Skip to Content

Museum Studies Minor Alumni Profiles

Katherine Carlton

Concentrations/Minors: Anthropological archaeology, minor in Museum Studies and Native American studies

Why did you decide to pursue the museum studies minor?
I decided to pursue the minor because I was interested in majoring in archaeology and minoring in Native American studies, which led me to an interest in repatriation and I was really drawn to those ethical aspects of archaeology. And I first heard about the minor when I was doing a dig in Arizona with professor Lisa Young and we were working there and I was really interested in issues of ownership and tribal involvement and repatriation, and Ray Silverman came out to the field that summer and that’s when we heard that they were thinking about creating the minor. And it fit perfectly with what I was interested. They launched the minor when I was going into my senior year and I fit it all in. And I was able to complete my trifecta of interest.

How did the museum studies minor impact your other fields of study?
It just really helped to give a more holistic picture. In archaeology, there are obviously a lot of issues related to museums. I was able to pursue a thesis in the anthropology department that focused on my interests in Native American studies and museum studies. It really helped me round everything out.

What was your favorite class that you took for the minor requirements and why?
Definitely Museums 401, Ethical Issues in Archaeology. I took that last semester of my senior year. It was perfect because I kind of had law school in the back of my mind, but I wasn’t sure. I knew I didn’t want to work in a museum or do archaeology, per se, but I thought that I could hopefully tie all my interests together through practicing law. Issues of repatriation, protection of historic sites, museum aquisitins, etc. - it gave me a focused direction for my life in general. So it helped me realize what I wanted to do with my life.

How was your internship experience?
I worked at the museum of anthropology photographing the baskets from the Great Lakes collection, which was perfect because I was working on my thesis at the same time and my thesis was about digital representation of artifacts and the whole concept of digital repatriation. So my thesis was about how is knowledge-sharing different in the virtual environment. As part of my thesis, I got to do this internship where I took photographs of these objects and put them online on a database and study how tribes used the databases and communicated their knowledge about the artifacts.

How do you feel your life at the university and beyond has been and will be affected by pursuing a museum studies minor?
The minor has affected me in lots and lots of ways. After I graduated, I got an internship at the NAGPRA office in D.C., which is the office that facilitates repatriation. And they said that they hired me specifically because of my museum studies background. It’s very rare for that to be area of study, so that gave me an edge in applying to those internships. I think one of the reasons I got in to the law schools I did and Michigan’s law school in particular is because of my diverse background. It helps to have that diversity. Actually, the admissions office to the UofM law school wrote a personal note on my acceptance letter, saying “you have such a cool background, I love that you worked at all these museums.” And then I chose to attend law school at the University of Michigan because I can pursue the graduate certificate program in museum studies. So the minor really led me on that path.

Why would you recommend a student to pursue a museum studies minor?
I would recommend it because I think it could help you in anything you choose to go into. It doesn’t have to be museums. I’m in law school and somehow I managed to use the minor. I would recommend the minor to anyone because it’s so holistic and helps you think about issues.

Where do you see museums fitting into your future?
I want to do museum law, so hopefully I’ll be working with museums for the rest of my life. I hope to work with museums and their legal department. As a lawyer, I hope that I’ll have involvement with museums for the rest of my life.

Teplyn Fournier

Concentrations/Minors: BA in Modern Greek and Art History, Museum Studies Minor

Why did you decide to pursue the museum studies minor?
I can’t really remember a time that I didn’t like museums. When I was growing up, I loved playing and learning in science and children’s museums. As I grew older, I gained an appreciation for art and history museums as means of deeper exploration and application of what I had learned in school. For some reason, I’ve just always been fascinated by objects – not only their physical characteristics but also the stories that they do, and don’t, tell. When the new museum studies minor was announced at the end of my junior year at Michigan, I was more than intrigued to learn about the underlying why’s and how’s of all the museums I had visited over the years.

