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Course Assessment vs. Course Requirements

Course Assessment

The LSA Curriculum Committee is interested in learning how the department will assess the course in meeting its curricular goals.  A response may include a brief description of the department's annual process for deciding which courses to offer and any special steps for review of the new course.  It may also state how the course content, structure, or pedagogy will be assessed by the instructor and the department in order to improve teaching and learning in the class and contribute to the department's curriculum.  Examples of the latter include: syllabus and course materials review; classroom observation; and responses from students in class, advising appointments, course evaluations, or CRLT Midterm Student Feedback sessions.

Course Requirements

This field asks how the instructor plans to evaluate student performance in the course, i.e. the basis for grading. In addition to a syllabus, the Curriculum Committee expects a new Course Approval Request Form (CARF) to include details, i.e. the minimum length of papers, the type of exams, descriptions of projects. Even though assignments change over time, a general plan for grading the course, for example:

Mid-term exam 25% (combination of short questions and short essays); final paper 40% (20 pages); and weekly homework assignments 35% (examples in syllabus).

The committee is especially concerned about how writing is utilized as a teaching tool in distribution courses.  A summary of its suggestions can be found in the linked document on the writing component in courses proposed to the LSA Curriculum Committee.

Generic Definitions for Area Distributions (HU, NS, SS, MSA, CE, ID)

Humanities (HU)

Humanities courses focus on creations of the human mind as expressed, for example, in literature, religion, philosophy, music, and the visual and performing arts. Its methods are analytical, critical, and speculative, and can often be contrasted with the quantitative and qualitative methods employed in the social sciences. Examples of humanistic study would include analysis of visual arts, literary forms, aesthetic values, and moral and ethical philosophies. Study in the humanities leads to a better understanding of the human condition and what it means to be human. Such study fosters a deeper appreciation of one or more cultural areas by focusing close attention on exemplary practices or works and how they fit within their larger context. Several fields such as communications, cultural anthropology, history, and linguistics can be studied with either a humanistic or social scientific method.

Natural Sciences (NS)

Natural science courses focus on understanding the natural world through application of the scientific method, which emphasizes observation, experimentation, formation of testable hypotheses about natural phenomena, and testing of those hypotheses. Courses do not have to emphasize all of these areas to qualify. For example, descriptive astronomy courses (emphasizing the observational aspect and the conclusions that can be drawn from those observations), chemistry laboratory courses (emphasizing the experimental aspect), and theoretical physics courses (which lay the groundwork for formation of testable hypotheses about the physical universe) could all lie well within the realm of natural science courses.

Courses that apply the scientific method to the understanding of human behavior would generally not be considered natural science courses, but would fall within the realm of the social sciences. However, courses that seek knowledge about the biological underpinnings of certain aspects of human behavior could well be natural science courses. Some examples would include certain aspects of neuroscience, bio-psychology, and cognition. While there have been many valuable mathematical and statistical tools developed to support the natural sciences, courses that focus primarily on those tools rather than their application to the study of the natural world would more likely fall within the realm of mathematical and symbolic analysis courses.

Social Sciences (SS)

Social science courses focus on people and the institutions within which they interact as individuals, and in groups, societies, nations, and states. Social scientists often use qualitative methods, such as ethnography, oral history, and descriptive analysis of archival materials and artifacts. They also use quantitative tools grounded in the scientific method to collect and analyze data, and form testable hypotheses about social phenomena. Examples of quantitative social science would include survey research and economic modeling. Topics studied by social scientists include voting behavior, consumer preferences, academic achievement, and population growth.

The quantitative and qualitative methods employed in the social sciences can often be contrasted with the analytical, critical, and speculative methods used in the humanities that focus on the human condition as expressed, for example, in literature, religion, philosophy, and the visual and performing arts. Several fields such as communications, cultural anthropology, history, and linguistics can be studied with either a humanistic or social scientific method.

Math & Symbolic Analysis (MSA)

MSA courses focus primarily on the mathematical and statistical tools used to support the study of the natural and social sciences. Rather than mathematical manipulation or computation, these courses focus on the methodology used to analyze quantitative information to make decisions, judgments and predictions. This involves defining a problem by means of numerical or geometrical representations of real-world phenomena, determining how to solve it, deducing consequences, formulating alternatives, and predicting outcomes. In addition to mathematics and statistics, MSA courses are taught in a variety of subjects, including astronomy, biology, chemistry, economics, the environment, geological sciences, philosophy, physics, and sociology.

