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Interdisciplinary Seminar for Islamic Studies workshop with Michigan Anthropology alum Professor Flagg Miller

Friday, February 17, 2012
12:00 AM
Vandenberg Room at the Michigan League

The Interdisciplinary Seminar for Islamic Studies will be holding a workshop with Professor Flagg Miller (UC Davis and UM anthro alum), who will discuss and workshop his latest work-in-progress: "Breakfast before Jihad: Reluctant Asceticism in an Age of Global Islamic Struggle." The workshop will be held from 1-3pm in the Vandenberg Room at the Michigan League (2nd floor).Please RSVP to casarge@umich.edu by Friday, February 10th to receive a copy of the manuscript. Lunch and refreshments will be provided.
The Interdisciplinary Seminar for Islamic Studies will be holding a workshop with Professor Flagg Miller (UC Davis and UM anthro alum), who will discuss and workshop his latest work-in-progress: "Breakfast before Jihad: Reluctant Asceticism in an Age of Global Islamic Struggle." The workshop will be held from 1-3pm in the Vandenberg Room at the Michigan League (2nd floor). Please RSVP by Friday, February 10th to receive a copy of the manuscript. Lunch and refreshments will be provided. Flagg Miller Bio: Dr. Miller's research focuses on cultures of contemporary Muslim reform in the Middle East and especially Yemen. His interdisciplinary work on religion draws from linguistic and cultural anthropology, history, media theory, poetics, philosophy, and cultural studies. He has lived and studied in the Middle East and North Africa for over four years, including Tunisia, Syria, and Yemen. He is the author of The Moral Resonance of Arab Media: Audiocassette Poetry and Culture in Yemen (Harvard University Press), has published pieces in several academic journals, including American Ethnologist, International Journal of Middle East Studies, American Anthropologist, and Journal of Women's History, and has contributed to several edited volumes. Dr. Miller received an M.St. from Oxford University and completed his Ph.D. at the University of Michigan in 2001. He teaches in department of Religious Studies at the University of California Davis. He is currently working on a book project that focuses on an audiocassette collection formerly owned by Osama Bin Laden. Currently held at Yale University, the audiocassette collection represents the most important archive for understanding Bin Laden’s intellectual formation. My book will explore the contents of the collection and its implications for our understandings of Bin Laden’s militant movement, but will also situate these insights in relation to a broader consideration of the role of Arabic language studies for contemporary Muslim reformers