How did the museum studies minor impact your other fields of study?
It seemed like a natural complement to my art history major – a way of putting all of the theory and history I had learned into practice. With modern Greek, the connection was not as readily apparent at first. Gradually learning about the various roles and interpretations of objects in different cultures, though, helped me better understand how museums and their preservation of Greek objects – from ancient to modern – has influenced the formation of modern Greek culture and society.

What was your favorite class that you took for the minor requirements and why?

Elaine Gazda’s museums class. Her approach was both discussion- and experience-based, which was very engaging. We also took a weekend field trip to New York City to meet with curators at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and tour as many museums as possible in about 36 hours. Many of our other classes were held at local museums and involved discussions with other museum professionals.

How was your internship experience?
I was lucky enough to have two internships – one to fulfill the internship requirement and the other qualifying as an elective. At the Map Library, I helped compile an annotated bibliography of potential atlases for an upcoming Mediterranean exhibit. I had the opportunity to leaf through incredible atlases held by the U of M library system and assume the thought process of a curator – deciding on what pieces would be compelling and why. In my other internship, I worked with a team from the School of Education – composed of a professor and two graduate students – that was creating a new world history curriculum for Michigan middle school students. I acted as a museum consultant of sorts, developing ways to reinforce the curriculum with objects held by the numerous University of Michigan museums. Both were valuable, entertaining learning experiences that helped me see the utility and value of museums beyond the typical public visitor experience.

Which museums has the minor led you to be involved in?
While I was at Michigan, the minor led me to be involved with the UMMA, Exhibit Museum of Natural History, and the Map Library in a range of capacities – student docent, tour guide, curriculum planner, and exhibit researcher. Right after graduation, I went to work as an Elizabeth Perkins Fellow at the Museums of Old York in my home state of Maine. Here, I collaborated with two other fellows in planning the reinterpretation of an 18th-century historic tavern building. This past spring, while studying at Maine Maritime Academy in Castine, Maine, I completed a project with the Wilson Museum – a small but very diverse museum on the coast – helping to revitalize their membership program. Now that I’m living in San Diego, I’m looking forward to becoming involved in the vast array of museums that the city is home to.

How do you feel your life at the university and beyond has been and will be affected by pursuing a museum studies minor?
The word that first comes to mind is enrichment. At the university, my involvement in the museum studies minor led to a number of unique, memorable learning experiences: the digital curation project, a field trip to New York City, browsing through centuries old atlases, and handling artifacts from Paleolithic peoples. Even after graduating from Michigan, my understanding and appreciation of museums has led to many incredible experiences, both professional and personal. Going forward, I know that I will continue to seek out opportunities to be involved in museums – it’s just too rewarding and continuously fascinating to forgo.   

Why would you recommend a student to pursue a museum studies minor?
For anyone who has ever had a memorable experience at a museum, zoo, theme park, or even retail store, enjoyable or otherwise, I think the museum studies minor imparts a valuable and rewarding understanding of our interactions and relationships with the material (and, in some cases, even immaterial) world. For me, it helped me satisfy my curiosity of why I have been drawn to museums, why I enjoy looking at and learning about objects. Interestingly, I also came to understand why I have not enjoyed some museums. For this reason, I would recommend the museum studies minor to museum lovers and strangers alike. Also, although I did not realize it at the time, I gained a great amount of business management knowledge. This proved quite valuable during my graduate work in global logistics and allowed me to contribute a different perspective – i.e., that of the not-for-profit world – to discussions and in my coursework.

Where do you see museums fitting into your future?

Hopefully always closely, whether it be personally or professionally. Even though I’m not working in the field currently, I would love to someday pursue a director position – once I have gained the business management experience it requires. After I have settled into my new world here on the west coast, I plan to begin seeking out opportunities to become involved at museums in San Diego – my life just wouldn’t feel complete without it.