Creative Expression (CE)

Creative Expression courses entail hands-on activities that allow students to express their creativity through a wide range of arts. This differs from courses in the Humanities (HU) that are taught at a more theoretical or abstract level. For example, HU music courses focus on theory without making sounds or practicing music. CE courses teach students how to apply the theory not only on paper but through playing an instrument, creating sound, composing music, or arranging music. CE courses may address many different mediums, including the performing arts, fine arts, plastic and visual arts architecture, ceramics, metalworking, paper and textiles, woodworking, and glass.

Interdisciplinary (ID)

Interdisciplinary courses combine in roughly equal measure the approaches within two or three of the primary distributions (HU, NS, and SS) in order to examine the differences and similarities between disciplines and explore alternative ways of discovering and organizing knowledge. Interdisciplinary work is primarily concerned with crossings and connections between areas of knowledge, inquiry, and method. These courses emphasize critical thinking, team-based intellectual work, and the analytic skills characteristic of each discipline.

Proposals to Meet LSA General Requirements

Quantitative Reasoning Requirement (QR1/QR2)

Quantitative Reasoning is first and foremost reasoning. It is not mathematical manipulation or computation, but rather the methodology used to process and analyzes quantitative information in order to make judgments and predictions. To satisfy these criteria courses must provide students with quantitative tools and require them to make significant use of these tools in the context of the other material. Some typical student activities might include:

  • Determining whether a proposed relationship between two or more quantities exists or is valid, and to what extent other related variables need to be taken into account
  • Extensive written analysis of quantitative relationships and conclusions that can be drawn from them
  • Quantitative exercises and problems whose answer cannot be reduced to a single number, formula or phrase—and in particular, cannot be answered by a choice from a list
  • Design of experiments or surveys for gathering quantitative data to answer a real-world question
  • Solving of complex real-world problems using non-routine calculations based on a non-trivial theory

To submit a QR1 or QR2 proposal, download the QR Requirement Form and attach the required documentation.

Race and Ethnicity (R&E)

R&E courses must devote substantial but not necessarily exclusive attention to the following issues: a) Meaning of race, ethnicity and racism, b) Racial and ethnic intolerance and resulting inequality as it occurs in the U.S. or elsewhere, and c) Comparisons of discrimination based on race, ethnicity, religion, social class or gender. See additional information.

If course fulfills the R&E requirement, download the R&E Proposal Form and attach documentation.

First-Year Writing Requirement (FYWR)

The goal of the First‐Year Writing Requirement is to prepare students to write in diverse academic contexts. As a broad preparation for the range of writing tasks students will encounter at the University of Michigan and beyond, FYWR courses emphasize evidenced, academic writing in a variety of genres and rhetorical situations. This course is foundational for students to master the kind of analysis and argumentation found in sophisticated academic writing. FYWR proposals and syllabi must be submitted to the Sweetland Center for Writing. See additional information.

Upper-level Writing Requirement (ULWR)

ULWR courses must include the following learning goals:

  • Logically organize their thoughts into writing
  • Use clear and concise language
  • Analyze information masterfully
  • Incorporate appropriate evidence into their analyses
  • Understand the central concepts, approaches, materials and written conventions in their chosen concentration.

Over the course of the term, students will complete several writing assignments that are related to course content and intended to help students practice the rhetoric of their specific discipline. Possible assignments may include journals, research papers, critical analyses, and/or lab reports. Students will receive feedback on their writing from their ULWR instructor and are expected to revise much of their work throughout the term. See additional information.

Further resources can be found on the Sweetland Center for Writing website:

Support for ULWR Courses

The Writing Component in LSA Course Proposals

The LSA Curriculum Committee recognizes and endorses the importance placed on writing throughout the curriculum, as affirmed by the Faculty’s adoption of the First-Year and Upper-Level Writing Requirements into the LSA Faculty Code. The Committee further recognizes the significant role of writing in fostering and consolidating student learning even in courses that are not designed to be writing intensive.

We encourage faculty to integrate regular and varied modes of writing into their courses as an effective reinforcement of course content. Under certain circumstances, the Curriculum Committee may suggest that a proposed course would benefit from longer or more frequent opportunities for student composing:

Distribution Credit

Courses for which distribution credit is requested can benefit from a strong writing component, due to the opportunity it provides students to express in their own words their understanding of the important paradigms, principles, ideas, accomplishments, and modes of analysis characteristic of the field and discipline. When distribution credit is requested, the Curriculum Committee’s main concern is whether the proposed course content addresses the area distribution guidelines; at the same time, the Committee encourages all faculty to consider incorporating appropriate forms of writing into their courses. It is understood that the role and style of writing in different distribution areas will take a variety of different forms. Writing assignments may range from formal, revised essays, lab reports, or research reports as a primary means for assessing student learning, to short reflections, responses, or blogs that complement exams and other forms of assessment.

