Visual Culture of the Central Italian Foundling Hospital, 1400-1600" 

Claire Decoteau - Michigan Graduate Student Fellow
Sociology
"The Diseased Body Politic and the Corporeality of HIV/AIDS in South Africa"

Philip Duker - James A. Winn Graduate Student Fellow
Music Theory
"Diving into Mnemosyne’s Waters: Exploring the Depths of Memory and Musical Experience" 

Didem Ekici - Mary Fair Croushore Graduate Student Fellow
Architecture
"Bruno Taut's Vision of the 'Orient': Creating a Universal Architecture"

Julen Etxabe - Mary Ives Hunting and David D. Hunting, Sr., Graduate Student Fellow
Law
"Laws in Tragic Conflict: Sophocles' Antigone and Judicial Decision-Making"

Kim Greenwell - Michigan Graduate Student Fellow
Sociology
"Between Nation, Empire and Colony: Unsettling Events and English-Canadian Identity in the Nineteenth-century British Empire"

Asli Gür - Sylvia “Duffy” Engle Graduate Student Fellow
Sociology
"Educating the 'Orient': Transculturation of Foreign Educational Practices and Imperial Imagination in the Ottoman Empire (1857-1914)"

Edin Hajdarpasic - Michigan Graduate Student Fellow
History
"Beyond ‘Nation vs. Empire’: Reform, Social Movements and the Search for Justice in Late Ottoman Bosnia"

Andrew Highsmith - Michigan Graduate Student Fellow
History
"America is a Thousand Flints: Race, Class and the End of the American Dream in Flint, Michigan"

Myeong-seok Kim - Mary Fair Croushore Graduate Student Fellow
Asian Languages
"Theories of Emotion in Early Chinese Confucian Texts"

Sumiao Li - James A. Winn Graduate Student Fellow
English/Women's Studies
"Fashionable People, Fashionable Societies: Gender, Fashion, and Print Culture in Britain, 1820-1860"

Kristina Luce - Sylvia “Duffy” Engle Graduate Student Fellow
Architecture
"Revolutions in Parallel: The Rise and Fall of Drawing Within Architectural Design" 

Marti Lybeck - Michigan Graduate Student Fellow
History
"Gender, Sexuality and Belonging: Female Homosexuality in Germany, 1890–1933" 

Bhavani Raman - Mary Ives Hunting and David D. Hunting, Sr., Graduate Student Fellow
History
"Document Raj: Scribes, Writing and Society in Early Colonial South India"

Visiting Fellows

Louis Andriessen, Netherlands Visiting Professor and Artist-in-Residence
In residence, February 5 – 19, 2006 

Jaq Chartier, Artist
In residence, January 8 – 14, 2006

David Henry Hwang
Playwright, New York City
In residence, January 2007 

Marian Hobson, Professor of French at Queen Mary, University of London
Norman Freehling Visiting Professor
In residence, Winter 2006 

Basil Jones and Adrian Kohler, Handspring Puppet Company and Yaya Coulibaly, Sogolon Puppet Company
In residence, October 17 – 30, 2005 

German Kim
History and Korean Studies, Kazakh National University named after al-Farabi
Mellon Global Fellow
In residence, Fall 2006 

Bob Mankoff
Cartoon Editor, The New Yorker
Paula and Edwin Sidman Fellow in the Arts
In residence, March 5 – April 6, 2007 

Nicolette Molnár, Stage Director
Mellon Arts and Knowledge Fellow
In residence, Winter 2006 

Livia Monnet, Professor of Comparative Literature, Film, and Media Studies, University of Montreal
In residence, February 12 – 25, 2006 

Lawrence N. Powell, Professor of History, Tulane University, New OrleansMarc and Constance Jacobson Lecture
In residence, September 12 – October 13, 2005 

Charles Stewart
Anthropology, University College London
In residence, March 5 – April 6, 2007 

Sekou Sundiata
Poet and Performance Artist
Eugene Lang College, The New School for Liberal Arts 
In residence January 7- 21, 2007 

Neferti Tadiar
History of Consciousness, University of California, Santa Cruz
Mellon Global Fellow
In residence, October 29 – November 12, 2006 

Celestine Uwem Akpan
Careers in the Making Fellow
In residence, Fall 2006 

2001 - 2002

Michigan Faculty Fellows (2001-2002)

Derek Collins
Assistant Professor, Classical Studies
John Rich Professor
"Master of the Game: Competition and Performance in Greek Poetry"

Nadine Hubbs
Assistant Professor, Music Theory and Women's Studies
"Composing Oneself: Gay Modernists and American Musical Identity"

Webb Keane
Associate Professor, Anthropology and Visiting Associate Professor, Asian Languages and Cultures
"Missionaries, Protestants, and Dilemmas of 'Modernity' in Indonesia"

Valerie Kivelson
Associate Professor, History
Hunting Family Faculty Fellow
"Muscovite Sketches: Maps and Their Meanings in Seventeenth-Century Russia"

Rudolf Mrázek
Professor, History
Steelcase Research Professor
"Jakarta, Indonesia: The Post-Colonial Metropolis, 1930-2002"