Jodi Gorochow

Concentrations/Minors: BA Art History and Minor in Museum Studies

Why did you decide to pursue the museum studies minor?
I had already declared art history during my freshman year and I thought it would be a good match because I knew that I wanted to work in a museum. I had always enjoyed going to museums. I just wanted to learn more about museums and what kinds of professions are available.

How did the museum studies minor impact your other fields of study?
I had an internship and I worked at the Denver Art Museum on their Native American collection, so my research skills that I had developed through art history papers were brought out in that internship. I took one class - Visual Cultures of the Black Atlantic - and that counted for my minor, so that was one way that it combined. I’m really interested in African art, and the museum world is about telling stories and how you tell those stories, so we talked about that in museum studies classes.

What was your favorite class that you took for the minor requirements and why?
I really enjoyed the Screen Arts and Cultures class I took on TV sitcoms. I know that the museum studies minor offers a lot of elective choices in SAC, but I had never taken one before and this pushed me to extend my boundaries. It was very interesting and brought history into the picture through sitcoms. It was another way to tell a story. I also enjoyed the Visual Cultures of the Black Atlantic, because it was about issues that I’m very interested in and it explored more than objects, it explored how you analyze things you can’t touch.

How was your internship experience?
It was incredible. I lucked out on my supervisor. She was really hands on, but at the same time was given a lot of responsibility and worked independently throughout the whole process. I worked on the reinstallation of the Denver Art Museum’s Native American collection. They have a great collection, but they didn’t think that the way it was installed was correct for today, so they wanted to bring it into the present. A big focus for them was highlighting the artist, which was never really done before. I got to learn about reinstallation projects. I worked on interpretive guides for specific pieces that the docents would highlight. My research skills from art history came into play, but it was for the education department. So I had to think of the public and how to make the art more accessible. I had previous internships in education before and this internship really solidified those experiences and my desire to go into museum education. I liked how the Museum Studies Program allowed me to do something off campus and how they were flexible. I feel so lucky.

Which museums has the minor led you to be involved in?
One of my classes was an RC class called Community Empowerment through the arts and I petitioned for it to count as an elective for the minor. It had an internship as part of the class. So for the internship I facilitated once a week at an alternative high school in Ypsilanti. I had three other interns with a class a ten and we had to come up with a lesson plan using the arts in some sort of way and teaching them how to express themselves in a healthy way and how to respect themselves and others. I brought in my art history knowledge, and it was really a great experience. I saw the way in which art can really change someone for the better. That changed my perspective and reminded me how much I want to pursue a career that includes art helping people.

What was one thing that surprised you about museums during your pursuit of the museum studies minor?
What really surprised me was, I learned this in 401, how a lot of museum professionals have shifted from being object-centered to being people centered, but studies have shown that visitors don’t want to learn, they want to have fun and enjoy their time. I learned that I felt that museum professionals were disconnected with what their public wants. And we talked about how museums have to be sneaky about how they present information to the public so that even if a visitor doesn’t want to learn, they can still get something out of a visit. That was the most shocking thing to me.

Where do you see museums fitting into your future?
And I definitely know that I want to pursue museum education. And I’m looking into graduate school and internships, I’m really really passionate about it. And I really think it’s something that I’m good at will enjoy. The internships helped me find that calling.

Marleigh Hill

Concentrations/Minors: BA in Art History and Psychology, Museum Studies minor

Why did you decide to pursue the museum studies minor?
Well I learned about the minor when I decided that I was going to major in art history as well as psychology and I wanted something practical to merge my two majors together and I thought that the museum studies minor was a good way to do that.

How did the museum studies minor impact your other fields of study?
I feel myself using psychology methods more in a museum environment when interacting with people and not just art pieces. You kind of figure out certain ways that people think about certain things. It showed me that there’s more than just art to museums, there are people involved.

How was your internship experience?
I started the UMMA internship as a docent first semester of senior year, but then I got really busy and couldn’t continue it second semester. So, I’m going to finish that up at the end of the summer after my internship at the Hands On Museum is over. For the docent internship, I did two things, I sat at the front desk and directed people into the galleries or leading people on little tours. At the end of the summer, I think I’ll be working on developing new things for kids at UMMA. At the Hands On Museum, I’m working in public programs, and I came up with weekly themes and activities to do around those themes.