Credit Hours and Course Level

On occasion, the Curriculum Committee will conclude that a proposed course should have its content augmented to match the number of credit hours or the course level requested. When that happens, the Committee may suggest increasing the frequency or length of writing assignments, precisely because of the value the Committee places on writing. The Committee always invites alternative suggestions from the course proposer, who may have another vision of how the course could be enhanced.

Faculty are invited to consult the Sweetland Writing Center at swcinfo@umich.edu for assistance designing writing prompts and for examples of how writing can be incorporated into and foster student learning in a variety of disciplines.

Course Numbering Policies

As stated in the LSA Faculty Code (B.2.02), courses shall be numbered and designated as follows.

  • Courses 100-199:  introductory, beginning courses, typically for first-year students and sophomores
  • Courses 200-299:  intermediate, lower division, sophomore courses
  • Courses 300-399:  upper-class, concentration courses, juniors and seniors
  • Courses 400-499:  upper-class, concentration courses, junior and seniors, and lower-level graduate students
  • Courses 500 and higher:  graduate courses

Ideally students can use the numbering system as a guide to determine the intended audience and degree of difficulty. The Curriculum Committee will not approve any new course proposals not in compliance with the code. Accordingly, no new 500-level courses will be approved for undergraduate credit. Each department will be asked to bring existing course numbers into conformity with the Code at the time of its external review.

All LSA courses, including those approved for graduate credit only, count toward the minimum 100 LSA credits out of the total 120 required for an undergraduate degree. Unless courses are restricted to graduate students only, undergraduates are allowed to enroll in graduate-level courses for credit.

The online Course Guide routinely lists 500-level courses approved for undergraduate credit. Listing 600-level courses requires approval from the dean's office. Students can search the online Course Guide for undergraduate classes, graduate classes, or all types. Most departments consider graduate courses appropriate for advanced undergraduates or Honors students. In fact, many concentration programs require a significant amount of 500- and 600-level coursework.

Although instructors need not specify the nature of the extra work, graduate credit earned in an UG/Grad credit course assumes a higher level of performance typical of graduate 500-level courses. It has always been the expectation of Rackham Graduate School that graduate students be required to do additional work in order to earn graduate credit in a 400-level course. At the request of Rackham, new course approval request forms and modifications allow only “Rackham Grad with additional work.”

Class Type Definitions

Key to Class Schedule

Comments about Class Types

LEC – Lecture

Primarily one-way communication
of prepared content from
instructor to students.

Perhaps the most common class
type in LSA, which may be combined
with a discussion section and/or lab.

DIS – Discussion

Two-way communication between instructor and students typically related to the lecture and/or assignments.

Discussion sections must be attached to a Lecture. GSI-led sections associated with faculty-led sections should be set up as LEC + DIS. Sections offered as a freestanding class will not appear in the time schedule.

IND – Independent Study

Independent study with individual consultation and guidance from instructor.

Independent Studies are freestanding and not linked with any other class type.

LAB – Laboratory
Instructor supervises investigations
by students individually or as a group.

Labs are most often associated with Lectures, but also may be freestanding. Sometimes required film viewing may be scheduled as a lab without credit. Classes conducted in a laboratory setting must meet two hours for each credit earned.

PSI - Personalized System
of Instruction

No formal lectures, mastery-oriented, student-proctored, self-paced system with printed study guides. Also known as the Keller Plan.

The Keller Plan is used only in Physics and Biochemistry. Otherwise it’s seldom used anymore.

REC – Recitation *

Instructor prepares content and
leads students in a joint examination. Not supplemental to lectures.

Freestanding, i.e. not linked with any other class component. Most commonly used in subjects such as math and languages.

SEM – Seminar *

Students prepare materials and lead discussion under the instructor's guidance.

Freestanding, i.e. not linked with any other class component. Typical differences from Lecture type: smaller class enrollment (12-25); lively discussions; and less time devoted to instructor’s presentation of material.

* Distinctions between a Recitation and a Seminar are somewhat fine. In part it has to do with class size. Seminars typically have 12-15 students, while Recitations typically have up to about 40 students. Obviously, active student leadership of discussions becomes more difficult in a class larger than 20 or 25.