Patricia Olynyk
Assistant Professor, Art and Design
Helmut F. Stern Professor
"Hybrid Creatures"

George Steinmetz
Associate Professor, Sociology and German
A. Bartlett Giamatti Faculty Fellow
"Precoloniality: German Ethnographic Discourse and the Colonial State"

Michigan Graduate Fellows (2001-2002)

Apollo Amoko
English
James A. Winn Graduate Student Fellow
"The Problem with English Literature: Canonicity, Citizenship, and the Idea Africa"

Shannon Lee Dawdy
Anthropology and History
Mary Fair Croushore Graduate Student Fellow
"La Ville Sauvage: Colonials and Creoles in French New Orleans, 1699-1769"

Erica Lehrer
Anthropology
"Trauma, Tourism, and Identity: Reconstructing Jewishness in Poland"

Anna Pegler-Gordon
American Culture
"In Sight of America: Photography and US Immigration Policy, 1880-1930"

Andrea Seri
Near Eastern Studies
Hunting Family Graduate Student Fellow
"Local Power: Structure and Function of Community Institutions of Authority in the Old Babylonian Period"

Eben Wood
English
"Black Abstraction: Umbra and the Terms of the African-American Avant-Garde, 1960-1975"

Michigan Visiting Fellows (2001-2002)

Mel Chin
Artist, North Carolina and New York
Paula and Edwin Sidman Fellow in the Arts

Lorelei Corcoran
Director, Institute of Egyptian Art and Archaeology, University of Memphis

Rhys Isaac
Professor emeritus, History, La Trobe University, Australia

Martha Nussbaum
Marc and Constance Jacobson Lecture and SymposiumLaw and Ethics, University of Chicago
"Global Duties: Cicero's Problematic Legacy"

Griselda Pollock
Social and Critical Histories of Art
Director of the AHRB Centre for Cultural Analysis, Theory and History, University of Leeds, UK

Gayle S. Rubin
Anthropologist
Founder, Women's Studies Program at the University of Michigan
Norman Freehling Visiting Professor

Janet Williams
Artist, Nebraska
Jill S. Harris Memorial Fund

2000 - 2001

Michigan Faculty Fellows (2000-2001)

Carol Bardenstein
Assistant Professor, Near Eastern Studies
"Cultivating Attachments: Discourses of Rootedness in Palestine/Israel"

Michael Bonner
Associate Professor, Near Eastern Studies
Helmut F. Stern Professor
"Circulation and Exchange in the Transition from Late Antiquity to Early Islam"

Matthew Connelly
Assistant Professor, History and Public Policy
"Population Control: An International History from the Eugenics Movement to the Cairo Conference"

Gillian Feeney-Harnik
Professor, Anthropology
Hunting Family Fellow
"The Ethnography of Creation"

Arlene Keizer
Assistant Professor, English, Afroamerican and African Studies
A. Bartlett Giamatti Faculty Fellow
"Black Subjects: Theories of Identity Formation in Contemporary African American and Caribbean Literature"

Eileen Pollack
Assistant Professor, English
John Rich Professor
"Woman Walking Ahead: In Search of Catherine Weldon and Sitting Bull"

Lawrence Sklar
Professor, Philosophy
Steelcase Research Professor
"The Life of a Theory" 

Michigan Graduate Student Fellows (2000-2001)

Gina Bloom
English
James A. Winn Graduate Student Fellow
"Choreographing Voice: Staging Gender in Early Modern England"

Charles Goodman
Philosophy
"Ancient Dharmas, Modern Debates: Towards an Analytic Philosophy of Buddhism"

Fernando Lara
Architecture
Hunting Family Graduate Student Fellow
"Popular Modernism: An Analysis of the Acceptance of Modern Architecture in 1950's Brazil"

Morgan Liu
Anthropology
Sylvia 'Duffy' Engle Graduate Student Fellow
"Uzbek Sensibilities of Authority and Political Imagination in an Ex-Soviet Central Asian City"

Sarah Womack
History
Rackham Dean's Graduate Student Fellow
"Colonialism and the Collaborationist Agenda: Pham Quynh, France, and the Invention of a Neo-traditional Vietnam" 

Michigan Visiting Fellows (2000-2001)

Massimo Bacigalupo
American Literature
University of Genoa, Italy

Benjamin Bagby and Ping Chong
Joint residency sponsored by the Jill S. Harris Memorial Fund
Creation and premiere of a new work, "Edda: Viking Tales of Revenge, Lust, and Family", co-commissioned by the University Musical Society, and Lincoln Center

Natalie Zemon Davis
Henry Charles Lea Professor emerita, Princeton University
Marc and Constance Jacobson Lecture, Fall Semester
"Rethinking Cultural Mixture: The Travels of 'Leo Africanus'"

Svetlana Alpers
Art Historian emerita, Visiting Research Professor, New York University
Marc and Constance Jacobson Lecture, Winter Semester
"Velázquez's The Spinners, or What Are We Looking For?"

Ruth Weisburg
Dean of the School of Fine Arts, University of Southern California

Felipe Ortega
New Mexican Artist
Norman Freehling Visiting Professor