How did the virtual exhibit project from Museums 301 help reveal the interdisciplinarity of museums to you?
I think that a lot of people, when they think of museums, they think about being a curator and a lot of people don’t really know what a curator does. The visual project was good for showing people what that role does. You think of a theme and you figure out what pieces are going into it and you figure out where the walls are going to be and how big the displays are going to be and how people move through it. It was interesting. I did my project on jewelry -- I have a lot of jewelry because I pick up a piece from wherever I go when traveling. But that was hard because everything was really small and I had to find a way to make a lot of small pieces fill a big space.

What was one thing that surprised you about museums during your pursuit of the museum studies minor?
I found that I loved the Hands On Museum and I loved working with kids in museum settings, but I was surprised that the Hands On Museum wasn’t where I wanted to be. I wanted to be in a history museum or an art museum. It’s not because I like those things more, it’s because I like the challenge of figuring out how to get kids engaged in a museum that isn’t geared toward them. It’s easy to get kids into a hands-on museum. it’s a challenge to get kids into an art museum. I want to figure out a way to get kids excited about art, not about bubbles. It was a self-discovery.

Why would you recommend a student to pursue a museum studies minor?
I think it’s a growing field, and a lot of people are interested in museums but don’t know how to pursue that, and a lot people don’t know that they’re interested in museums until they take that first class. So I think it’s a good way to stem between two majors or just because you’re interested in it.

Kathryn Huss

Concentrations/Minors: BA Anthropology and History of Art, Museum Studies Minor

Why did you decide to pursue the museum studies minor?
When deciding which University to go to, I actually chose U of M because it has more than one museum on campus and I noticed in the catalog that the school offers a museum studies program. I’ve always dreamed of working in the museum field and it was what I wanted to focus on in school. Much to my disappointment, it was not until after I enrolled that I learned the program was only offered to graduate students. I chose to study Anthropology hoping that the education would be useful in the museum field. With a year left to finish school, I received an email introducing the new museum studies program for undergraduates. I was extremely excited to discover that I had room to fit my museum studies classes in for my last year. I was able to graduate completely satisfied with my degree.

How did the museum studies minor impact your other fields of study?
The University of Michigan Exhibit Museum of Natural History has an entire floor dedicated to Anthropology. I would often walk through the exhibits thinking about how an anthropologist would interpret a display compared to an individual with a museum studies background. In an archaeology introduction course, Professor Lisa Young was always incorporating research ethics into her lectures, which would explain the concern of how archaeological research affects surrounding Native American communities. In a museum ethics class, I did my final research paper on the removal of the Native American Dioramas at the Exhibit Museum. I learned that research and how that research is shared with the public affect Native American communities.

How was your internship experience?

I purposely chose a large museum, the University of Michigan Museum of Natural History, and a smaller museum, Cobblestone Farm for my internships. At the Exhibit Museum, I experienced what it was like to work in a large museum setting where there was a lot to do and a lot going on. At Cobblestone Farm, I learned how to work in a setting with very limited resources. Today I am on the Board of Directors for Cobblestone Farm and I am continuing to work on improving their collection records.

How did the virtual exhibit project from Museums 301 help reveal the interdisciplinary of museums to you?
The virtual exhibit project was helpful because I discovered there are many things we talked about in class about putting exhibits together that were a lot harder than I originally suspected. For example, in Museums 301, Professor Bradley Taylor explained how to properly write a museum label. When I actually tried to write labels for my project, I found it extremely difficult!
       
What was one thing that surprised you about museums during your pursuit of the museum studies minor?

I had no idea that so much controversy could exist in a museum. Issues such as cultural interpretation, provenance, subject matter, and funding are all very sensitive issues. These issues can become very complicated and complex too.