   The primary difference is in style of instruction. In Seminars students should be active participants in discussions, sometimes incorporating individual or group presentations. In Recitations the instructor plays the principal role and students respond. This style is commonly used in language instruction and math.

Courses Currently Approved to Meet the Race & Ethnicity Requirement

Courses Currently Approved to Meet the Race & Ethnicity (R&E) Requirement

 

(4/22/16)

Note: A course must be at least three credits to meet the R&E requirement.

*Only sections with the approved sub-title will fulfill R&E; other section topics of the same course may not fulfill R&E. 

 

*ACABS 100 / AAPTIS 100 / HJCS 100 / HISTORY 132. Peoples of the Middle East.
    Issues in Race & Ethnicity. (W18)

AMCULT 201. American Values: Inventing a Useable Past for an American Present. (W21)

*AMCULT 204. Themes in American Culture
    Race, Immigration, and Digital Technology. (W21)

AMCULT/ LATINOAM 213. Introduction to Latina/o Studies. (W21)

AMCULT 214 / ASIANPAM 214. Introduction to Asian/Pacific American Studies. (W21)

AMCULT 215. Introduction to Arab-American Studies. (W18)

AMCULT 225. Space, Story, Self. (W21)

AMCULT / HISTORY / LATINOAM 226. The Latin Tinge

AMCULT 235 / WOMENSTD 235. From Harems to Terrorists: Representing the Middle East in Hollywood Cinema. (W17)

AMCULT 242 / WOMENSTD 242. Gender Violence in a Global Context. (W21)

AMCULT 243 / WOMENSTD 243. Introduction to Study of Latinas in the U.S. (W17)

AMCULT 263 / HISTORY 262. The American South. (W21)

*AMCULT 310. Topics in Ethnic Studies.
    Filipino American Experience (W21)

AMCULT 311. Race and Mixed Race. (W20)

AMCULT 331 / HISTORY 356 / WOMENSTD 356. Health in America: Patterns, Experiences, and Inequalities. (W19)

AMCULT 367 / NATIVEAM 367. American Indian History. (W21)

AMCULT 399. Race in America.  (W19)

*AMCULT 405. Topics in American Culture.
    American Blues Music. (W19)

*ANTHRARC 285. Frauds and Fantastic Claims in Archaeology. (W18)

ANTHRCUL 101. Introduction to Anthropology. (W17)

ANTHRCUL 202. Ethnic Diversity in Japan. (W18)

ANTHRCUL 319. Latin American Society and Culture. (W18)

ASIAN 248 / Religion 248. Jesus Comes to Asia: Conversion and its Consequences. (W17)

*ASIAN 260 / HISTORY 252. Chinese Culture to the Mongols
    Introduction to Chinese Civilization. (W19)

ASIAN 332. South Asian Literature and Culture: South Asian Identity, Writing Home from Away. (W19)

CAAS 208 / HISTART 208. Introduction to African Art and Visual Culture. (W20)

CAAS 271 / ENGLISH 274. Introduction to African American Literature. (W17)

CAAS 322 / ENVIRON 335. Introduction to Environmental Politics: Race, Class, and Gender. (W17)

CAAS 346 / HISTORY 362 / ENGLISH 389. Literature in African History (W17)

*CAAS 358. Topics in Black World Studies.
    The Cultures of Portuguese Speaking Africa. (W17)

*CAAS 394 / AC 301 / WOMENSTD 343. Junior Seminar in Professional Writing:
    Gender and Hair in African American Cultural Politics. (W21)

CAAS 432 / ENVIRON 434.
    Violent Environments: Oil, Development and the Discourse of Power. (W17)

CLARCH 223 / CLCIV 223. Greeks and Barbarians. (W20)

COMM 444. Race, Representation and the Media. (W20)

DUTCH 160. First-Year Seminar: Colonialism & Its Aftermath. (W19)

DUTCH 340. Amsterdam: Negotiating Tolerance. (W18)

DUTCH 351 / JUDAIC 351. Ann Frank in Context. (W19)

EDUC 118. Introduction to Education: Schooling and Multicultural Society (W17)

EDUC 210. College Access & Equity. (W21)

ENGLISH 140. First Year Seminar:
    Our Heroes: What’s the Story? (W17)
    Race in the Age of Obama. (W19)

English 203. Introduction to Language and Rhetoric:
    Rhetorical Dimensions of U.S. Civil Rights Movements. (W20)

*ENGLISH 303. Language and Rhetorical Studies.
    Rhetorical Activism and U.S. Civil Rights Movement (W20)