How do you feel your life at the university and beyond has been and will be affected by pursuing a museum studies minor?
I think I have a much better chance of acquiring my dream of working at a museum. I have background education, experience, and a network of connections.

Why would you recommend a student to pursue a museum studies minor?
In any field of research one studies, there is a good chance that the research will be displayed in a museum and shared with the general public. It is important to know how one’s research is shared.

Where do you see museums fitting into your future?

I definitely want to pursue a career in museums, hopefully working with managing collections. Right now I am trying to gain as much experience as I can until an opportunity for a paid position appears.

Nick Malzahn

Concentrations/Minors: BA Anthropology, Minor in Museum Studies and Global Media Studies

Why did you decide to pursue the museum studies minor?
I first got interested when I took a class about the world of museums. I heard about the program at the end of my sophomore year and it just sounded interesting. I decided to take the first class and see how it went from there. Museums 301 opened me to so many ideas I hadn’t thought of before. In fact, I eventually began to think that this is something I may may want to do with the rest of my life.

How did the museum studies minor impact your other fields of study?
The minor has definitely impacted my anthropology major. Museums are cultural institutions! I actually did my honors thesis on the Charles Wright Museum and my thesis really mixed anthropology and museum studies. They went hand in hand.

What was your favorite class that you took for the minor requirements and why?
My favorite class was the Museums 401 on the changing role of the curator taught by Nancy Bryk. The class talked about curators and museums in general, and really helped me think more about my potential future in curatorial work and how so many things have changed for curators. Museums are evolving and curators are becoming more open to working with other people and not just being stuffy.

Which museums has the minor led you to be involved in?
Beside the Charles Wright Museum and the MSU museum, I have also been involved in the Henry Ford Museum. When I was there, I looked through old postcards for the reinvention of an exhibit. It was my job to pick out postcards that had interesting messages on them that would contribute to the story line of the exhibit. I am also working at the Detroit Zoo doing research with the animal welfare department, which has been a unique look at museums from the living collections side of things.

How do you feel your life at the university and beyond has been and will be affected by pursuing a museum studies minor?
It’s affected me quite a bit! At the university, my whole thesis revolved around museums and I started looking for aspects of museums in other classes I was taking. Plus the minor gave me a good idea on what I want to do in graduate school and for my career. I think I want to be a curator, but I want to get more experience.

Why would you recommend a student to pursue a museum studies minor?
If a student is interested in any sort of cultural department, then I definitely recommend the minor. It’s interdisciplinary. Even if you’re interested in science, there are science centers and zoos, which are museums. Bringing a museum studies minor to the table will give you a better perspective on the whole. Anything can be in a museum. I don’t think it matters what you major in.

Where do you see museums fitting into your future?
As a profession, definitely and hopefully. I see it being a big part of my life. It just seems so welcoming and I could never get bored with museums.

Laura Mason

Concentrations/Minors: Public Policy and Museum Studies minor

Why did you decide to pursue the museum studies minor?
I saw publicity about the museum studies minor around campus the year that the minor became available. I have always been interested in museums and I would love to work for one in the future, so I went to an informational session, and I really liked what I heard. I never had an interest in curating, rather I would like to work with the educational or public progarmming aspect of museums, so this sounded like a perfect program for me.

How did the museum studies minor impact your other fields of study?
I am a public policy major, and being interested in the public programming or public outreach part of museum studies made me look at my degree differently. Public policy is a very broad field, so as a student of it there are many different areas I could choose to focus in on. Because of my minor, I wanted to find the public outreach and community development aspect of public policy, and thus find a way to blend my major and minor, even though they sound very different.

How was your internship experience?
I had a great internship experience. I interned in the education department at the Ann Arbor Hands-On Museum, and thoroughly enjoyed it. I think the internship requirement is a really integral part of the minor, because it forces you to get hands-on experience at an institution, which is great when you are looking for jobs after college, and also encourages you to apply the theories and concepts you have been learning in class to a real world setting.