English 317. Literature and Culture:
    Trading Places: Identity and Impersonation in American Literature. (W20)

ENGLISH 319. Literature and Social Change:
    What Difference Does a Story Make? (W17)

ENVIRON 222. Introduction to Environmental Justice. (W21)

*FRENCH 363. Caribbean Studies.
    Metissage, Gender, & Identity in the French Caribbean. (W17)

*FRENCH 361. French American Studies. (W21)
    French American Studies (W21)

 

GERMAN 396 / HISTORY 396 / AAS 395. Germany and the Black Diaspora. (W21)

GERMAN 464. Postwar German Ethnicities in Literature and Culture (W17)

HISTART 208 / AAS 208. Introduction to African Art and Visual Culture. (W20)

HISTART 394. Race and Visual Culture in France: From the French Revolution to the Jazz-Age. (W19)

HISTORY 101 / CICS 202. What is History? (W18)

HISTORY  105. Introduction to Religion: From Rastafari to the Sun Dance. (W17)

HISTORY 205 / ASIAN 205. Modern East Asia. (W17)

*HISTORY 207 / ASIAN 207. Southeast Asian Civilization.
    Issues in Race & Ethnicity (W19)

*HISTORY 210 / MEMS 210. Early Medieval Europe.    
    Issues in Race & Ethnicity. (W20)

*HISTORY 211 / MEMS 211. Later Middle Ages, 1100-1500.
    Issues in Race & Ethnicity. (W19)

HISTORY 219 / ASIAN 210. The Philippines: Culture and History. (W17)

*HISTORY 230. Humanities Topics in History. 
    Middle Ages & Modern Problems. (W19)

 

HISTORY 240. The World Since 1492. (W17)

HISTORY 244 / AAPTIS 244 / MENAS 244 / HJCS 244 / JUDAIC 244: The Arab-Jewish Conflict in the Middle East, c. 1880 to Present (W20)

HISTORY 247 / AAS 247.  Modern Africa. (W17)

HISTORY 255.  Gandhi's India. (W19)

HISTORY 261. United States History, 1865-Present (W19)

HISTORY 262 / AMCULT 263. The American South. (W21)

HISTORY 309. After Alexander: The Hellenistic Age in the Mediterranean and the Near East. (W17)

HISTORY 320.  Britain, 1901-1939: Culture and Politics. (W19)

HISTORY 325 / RELIGION 325 / AAPTIS 325 / ASIAN 324.  The History of Islam in South Asia. (W18)

HISTORY 322 / GERMAN 322. The Origins of Nazism, Culture and Politics in Germany, 1981-1945. (W17)

HISTORY 347 / ANTHRCUL 346. Latin America: The Colonial Period. (W21)

*HISTORY 348. Latin America: The National Period.
    Issues in Race & Ethnicity. (W20)

HISTORY 355 / CAAS 355 / ANTHRCUL 355. Health and Illness in African Worlds.  (W18)

*HISTORY 368 / AMCULT 342 / WOMENSTD 360. History of the Family in the U.S.    
    Issues in Race & Ethnicity. (W20)

HISTORY 371 / WOMENSTD 371. Women in American History Since 1870. (W17)

*HISTORY 386 / JUDAIC 396 / GERMAN 391. The Holocaust. (W21)

 

ITALIAN 311. Making Difference in Italy. (W17)

ITALIAN 415 / AAPTIS 463. Crusade and Jihad. (W19)

JUDAIC 250 / SAC 250 / HJCS 250. Jewish Film: Race, Ethnicity, and Nationality (W21)

JUDAIC STUDIES 290 / HISTORY 258. Jews and Muslims: History of Jewish-Muslim Relations. (W19)

LATINOAM 213 / AMCULT 213. Introduction to Latina/o Studies. (W21)

LING 370 / ANTHRCUL 370. Language and Discrimination: Language as Social Statement.  (W21)

NEAREAST 207 / RELIGION 277 / JUDAIC 277. The Land of Israel / Palestine through the AGES. (W21)

NEAREAST 221. Iranian Cinema. (W21)

NEAREAST 340 / HISTORY 340 / ASIAN 340 / MENAS 340 / REEES 340. From Genghis Khan to the Taliban: Modern Central Asia. (W21)

PHIL 244. Global Justice. (W21)

PHIL 355. Contemporary Moral Problems. (W17)

PHIL 359. Law and Philosophy. (W21)

PSYCH 310 / SOC 320. Training Processes of Intergroup Dialogues Facilitation.  (W19)

*RCHUMS 305. Cultural Confrontations in the Arts.
    Issues in Race & Ethnicity. (W21)

*RCHUMS 308 / ASIAN 308. Arts & Ideas of Modern South & Southeast Asia.
    Issues in Race & Ethnicity. (W21)

*RCHUMS 334. Special Topics in Humanities
    The Harlem Renaissance: The New Negro Movement. (W17)
    / SW 513. Empowering Community through Creative                       Expression: Theory & Practice. (W19)

RCSSCI 381. Race and Racism in Post-Racial America. (W18)

*REEES 405. Topics in Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies
    Blood Feuds and Clashes of Civilizations: the Balkans and the Caucasus. (W17)

RUSSIAN 322. Russia Today
    Culture and Identity in a “Multi-National State” (W18)

RUSSIAN 375. Literature and Empire: Nineteenth-Century Russian Prose. (W21)

SAC 316 / ITALIAN 316. Screening Italian Americans. (W17)

SAC 333. Fascist Cinema. (W17)

SLAVIC 150. Prague: The Magic City. (W19)

SLAVIC 150. Gipsy Kings?! The Peripheral Culture: Roma Minority in Central and Eastern Europe. (W19)

*SLAVIC 225. Arts and Cultures of Central Europe.
    Issues in Race & Ethnicity. (W18)

SLAVIC 312 / RCHUMS 312. Central European Cinema.
    Race, Ethnicity, and Gender. (W21)

Slavic 316 / RCLANG 333. RUSLAN: Russian Language, Culture and People in the US. (W20)

SOC 303 / CAAS 303. Race and Ethnic Relations. (W21)

STDABRD 344. CGIS:
    Contemporary London, In London, United Kingdom: The New       Face of England: Understanding Cultural Diversity. (W19)

    CONTEMPORARY LONDON, in London, United Kingdom: Black       Britain: Immigration, Culture, and Identity in 21st London.           (W20)

    Topic 081. "London is the Place for Me": Multicultural Britain       in the Age of Immigration: British Postcolonial and       Immigration History. (W21)

    Topic 082. Community Action in Contemporary London.        (W21)

UC / PSYCH / SOC 122. Intergroup Dialogue. (W20)

UC 151. Social Justice, Identity, Diversity, and Community. (W20)

WOMENSTD 220 / NURS 220. Perspectives in Women’s Health. (W17)

WOMENSTD 250. Race, Gender and Nation. (W17)

*WOMENSTD 270. Gender and the Law.
    Issues in Race & Ethnicity. (W19)
    Issues in Race & Ethnicity. (W20)

Teaching Questionnaire Items for Evaluating R&E Courses

Teaching Questionnaire Items for R&E Course Evaluations

Race and Ethnicity (R&E) courses are recertified every five years. To assist the Curriculum Committee in reviewing proposals for renewal of an R&E course designation, the R&E Subcommittee recommends that faculty teaching R&E courses be strongly encouraged to use in their end-of-term teaching evaluations the following two questions from the Teaching Questionnaire (TQ) inventory of items

132. I learned to think critically about difficult issues of diversity.

186. The instructor was effective in handling multicultural issues and content.

When requesting recertification of the R&E designation, instructors would be asked to submit the teaching evaluation responses to these questions in addition to currently-requested materials.

R&E instructors also may find other questions, such as those listed below, relevant and useful. The full list of TQ questions may be found here: Recommended Teaching Questionnaire Items for R&E Course Evaluations

            131. I became more aware of multiple perspectives on issues of diversity.

            185. The instructor was sensitive to multicultural issues in the classroom.

            187. The instructor promoted meaningful discussions of issues of diversity.

            245. The instructor valued the diversity of life experiences among students.

            251. The instructor saw cultural and personal differences as assets.

            257. Writing assignments encouraged the inclusion of diverse perspectives.

            258. Reading assignments covered material from diverse perspectives.

            259. The course pack covered material from diverse perspectives.

 