How did the virtual exhibit project from Museums 301 help reveal the interdisciplinarity of museums to you?
The virtual exhibit project made me realize how many different parts there are to designing an exhibit, as well as how many different types of skills are needed or can be useful when working in a museum in general.

How do you feel your life at the university and beyond has been and will be affected by pursuing a museum studies minor?
The minor has allowed me to become involved with a number of great people and institutions during my time at the University of Michigan. I would really enjoy working for a museum and being able not only to impact the staff, but also the community that institution serves, and I hope the minor can help me achieve that goal in the future.

Why would you recommend a student to pursue a museum studies minor?
I think pursuing a museum studies minor is a great way to gain knowledge about the museum field. It is structured to give students practical, professional experience, and a solid foundation to base their work in a museum on. I would recommend it to anyone who is interested in the field, it is a great way to gain training in the field that you can use to go on to grad school, or simply to work in a museum.

Where do you see museums fitting into your future?
In the future I definitely want to work in a museum. Hopefully, I will work in multiple museums.

Katie Munn

Concentrations/Minors: BA History, Minor Museum Studies

Why did you decide to pursue the museum studies minor?
I decided to pursue the museum studies minor because, after interning at the National Museum of American History, I knew I wanted a career in museums and I wanted to learn more about the field.

How was your internship experience?
I used my program assistant position at the University of Michigan Museum of Art to count toward the internship. I loved working at UMMA. I helped facilitate many of the lectures and performances held at the museum. It was great to see how UMMA has become a true meeting place of the arts. I learned about all the behind-the-scenes planning that goes into implementing programs. The written assignments helped me connect my experiences at UMMA to the broader themes of the museum studies minor coursework. I also enjoyed walking through the galleries on my way to the office!

How did the virtual exhibit project from Museums 301 help reveal the interdisciplinarity of museums to you?
I did my virtual exhibit project on a road trip that my family took from Kalamazoo, Michigan to South Dakota to see Mount Rushmore. As I worked on it, I began to realize that there were many ways that I could tell my story; I could focus on the tourism aspect, the history of South Dakota, or take a more natural science approach and focus on the wildlife of South Dakota. I found a way to weave these different disciplines into a narrative. The virtual exhibit project also helped reveal the interdisciplinary nature of museums to me when we shared the final exhibits with our classmates. It was amazing to see the many different approaches my classmates took with the project.

Which museums has the minor led you to be involved in?
The museum studies minor helped prepare me for my coursework with the Museum Education Program at George Washington University. I just completed my M.A.T. (Masters in the Art of Teaching) and am now working as an Outreach Program Assistant with the White House Historical Association.

What was one thing that surprised you about museums during your pursuit of the museum studies minor?

The museum studies minor opened my eyes to a broader definition of what a museum is. Classes introduced debates over whether certain institutions could be considered museums, such as the Heidelberg Project. Museums can and should be way more than permanent collections in marble halls. This concept surprised me, and it is something I’ll remember as I enter the field.

How do you feel your life at the university and beyond has been and will be affected by pursuing a museum studies minor?
The museum studies minor increased my appreciation of University of Michigan’s museums. The courses gave me a foundation for understanding of how museums work and current issues facing museums today. The minor helped prepare me for my graduate level coursework and sparked an interest in how museums can play a bigger role in their communities.

Why would you recommend a student to pursue a museum studies minor? 11) Where do you see museums fitting into your future?
I would recommend the museum studies minor because it a wonderful way to learn more about the history, present, and future of museums. You get to learn about the field not just through lectures and discussions, but also through hands on experiences and fun projects. It’s also a great way to explore U of M’s excellent museum offerings.

Where do you see museums fitting into your future?

Museums are my future, especially museum education. I want to help bring museum collections to life with educational programming and materials. Not to mention, I’ll always be an avid museum visitor!

Warren Oliver

Concentrations/Minors: BA History, Minor in Museum Studies

Why did you decide to pursue the museum studies minor?
I’ve always been interested in the historical aspect of museums. Plus, everyone says that teaching is the way to go with a history degree and I want to do something different.

How was your internship experience?
My internship was at the Museum of Paleontology. I worked at the storage facility of the museum’s collections and made 3-D models of unique invertebrate specimens. It was so cool because these models were pretty much the first models of these objects made for other scientists to study.

How did the virtual exhibit project from Museums 301 help reveal the interdisciplinarity of museums to you?
The project was pretty general and inclusive, and was designed to allow you to pick whatever you wanted whether it was cultural or scientific. I chose to focus on something with a historical basis and used stuff I had learned from other classes. But I think the interdisciplinarity became evident in the variety of projects.

What was the thematic focus of the Museums 401 class you took and how did it add to the museum studies minor experience?
It was interesting. The focus was on living collections and looking back on it, it was a nice way to round out the minor. The class showed the difficulties of the institution of museums and compared the difference between living and nonliving collections.

How do you feel your life at the university and beyond has been and will be affected by pursuing a museum studies minor?
Well, I squeezed all the classes in despite being a transfer student, which was difficult and affected my university life. But it was worth it. As for how it will affect me, the minor will be a good thing to have on my resume. It’s an added bonus that will push me over the edge.

Where do you see museums fitting into your future?
I want to work in a museum. But I also want to stay involved even if it’s not what pays me. I’ve loved museums since I was a kid and I want to continue being involved with them. I want to make the happen.

Marisa Szpytman

Concentrations/Minors: BA Near Eastern Studies, Museum Studies minor

Why did you decide to pursue the museum studies minor?
When the museum studies minor came out, I was really excited because I had known coming into college that I wanted to do museum work. I knew that I was going to go into a graduate program in museum work and that the minor was a good springboard for looking at graduate programs in museums.

What was your favorite class that you took for the minor requirements and why?
My favorite class was called Museum Research Techniques and it was taught by Lisa Young. That was the single best class that was offered. It was focused on natural history museums and we learned how natural history museums operate and what their history was in the United States and what their collaboration was with source communities. The final project for that class was taking the readings we had done and curating a mock exhibit that included a plan of action for working with source communities and incorporating their perspective. It was very informative and practical.

How was your internship experience?
My internship experience was wonderful. I worked for the collections manager in the anthropology museum at U of M. I learned so much about hands on collections management. We worked on preventative conservation and how to utilize space as well as possible. And I’ve used those skills in other museums I’ve worked in. The importance of archival techniques and updating the database. I worked there for four years, so the internship was a way for me to focus my work more on collections management and the skills I would need to pursue a career in collections management and registrarial work, which I’m also interested in doing.

How did the virtual exhibit project from Museums 301 help reveal the interdisciplinarity of museums to you?
I think the most important thing that project did was illustrate the importance of technology in conjunction with museums. It did show us that museums are turning to digital technology to improve their collections and reach out to a broader public to try and bring in new members and patrons. It showed that there needs to be a marriage of old techniques with new ones.

Which museums has the minor led you to be involved in?
I was already involved in museums when I started the minor. I started the minor in my junior year and I had already been working in the Natural History Museum and the Anthropology Museum for two years. I had already been working in the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology for two years and had already interned at the Henry Ford Museum. So I already knew that I wanted to work in museums and I continued working in all of those museums. What the minor did for me, was give me a good theoretical and historical background so I could approach what I was doing in the museum through a slightly different lens.

How do you feel your life at the university and beyond has been and will be affected by pursuing a museum studies minor?
I think it will be affected very much so. I’m going to graduate school this fall at U of M in the archives and record management program because I want to work in a museum in collections management or as a registrar. I think that the minor really gave me a solid background in theoretical aspects of museums as well as some of these more complicated intellectual issues.

Where do you see museums fitting into your future?
I am definitely on the track for a career in museums.