            910. How might the class climate be made more inclusive of diverse students?

            911. How might the course content be more inclusive of diverse groups?

            912. How might the course materials be more inclusive of diverse groups?

            913. How might the teaching methods used be more sensitive to diverse needs?

            914. How might working in groups be made more inclusive for diverse students?

All Courses Approved to Meet the QR Requirement

QR/1 earns full QR credit; QR/2 earns half QR credit

ASTRO 201. Introduction to Astrophysics QR/1
ASTRO 101. Introductory Astronomy: The Solar System and the Search for Life Beyond Earth QR/2
ASTRO 102. Introductory Astronomy: Stars, Galaxies, and the Universe QR/2
ASTRO 104. Alien Skies: A Tour Through the Universe QR/2
ASTRO 105. The Cosmos Through the Constellations QR/2
ASTRO 115. Introductory Astrobiology: The Search for Life in the Universe QR/2
ASTRO 142. From the Big Bang to the Milky Way QR/2
ASTRO 205. Exploring the X-ray Universe QR/1
ASTRO 220. New Discoveries in Astronomy QR/2
BIOPHYS 120. The Discovery of the DNA Double Helix and its Hidden Mysteries QR/1
BIOPHYS 290 / PHYSICS 290. Physics of the Body and Mind QR/2
CHEM 130. General Chemistry: Macroscopic Investigations and Reaction Principles QR/2
CMPLXSYS 430. Modeling Infectious Diseases QR/2
COMM 211. Evaluating Information QR/1
EARTH 130 / CHEM 108 / PHYSICS 119. The Physical World QR/2
EARTH 222 / ENVIRON 232. Introductory Oceanography QR/2
EARTH 223 / ENVIRON 233. Introductory Oceanography, Laboratory QR/2
EARTH 380 / ENVIRON 380. Mineral Resources, Economics, and the Environment QR/2
EARTH 468. Data Analysis and Model Estimation QR/2
ECON 101. Principles of Economics I QR/2
ECON 102. Principles of Economics II QR/2
ECON 309. Experimental Economics QR/1
ECON 401. Intermediate Microeconomic Theory QR/1
ECON 402. Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory QR/1
ECON 404. Statistics for Economists QR/1
ECON 405. Introduction to Statistics QR/1
EEB 483. Freshwater Ecosystems: Limnology QR/1
MATH 105. Data, Functions, and Graphs QR/1
MATH 107. Mathematics for the Information Age QR/1
MATH 115. Calculus I QR/1
MATH 116. Calculus II QR/1
MATH 156. Applied Honors Calculus II QR/1
MATH 175. An Introduction to Cryptology QR/1
MATH 176. Explorations in Topology and Analysis QR/1
MATH 185. Honors Calculus I QR/1
MATH 186. Honors Calculus II QR/1
MATH 214. Linear Algebra and Differential Equations QR/1
MATH 215. Calculus III QR/1
MATH 216. Introduction to Differential Equations QR/1
MATH 217. Linear Algebra QR/1
MATH 255. Applied Honors Calculus III QR/1
MATH 256. Applied Honors Calculus IV QR/1
MATH 285. Honors Calculus III QR/1
MATH 286. Honors Differential Equations QR/1
MATH 295. Honors Mathematics I QR/1
MATH 296. Honors Mathematics II QR/1
PHIL 296. Honors Introduction to Logic QR/1
PHIL 303. Introduction to Symbolic Logic QR/1
PHIL 305. Introduction to Formal Philosophical Methods QR/1
PHIL 414. Mathematical Logic QR/1
PHYSICS 107. 20th-Century Concepts of Space, Time, and Matter QR/1
PHYSICS 111. The Evolution of Scientific Thought QR/2
PHYSICS 116. From Quarks to Cosmos QR/1
PHYSICS 126. General Physics: Electricity and Light QR/1
PHYSICS 135. Physics for the Life Sciences I QR/1
PHYSICS 140. General Physics I QR/1
PHYSICS 145. General Physics QR/1
PHYSICS 160. Honors Physics I QR/1
PHYSICS 235. Physics for the Life Sciences II QR/1
PHYSICS 240. General Physics II QR/1
PHYSICS 260. Honors Physics II QR/1
PHYSICS 288. Physics of Music QR/1
PHYSICS 401. Intermediate Mechanics QR/1
POLSCI 387. Comparative Analysis of Government Institutions QR/2
POLSCI 391 / CMPLXSYS 391. Introduction to Modeling Political Processes QR/1
PSYCH 448. Mathematical Psychology QR/2
PUBPOL 250 / CMPLXSYS 250. Social Systems, Energy, and Public Policy QR/1
RCIDIV 222. Quantitatively Speaking QR/1
SOC 210. Elementary Statistics QR/1
SOC 310. Sociological Research Methods QR/1
SOC 312. The Evaluation of Evidence in Sociology QR/1
SOC 430. World Population Dynamics QR/2
STATS 125. Games, Gambling and Coincidences QR/1
STATS 150. Making Sense of Data QR/1
STATS 250. Introduction to Statistics and Data Analysis QR/1
STATS 280. Honors Introduction to Statistics and Data Analysis QR/1
STATS 400. Applied Statistical Methods QR/1
STATS 401. Applied Statistical Methods II QR/1
STATS 412. Introduction to Probability and Statistics QR/1
WRITING 410. Quantitative Analysis and Writing in the Disciplines QR/2

Courses Approved for QR/1

 
ASTRO 201. Introduction to Astrophysics
ASTRO 205. Exploring the X-ray Universe
BIOPHYS 120. The Discovery of the DNA Double Helix and its Hidden Mysteries
COMM 211. Evaluating Information
ECON 309. Experimental Economics
ECON 401. Intermediate Microeconomic Theory
ECON 402. Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory
ECON 404. Statistics for Economists
ECON 405. Introduction to Statistics
EEB 483. Freshwater Ecosystems: Limnology
MATH 105. Data, Functions, and Graphs
MATH 107. Mathematics for the Information Age
MATH 115. Calculus I
MATH 116. Calculus II
MATH 156. Applied Honors Calculus II
MATH 175. An Introduction to Cryptology
MATH 176. Explorations in Topology and Analysis
MATH 185. Honors Calculus I
MATH 186. Honors Calculus II
MATH 214. Linear Algebra and Differential Equations
MATH 215. Calculus III
MATH 216. Introduction to Differential Equations
MATH 217. Linear Algebra
MATH 255. Applied Honors Calculus III
MATH 256. Applied Honors Calculus IV
MATH 285. Honors Calculus III
MATH 286. Honors Differential Equations
MATH 295. Honors Mathematics I
MATH 296. Honors Mathematics II
PHIL 296. Honors Introduction to Logic
PHIL 303. Introduction to Symbolic Logic
PHIL 305. Introduction to Formal Philosophical Methods
PHIL 414. Mathematical Logic
PHYSICS 107. 20th-Century Concepts of Space, Time, and Matter
PHYSICS 116. From Quarks to Cosmos
PHYSICS 126. General Physics: Electricity and Light
PHYSICS 135. Physics for the Life Sciences I
PHYSICS 140. General Physics I
PHYSICS 145. General Physics
PHYSICS 160. Honors Physics I
PHYSICS 235. Physics for the Life Sciences II
PHYSICS 240. General Physics II
PHYSICS 260. Honors Physics II
PHYSICS 288. Physics of Music
PHYSICS 401. Intermediate Mechanics
POLSCI 391 / CMPLXSYS 391. Introduction to Modeling Political Processes
PUBPOL 250 / CMPLXSYS 250. Social Systems, Energy, and Public Policy
RCIDIV 222. Quantitatively Speaking
SOC 210. Elementary Statistics
SOC 310. Sociological Research Methods
SOC 312. The Evaluation of Evidence in Sociology
STATS 125. Games, Gambling and Coincidences
STATS 150. Making Sense of Data
STATS 250. Introduction to Statistics and Data Analysis
STATS 280. Honors Introduction to Statistics and Data Analysis
STATS 400. Applied Statistical Methods
STATS 401. Applied Statistical Methods II
STATS 412. Introduction to Probability and Statistics

Courses Approved for QR/2

ASTRO 101. Introductory Astronomy: The Solar System and the Search for Life Beyond Earth
ASTRO 102. Introductory Astronomy: Stars, Galaxies, and the Universe
ASTRO 104. Alien Skies: A Tour Through the Universe
ASTRO 105. The Cosmos Through the Constellations
ASTRO 115. Introductory Astrobiology: The Search for Life in the Universe
ASTRO 142. From the Big Bang to the Milky Way
ASTRO 220. New Discoveries in Astronomy
BIOPHYS 290 / PHYSICS 290. Physics of the Body and Mind
CHEM 130. General Chemistry: Macroscopic Investigations and Reaction Principles
CMPLXSYS 430. Modeling Infectious Diseases
EARTH 130 / CHEM 108 / PHYSICS 119. The Physical World
EARTH 222 / ENVIRON 232. Introductory Oceanography
EARTH 223 / ENVIRON 233. Introductory Oceanography, Laboratory
EARTH 380 / ENVIRON 380. Mineral Resources, Economics, and the Environment
EARTH 468. Data Analysis and Model Estimation
ECON 101. Principles of Economics I
ECON 102. Principles of Economics II
PHYSICS 111. The Evolution of Scientific Thought
POLSCI 387. Comparative Analysis of Government Institutions
PSYCH 448. Mathematical Psychology
SOC 430. World Population Dynamics
WRITING 410. Quantitative Analysis and Writing in the Disciplines